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  • feedwordpress 22:00:50 on 2018/05/10 Permalink
    Tags: , Writing and Grammar   

    What IS the Difference Between “Since” and “Because”? 

     

    This request recently came my way: Barbara, I’d love to see you do an article on the difference between “as” and “since” and “because.” Here’s a summary of what my research told me.

    Both “because” and “since” imply cause, and they can be interchangeable when “since” means “for the reason that.” e.g., “Since my dog needs exercise, I take him for a walk.” e.g., “I walk every day because my dog needs exercise.”

    One source suggests using “because” when the reason is the most important part of the sentence and “since” or “as” when the reason is already well known and is less important. e.g., “The match was cancelled because it was raining.”

    I endorse this as an important distinction. I use it myself and recommend it to you. Here’s why.

    “Since” also refers to a time frame. But look at this example. “Since we ate lunch, we had lots of energy.” Do you see how this statement is ambiguous? Does it mean “from the time we had lunch” or “for the reason that we had lunch”?

    To avoid confusion, I recommend using “because” when your meaning relates to “cause” and “since” when it’s a factor of time. Keep the meanings distinct; it’s a good way to add clarity to your writing and power to your pen.

    For clarification of commonly confused words, download a free reference guide at www.WordTrippers.com/odi

    Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping administrative professionals add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource so you can quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through excellent weekly resources in your inbox, including a webinar, crossword puzzles, and a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks. You can enjoy a $30 discount at checkout by using the code ODI at www.wordtrippers.com/odi

     

     

    wordtrippers_grammer_course

    You can enjoy a $30 discount at checkout by using the code ODI at www.wordtrippers.com/odi

    The post What IS the Difference Between “Since” and “Because”? appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 14:00:55 on 2018/04/26 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Writing and Grammar   

    Are You An Aspiring Writer? 

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    Are you an aspiring writer? What about an aspiring writer involved in the administration field? Are you looking to add to your writing experience? Well, you’re in luck! Office Dynamics is looking to add a few guest bloggers that would love to share their ideas, knowledge, and creativity with our audience. Office Dynamics has always felt the importance of having YOUR voice heard and this is a great way for us to help! If interested, please send an email to eparedes@officedynamics.com along with 2 writing samples. The writing should focus on office life, the administrative field, or self-growth. Thank you and we can’t wait to hear from you!

    The post Are You An Aspiring Writer? appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 14:30:14 on 2018/04/13 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Writing and Grammar   

    Why Good Writing Skills Are Important In The Workplace 

    Why_Good_Writing_Skills_Are_Important_In_The_Workplace

    Do you ever find yourself asking “Why Good Writing Skills Are Important In The Workplace? Why home in (or is it hone in?) on the technicalities? Who notices? Who cares?

    Those who care about productivity, for one. Studies show that 6% of productivity in corporations is affected by poorly written communications. And that number is probably low. Still, it reflects the time wasted going back and forth, back and forth, to clarify messages that should have been clear, concise, and complete in the first place.

    Who else cares?

    Those who sign your paycheck. If your written missives are riddled with errors, you will likely fall short of getting the results expected and could be (or should be) forced to redo the work. Incorrect grammar, misused words, long-winded sentences—all too commonly found in business writing.

    Who else cares?

    The recipients of your message. Perhaps you expect them to take action on something as straight-forward as “attend this meeting,” but your message fails to convey the when, where, and/or why clearly. They’re not sure what to do; you’ve left them wondering about the meeting itself—and about your competence.

    Being impeccable in your writing is essential to doing your job well. The credibility and reputation you arduously build into your career is undermined when sloppiness gets through.

    As you strive for your best during this Administrative Professionals Month, take to heart the importance of a high level of competence in your written communications. You are judged by it constantly. The effort you make perfecting your grammar and writing skills will pay off in increased influence among those who do care.

    Be impeccable in your writing … always.

    Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping administrative professionals add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource so you can quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through excellent weekly resources in your inbox, including a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks.

    To celebrate Administrative Professionals Month, visit www.wordtrippers.com/odi during the month of April for a $30 discount on Word Trippers Tips.

    Good_Writing_Skills

    The post Why Good Writing Skills Are Important In The Workplace appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 17:17:04 on 2018/02/16 Permalink
    Tags: , Writing and Grammar   

    Be Impeccable with Your Emails 

    email_writing“Be Impeccable with Your Word”—one of the four agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz in his book The Four Agreements: A Practical Guide to Personal Freedom

    Here’s a twist on this agreement.

    In business, being impeccable with your “word” sent through email counts for a lot. After all, you want more than replies; you want results.

    To give you a greater chance of receiving what you need from each email you send, apply these five tips for composing messages impeccably.

    1. Write an effective subject line that concisely describes what the email is about. Include specifics telling recipients what to do (e.g., Attend meeting 3 p.m. Tuesday, Feedback on report by 4 p.m. Friday, etc.).
    2. Make the first statement of your email compelling—a callback, a question, a startling statistic (while skipping chats about the weather). With a strong opening, you have a greater chance the whole message will get read.
    3. In the body of the message, address recipients by name. Point out which issues pertain to them and what questions you want them to answer. Add a deadline if it’s appropriate.
    4. Because people usually scan content and don’t read word for word, use bullet points to make scanning easy and keep your text concise.
    5. Format your emails for ease of reading: short sentences, short paragraphs, spaces between paragraphs. If your message looks tedious to read on screen, it will get put aside.

    In the spirit of being impeccable with your words, try these ideas and reap the results you desire. Share your tips for being impeccable with your word here.

    Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping administrative professionals add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource so you can quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through excellent weekly resources in your inbox, including a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks. Details at www.wordtrippers.com/odi

    training_for_administrative_assistants

    The post Be Impeccable with Your Emails appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 18:00:36 on 2017/12/06 Permalink
    Tags: , Writing and Grammar   

    4 Ways to Ensure Readability in Your Writing 

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    by Barbara McNichol

    “Writings are useless unless they are read, and they cannot be read unless they are readable.” – Theodore Roosevelt

    If Roosevelt lived in today’s world, he might have known that 6% of the time wasted in corporations is due to poorly written communications. Of course, your goal is readability. At the same time, you desire to be fast and efficient. What techniques can help ensure your message is clear?

    Consider these:

    • One Thought, One Sentence
    • Rewrite Negative into Positive
    • Build Bridges to Guide Your Reader
    • End Sentences with Your Strongest Point

    One Thought, One Sentence

    As you might have learned in high school composition class, strive to express one thought in one sentence. You’d craft another sentence for the next thought, and so on. Also, medium-length or long sentences are fine on occasion, but you propel your prose forward with short, succinct sentences.

    Rewrite Negative into Positive

    It’s hard for readers to track what’s being written when it’s stated in a negative way. Often, negative statements require a lot more words to make a point. Avoid using “no” and “not” except when you want to emphasize or contrast something.

    Negative: We can’t incorporate all the design features without increasing the unit size.

    Better: To incorporate all the design features, we have to increase the unit size.

    Build Bridges to Guide Your Reader

    As you craft your message, use bridge words and phrases to keep your train of thought moving forward. Logical links build your case—the smoother the better.

    Here are examples of bridge words that . . .

    • connect two ideas of the same kind: and, plus, as well as
    • add another thought: besides, also, what’s more, besides, then, again,
    • compare or contrast ideas: but, still, however, yet, rather, likewise
    • reinforce an idea: indeed, in fact, of course, by all means
    • show results: as a result, consequently, thus

    End Sentences with Your Strongest Point

    Consider placing the most vital words at the end of your sentence. Doing so adds emphasis and bridges one idea to the next. Which of these sentence variations is stronger?

    • “You’ll enhance your ability to communicate clearly by using these four techniques.”
    • “Using these four techniques, you’ll enhance your ability to communicate clearly.”

    If you said the second, I’d agree. Leave readers with a benefit statement as the last idea they read. A subtle distinction, yes, but it helps strengthen your intention.

    How do you strive to improve readability in your writing? Share your ideas here.

    Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping administrative professionals add power to their pens. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource so you can quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through excellent weekly resources in your inbox, including a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks. Details at www.wordtrippers.com/odi. Word Trippers is 40% Off until 12/18/17.

    The post 4 Ways to Ensure Readability in Your Writing appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
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