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  • feedwordpress 16:15:48 on 2018/07/24 Permalink
    Tags: , Writing and Grammar   

    Intentional Word Choice: Did You Write “Feel” When You Meant “Believe”? 

    Much of the spoken language slides into our writing, but at times the words we say aren’t the exact fit for what we mean. Check your intention every time!

    Consider these sentences from an article about education:

    • How many principals do what they feel will win approval?
    • The public feels certain people shouldn’t be teaching.

    Given the context, is “feel” the correct word to express the author’s meaning? No, because the essence of the intended meaning doesn’t come from an emotional “feeling” source. Rather, it comes from a conviction based on experience—a place of belief.

    Because of this, the better word choices would be:

    • How many principals do what they believe will win approval?
    • The public believes certain people shouldn’t be teaching.

    Your challenge: Question yourself when you select a commonly spoken word. Does it express the exact meaning based on its context?

    Specifically, from now on, designate “feel” a red-flag word. Is “feel” the most precise word to convey your intended meaning? If not, replace it with “think” or “believe” or “hope” or another verb until you find exactly the right one to say what you intend to convey.

    Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping administrative professionals add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource to quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through weekly resources in your inbox, including a webinar, crossword puzzles, and a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks. Enjoy a $30 discount at checkout with the code ODI at www.wordtrippers.com/odi.

    The post Intentional Word Choice: Did You Write “Feel” When You Meant “Believe”? appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 14:15:42 on 2018/07/17 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Writing and Grammar   

    Word Alert! Pompous Phrases Can Set an Arrogant Tone 

    arrogant_woman

    With the spoken word, we have the privilege of adding voice intonation, hand gestures, and emotion with our vocal cords. That doesn’t happen as easily in writing. You might leave readers guessing about your intended meaning and risk setting a tone that can be misconstrued.

    Does your writing come across as arrogant? Are you using pompous phrases? To avoid confusion, consider dropping the following idioms and phrases from your writing altogether. Not only will you convey your thoughts more directly, but your writing will gain clarity.

    Question using these suspicious phrases in your writing:

    • Not to mention . . . (then why mention it at all?)
    • It goes without saying . . . (then why say it?)
    • If I may say so . . . (it’s your writing; of course, you may say so)
    • I believe that . . . (it’s your writing; of course, you believe it)
    • In my humble opinion . . . (what makes it humble, anyway?)
    • To tell the truth . . . (you mean you weren’t telling the truth?)
    • To be honest with you . . . (you weren’t being honest before?)
    • For the record . . . (are we in court?)
    • Let me be perfectly clear . . . (followed by bafflegab)
    • This may sound stupid but . . . (it already sounds stupid)
    • With all due respect . . . (prefacing a negative comment this way doesn’t change it)

    One More Phrase: “In Other Words”

    Another oh-too-common phrase to question is “in other words.” Why? Because it often introduces a clarifying sentence that follows a mediocre one. Instead of adding a sentence, go back and strengthen the first sentence. Then you might not even need a follow-up clarifying one. Test this idea in your own work.

    Ultimately, you strive for clear, intentional expressions of your thoughts and beliefs in everything you write. Don’t let phrases such as these get in the way!

    Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping administrative professionals add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource to quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through weekly resources in your inbox, including a webinar, crossword puzzles, and a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks. Enjoy a $30 discount at checkout with the code ODI at www.wordtrippers.com/odi.

    The post Word Alert! Pompous Phrases Can Set an Arrogant Tone appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 22:00:50 on 2018/05/10 Permalink
    Tags: , Writing and Grammar   

    What IS the Difference Between “Since” and “Because”? 

     

    This request recently came my way: Barbara, I’d love to see you do an article on the difference between “as” and “since” and “because.” Here’s a summary of what my research told me.

    Both “because” and “since” imply cause, and they can be interchangeable when “since” means “for the reason that.” e.g., “Since my dog needs exercise, I take him for a walk.” e.g., “I walk every day because my dog needs exercise.”

    One source suggests using “because” when the reason is the most important part of the sentence and “since” or “as” when the reason is already well known and is less important. e.g., “The match was cancelled because it was raining.”

    I endorse this as an important distinction. I use it myself and recommend it to you. Here’s why.

    “Since” also refers to a time frame. But look at this example. “Since we ate lunch, we had lots of energy.” Do you see how this statement is ambiguous? Does it mean “from the time we had lunch” or “for the reason that we had lunch”?

    To avoid confusion, I recommend using “because” when your meaning relates to “cause” and “since” when it’s a factor of time. Keep the meanings distinct; it’s a good way to add clarity to your writing and power to your pen.

    For clarification of commonly confused words, download a free reference guide at www.WordTrippers.com/odi

    Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping administrative professionals add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource so you can quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through excellent weekly resources in your inbox, including a webinar, crossword puzzles, and a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks. You can enjoy a $30 discount at checkout by using the code ODI at www.wordtrippers.com/odi

     

     

    wordtrippers_grammer_course

    You can enjoy a $30 discount at checkout by using the code ODI at www.wordtrippers.com/odi

    The post What IS the Difference Between “Since” and “Because”? appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 14:00:55 on 2018/04/26 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Writing and Grammar   

    Are You An Aspiring Writer? 

    blogger

    Are you an aspiring writer? What about an aspiring writer involved in the administration field? Are you looking to add to your writing experience? Well, you’re in luck! Office Dynamics is looking to add a few guest bloggers that would love to share their ideas, knowledge, and creativity with our audience. Office Dynamics has always felt the importance of having YOUR voice heard and this is a great way for us to help! If interested, please send an email to eparedes@officedynamics.com along with 2 writing samples. The writing should focus on office life, the administrative field, or self-growth. Thank you and we can’t wait to hear from you!

    The post Are You An Aspiring Writer? appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 14:30:14 on 2018/04/13 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Writing and Grammar   

    Why Good Writing Skills Are Important In The Workplace 

    Why_Good_Writing_Skills_Are_Important_In_The_Workplace

    Do you ever find yourself asking “Why Good Writing Skills Are Important In The Workplace? Why home in (or is it hone in?) on the technicalities? Who notices? Who cares?

    Those who care about productivity, for one. Studies show that 6% of productivity in corporations is affected by poorly written communications. And that number is probably low. Still, it reflects the time wasted going back and forth, back and forth, to clarify messages that should have been clear, concise, and complete in the first place.

    Who else cares?

    Those who sign your paycheck. If your written missives are riddled with errors, you will likely fall short of getting the results expected and could be (or should be) forced to redo the work. Incorrect grammar, misused words, long-winded sentences—all too commonly found in business writing.

    Who else cares?

    The recipients of your message. Perhaps you expect them to take action on something as straight-forward as “attend this meeting,” but your message fails to convey the when, where, and/or why clearly. They’re not sure what to do; you’ve left them wondering about the meeting itself—and about your competence.

    Being impeccable in your writing is essential to doing your job well. The credibility and reputation you arduously build into your career is undermined when sloppiness gets through.

    As you strive for your best during this Administrative Professionals Month, take to heart the importance of a high level of competence in your written communications. You are judged by it constantly. The effort you make perfecting your grammar and writing skills will pay off in increased influence among those who do care.

    Be impeccable in your writing … always.

    Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping administrative professionals add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource so you can quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through excellent weekly resources in your inbox, including a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks.

    To celebrate Administrative Professionals Month, visit www.wordtrippers.com/odi during the month of April for a $30 discount on Word Trippers Tips.

    Good_Writing_Skills

    The post Why Good Writing Skills Are Important In The Workplace appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
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