Tagged: Writing and Grammar Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • feedwordpress 19:15:36 on 2018/11/28 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Writing and Grammar   

    Administrative Training Sources – Friends of Office Dynamics 

    We recently posted a blog that listed free training sources we provide;

    6 Free Training Sources for Administrative and Executive Assistants

    At Office Dynamics, it is our goal to elevate the level of the administrative profession through knowledge and training but that got us thinking, “What else can we do?”

    So, we are going to provide you with links to some of our friends that you can use for your professional and personal life.

    Enjoy!

     

    wordtrippers_grammer_course

    Word Trippers – Barbara McNichol

    Barbara and Office Dynamics have been working together to help improve the ability of the administrative and executive assistant with Barbara’s writing expertise.

    Barbara provides several different resources for you to enhance your writing ability and take you to the next level. Please visit her site and learn how you can improve your writing skills.

    Visit Word Trippers

     

     

    All Things Admin – Julie Perrine

    Julie Perrine is another affiliate of Office Dynamics that we just love to have around.

    Julie’s printed books, The Innovative Admin, The Organized Admin, and Become a Procedures Pro can be found in our Success Store.

    Another great source of information and knowledge!

    Visit All Things Admin

     

    Executive Secretary Magazine– Lucy Brazier

    With a history of cross-promotion, the Executive Secretary Magazine and Office Dynamics team have been working very hard to encourage the administrative field with forward progress and thinking.

    Lucy has a database of blogs, information, and education.

    Visit The Executive Secretary

     

    Admin to Admin – Lisa Olsen

    Lisa Olsen is not only the CEO of Admin to Admin but also the talented and entertaining emcee of multiple Office Dynamics Conferences.

    Admin to Admin offers a large selection of programs to learn from as well as the Admin to Admin Book Club!

    You would be missing out if you didn’t visit!

    Visit Admin to Admin

     

    AdminUniverse™ – Joanne Linden

    Joanne Linden is President and Master Trainer at AdminUniverse™ as well as an authorized user and training facilitator for the Star Achievement Series® created by Joan Burge, founder and CEO, of Office Dynamics International. We are very privileged to call Joanne and AdminUniverse™ our friends!

    AdminUniverse™ offers a great blog for admins to pull extensive knowledge from.

    Be sure to visit their website!

    Visit AdminUniverse™

     

     

     

    The post Administrative Training Sources – Friends of Office Dynamics appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 20:00:10 on 2018/11/20 Permalink
    Tags: , Writing and Grammar   

    Sprinkle Similes into Your Writing 

    Teaching a weekly fitness class—like writing weekly business messages—can get repetitious. A good instructor motivates action while guiding people in their exercises. My instructor likes to interject colorful similes to keep us going. I suspect it’s also her way of staying sharp and engaged, too.

    Here’s an example of her colorful use of language. Describing what not to do while on all fours, she said, “Think of an overburdened mule in a spaghetti Western movie and don’t slump your back like that.” Later, while on our tummies, she told us to lift our arms “like you’re jumping out of an airplane.” Great visual!

    Her imagery boosts our enjoyment while making the point of the exercise stick. What’s good for fitness is also good for your writing. Sprinkle similes and other figures of speech into your prose so readers can visualize your point more easily.

    Examples from a fitness class:

    “Drop your head to your shoulder like it’s a 10-pound bowling ball.”

    “Flatten your back like you could put a tray of food on it.”

    For over 50s who remember typewriters: “Shift your ribs to the side like the carriage on a typewriter.”

    Example from a book:

    This excerpt is from Martha Beck’s Finding Your Own North Star. I recommend Martha’s books for the sheer delight of seeing how she applies similes, metaphors, and other figures of speech to her points and stories.

    If you’re planning to wait for them [your family] to locate your true path, draw you a careful map, pack you a lunch, and drive you to your North Star, you might want to take up needlework. I hear it passes the time.

    Colorful similes lead to smiles. Use them in your business writing whenever you can!

     

     

    wordtrippers_grammer_course

    Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping administrative professionals add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource to quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through excellent weekly resources in your inbox, including a webinar, crossword puzzles, and a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks. Enjoy a $30 discount at checkout with the code ODI at www.wordtrippers.com/odi.

    The post Sprinkle Similes into Your Writing appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 18:00:54 on 2018/10/20 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Writing and Grammar   

    Look at Your Written Messages Through an Editor’s Lens 

    Whenever you write something—a report, proposal, or sensitive email—you naturally don a writer’s hat. But don’t stop there. You’re not finished! It’s time to scrutinize and then fine-tune what you’ve crafted.

    Start with this question: Does every word contribute to conveying your intended message?

    To answer it, be sure to reread your piece (three times or more) as if you’ve never seen it before. It’s akin to “thinking like an editor” by examining every phrase/sentence and asking:

    Is it NECESSARY?

    Is it CLEAR?

    Is it CONCISE?

    If you can’t confidently answer YES to these questions, pay attention to the following fixes and use them wherever it’s appropriate.

    NECESSARY: Be picky and picky again. Delete whichever elements don’t support the piece’s meaning.

    CLEAR: Ensure subjects and verbs agree; no mixing singular and plural. For example,

    • Incorrect: A group of writers were in town. (“Group” is singular while “were” is plural.)
    • Correct: A group of writers was in town. (“Group” is the subject here, not “writers.”)

    CONCISE: Whack wordiness by getting rid of extraneous phrases and words that add no value—e.g., really, some, great, very, that. Change these wobbly words to something specific and/or descriptive that gives readers more information. For example,

    • Let’s add some examples to the report.
    • Let’s add 12 examples to the report.

    By looking through your editor’s lens, you can make sure every word counts toward getting your message across.

     

    writing_tips

    Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping administrative professionals add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource to quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through excellent weekly resources in your inbox, including a webinar, crossword puzzles, and a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks. Enjoy a $30 discount at checkout with the code ODI at www.wordtrippers.com/odi.

    The post Look at Your Written Messages Through an Editor’s Lens appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:30:15 on 2018/09/14 Permalink
    Tags: Writing and Grammar   

    Don’t Leave Your Readers Guessing 

     

    Whether you’re writing an email, an article, a report, or a proposal, never leave your readers wondering what you actually want.

    Specifically, they shouldn’t have to wonder about these critical components of communicating:

    • Why have you told them this information?
    • What are they are supposed to do with it?

    It’s easy (and lazy) to say, “Give clear instructions and point readers to their next action.” But here’s a more concrete method.

    Use a planning tool called Setting Your Objectives that echoes the traditional journalism basics: Who, What, Why, Where, When, and How.

    Before you write the first sentence, answer each of these questions on paper as they apply to the written piece you’re crafting. The more detail the better . . .

    WHO: Target audience—Who will read this? What do you know about them already? Who will be affected by what your message says?

    WHAT: Message or takeaway, including call to action—What do you want the reader to do, think, believe, or remember as a result of reading your piece? E.g., Attend this important meeting. Consider this point of view. Review this proposal.

    WHY: Purpose and benefits—Why do the readers need this information? What’s in it for them? Why should they care?

    WHEN & WHERE: Logistics—What details need to be spelled out? If it’s an event or meeting, specify the time, location, and other essential facts.

    HOW: Style and tone—How do you want your reader to “hear” you? This is the most important one of all. Be intentional! E.g., polite, apologetic, excited, firm, demanding, laid back, urgent, or something else?

    Once you’ve thought through all of these, it’s smooth sailing. Why? Because your brain has already included the critical points and especially the two we started with:

    • WHY you have told them the information
    • WHAT they’re supposed to do with it.

    By consistently using this planning tool Setting Your Objectives, you’ll find you can craft your pieces more quickly and more completely than ever.

     

    Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping administrative professionals add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource to quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through excellent weekly resources in your inbox, including a webinar, crossword puzzles, and a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks. Enjoy a $30 discount at checkout with the code ODI at www.wordtrippers.com/odi.

     

    writing_tips

    The post Don’t Leave Your Readers Guessing appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:15:48 on 2018/07/24 Permalink
    Tags: , Writing and Grammar   

    Intentional Word Choice: Did You Write “Feel” When You Meant “Believe”? 

    Much of the spoken language slides into our writing, but at times the words we say aren’t the exact fit for what we mean. Check your intention every time!

    Consider these sentences from an article about education:

    • How many principals do what they feel will win approval?
    • The public feels certain people shouldn’t be teaching.

    Given the context, is “feel” the correct word to express the author’s meaning? No, because the essence of the intended meaning doesn’t come from an emotional “feeling” source. Rather, it comes from a conviction based on experience—a place of belief.

    Because of this, the better word choices would be:

    • How many principals do what they believe will win approval?
    • The public believes certain people shouldn’t be teaching.

    Your challenge: Question yourself when you select a commonly spoken word. Does it express the exact meaning based on its context?

    Specifically, from now on, designate “feel” a red-flag word. Is “feel” the most precise word to convey your intended meaning? If not, replace it with “think” or “believe” or “hope” or another verb until you find exactly the right one to say what you intend to convey.

    Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping administrative professionals add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource to quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through weekly resources in your inbox, including a webinar, crossword puzzles, and a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks. Enjoy a $30 discount at checkout with the code ODI at www.wordtrippers.com/odi.

    The post Intentional Word Choice: Did You Write “Feel” When You Meant “Believe”? appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
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