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  • feedwordpress 08:00:21 on 2019/06/27 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Workplace   

    6 Things Bad Managers Will Fear but Great Leader Will Do 


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    Recently one of my clients, a leader of his own company, saw that one of his teams was not as enthusiastic as they used to be about their work and things were starting to slack. The team’s manager just shrugged and said they were a lazy bunch. That’s when my client called me in to help.

    A recent survey sheds some light on employee dissatisfaction: 69 percent of the people surveyed said they would be more satisfied if their employers better utilized their skills and abilities, and 59 percent felt their company viewed profits or revenue as more important than how people are treated.

    What this survey illustrates so profoundly—and what I’ve found to be true with my client’s team and in other companies I work with—is that people most often lose their passion for work because of how they are treated.

    Here are the suggestions I made to my client:

    Cut back on bureaucracy. Sometimes people lose enthusiasm because they’re so caught up in processes and procedures that feel like they spend their days just feeding the bureaucracy. When you can free them from unnecessary tracking and authorizations, they have the time and energy to connect with the work you hired them to do. Let them know they can lead where they are, with maximum empowerment and minimal red tape.

    Treat everyone as an owner. When you get rid of bureaucracy, you have to replace it with something—and the ideal solution is an entrepreneurial culture, a workplace where people feel they have a say in what is happening now as well as future directions. Get people to start feeling and thinking like owners. Many of my client’s managers objected to this suggestion—they had a lot of investment in the bureaucratic model—but he moved forward anyway. He held a town hall meeting and told each of his employees how important they were to him and that from that point on they should think of themselves as owners. “If you were running this business, what would you do, what ideas would you have?” he asked them—and then let him know that he genuinely wanted to hear their answers.

    Make information fully transparent. One of the biggest complaints employees have is being in the dark with decisions being made behind closed doors. If you expect people to act like owners, they need full access to information, with a clear understanding of the big picture, strategic goals, changes of direction, and what’s going on in the minds of management. They need to be brought to the table for input and be included in important conversations; they need to be invited into meetings and decision-making discussions.

    Let their voices be counted. It’s one thing to say you can drive and make decisions, but it’s another to listen and hear what someone has to say. Great leaders should always grant people a place to express themselves, a way for their voices to be heard and their questions to be asked, and then—this is the tough part—seriously address the issues that they bring up. When you allow people’s voices to count, you increase trust and bring back enthusiasm and drive.

    Follow their lead. If a team member comes up with a great new idea, get behind it and help them find the right people with the right skills to make it happen. Guide them and assist them when they need it but let them lead their own initiative. They’ll learn planning, delegation and management, and you’ll have a more valuable employee.

    Reward effort as well as progress. Everyone wants to be recognized for the work they do. It doesn’t matter what step of the ladder they’re on. As leaders and owners, we sometimes forget to acknowledge the hard work and the long hours, but those are things we should never take for granted.

    Many managers feel threatened by an entrepreneurial culture because they feel their authority has been limited. But leaders with the courage to take the leap soon learn that the more you empower your people the more powerful things can happen.

    Lead from within: Fearful managers restrict power; bold leaders empower people whenever they can.


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 6 Things Bad Managers Will Fear but Great Leader Will Do appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:58 on 2019/06/25 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , Workplace   

    How to Ask Someone to Be Your Mentor 


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    We all know how valuable a mentor can be. They can change your career, open up new perspectives, and help you reach the next level. But many people never take advantage of the benefits of a mentor, even though they really want one, for the simple reason that they don’t know how to ask.

    If you’re considering a mentor or working up your nerve to ask, here are some tips that can help:

    Start by thinking it through. Before you start selecting a prospective mentor, give some thought to what you want to accomplish and what kind of help you can use.

    Find a candidate. Identify a mentor who can help you with what you want to achieve. The ideal candidate is someone who has done something similar themselves, who has the expertise and knowledge you need. Think of the people you already know, and talk to colleagues who may be able to connect you with a wider network of candidates. As you think about possible mentors, consider their values and their style of leadership and communication to make sure they’re compatible with yours. And keep your options realistic: the CEO of a large corporation may be the person who feels like the best fit, but it’s not likely that they have time to devote to mentorship.

    Make the ask. Once you’ve identified the best candidate, it’s time to approach them. Don’t just walk up to someone and ask, “Will you be my mentor?” It might work, but it’s awkward and not the best path to a yes. Instead, try this technique, which has always worked for me: Say, “I really admire [something that stands out to you about their work] and was wondering if I could ask for your advice and guidance from time to time as a mentor as I [what you want to accomplish].

    Express gratitude. Once you have a response, whether it’s yes or no, express gratitude for their time and effort. You never know why they might be saying yes, and you can never judge the reasons why they may have said no. Whatever their answer and their reasons, a gracious response from you will build goodwill.

    Set up expectations. If the person does say yes, follow up to work through the details. Be sure that you and your mentor have a clear understanding of exactly what you want from the relationship, how much time it will take, and how often you will meet.

    Lead from within: A mentor can be immensely helpful. It’s important to find the right person and, once you do, to get the relationship off to a good start by asking in the right way.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Ask Someone to Be Your Mentor appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:29 on 2019/06/20 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Workplace   

    How Do You Know a Great Leader When You See One? 


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    As a speaker who talks on the subject of leadership to large groups and all kinds of different audiences, I am often asked if it’s possible to spot a great leader when you see one. And my answer is always the same: yes, it is.

    A truly great leader will stand out from a crowd—not because they have authority, and not because they have a title, but because of the quality of their character.

    For some reason, many of us have lost sight of character. It’s rarely an area of focus in books and classes on the subject of leadership. It’s often treated as an old-fashioned concept, maybe because we are surrounded by so many examples of poor character.

    But character will always be the central element of leadership, one that cannot be ignored or dismissed. It’s the foundation of greatness, because character is how we engage, how we choose, how we act, how we decide.

    Here are five important ways that character reveals itself in leadership:

    Integrity. A leader stands out from the rest when they lead with integrity, because integrity means they are honest and have a strong moral inner compass. It means that every word, every promise is backed by accountability.

    Humanity. Humanity reminds us that people are at the heart of leadership. It means leading with empathy and fairness, and it makes all the difference in building sustainable success for leaders and teams.

    Courage. A courageous leader—one who’s unafraid to challenge the status quo, who’s willing to take on discomfort and risk on behalf of their team—is able to lead people confidently into new territory and heights of success.

    Humility. Someone who leads with humility sees their role as allowing others to shine. Humility doesn’t mean thinking less of yourself but thinking of yourself less, and it’s the hallmark of the very best leaders.

    Transcendence. When a leader is equipped with transcendence they lead with optimism and purpose, which encourages others to see the bigger picture, to think in new and imaginative ways and produce excellence.

    If you aren’t consistently working to keep your character at the center of your leadership and your life, you risk losing a foundational element of genuine success. Guard your character always.

    Lead from within: Without character running through your veins as the source of your leadership, and without integrity as the internal GPS for navigating your life, you cut yourself off from the possibility of greatness.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How Do You Know a Great Leader When You See One? appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:45 on 2019/06/18 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Workplace   

    Learn to Master the Skills You Need to Lead 


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    As a leadership coach, I have found that leaders are usually measured more by who they are than what they do. Skills and reputation is incredibly important in leadership. And, as Warren Buffet once said, it takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it.

    No matter what great things you do, your leadership will be impaired if you’re not the person you should be and you are not doing what you should be doing. So what skills and attributes should a leader cultivate to build and to master their leadership? Here are the 10 that matter most.

    Self-awareness. The most respected leaders know who they are and what they are capable of achieving. Self-awareness allows you to see your own patterns and consider whether they’re serving you well. It helps keep you honest with yourself so you can lead from within.

    Integrity. Admired leaders don’t only talk about doing the right thing. Their actions match their words, and they do what is right, not what is easy. When they make a statement or decision, everyone believes that they will follow through. Integrity is the foundation of great leadership.

    Emotional intelligence. Intelligence and technical skills can take you so far, but it’s emotional intelligence that allows you to reach the top. Emotionally fit leaders are able to manage their stress levels without taking their emotions out on their team. They’re also more empathetic and understand what makes other people tick, which in turn makes them better able to motivate and inspire them.

    Communication. A respected leader is one who communicates well by email, on the phone, and face-to-face. People need to be able to grasp the purpose, the directions, and the end goal of any project in order for it to be completed successfully. Excellent communication skills are essential in establishing and maintaining a productive work environment.

    Decisiveness. A big part of being a leader is decisiveness. That means the ability to apply your knowledge and instincts to make sound decisions on the fly. It also means that once you’ve made up their mind, you don’t hesitate to commit. Leaders who are consistent in their decisions, who rarely second-guess or change their minds, generate trust—not only from their team but from everyone around them.

    Optimism. At the core of great leadership, leaders need to be champions for their organization and its mission, staying positive even in the face of setbacks. Leaders are most effective when they can stay motivated in tough times and remain positive when things go wrong, keeping their team’s spirits up and motivating them to keep achieving their best in any climate.

    Humility. There is no more powerful leader than one who shows humility in their character. Great leaders admit when they are wrong and take criticism as an opportunity for growth. They are able to show how grateful they are to be where they are, and they treat leadership as an opportunity for service, not an excuse for privilege.

    Delegation. Many leaders are perfectionists and have a hard time delegating, especially when they have a particular vision and are passionate about its execution. But the most effective leaders—those who truly understand what leadership is about—recognize that by delegating tasks to others, the workload is shared and team spirit thrives. They take care to assign the right task to the right person so that it can be completed correctly, effectively, and on schedule.

    Flexibility. When a leader understands that everyone is different, they can be agile and adaptable when needed. An essential skill for great leaders is having the ability to adapt their leadership style to diverse situations and needs, maintaining a focus on their team as well as the bottom line. Staying at the cutting edge of any industry requires flexibility and the ability to adapt quickly to all kinds of changes, within and outside the organization.

    Willingness to grow. I cannot stress this skill enough. Far too many leaders think the skills that got them there are the ones that are going to keep them there. But that is never the case. The best leaders are always coachable and teachable. They know they need support to stay on top and they need to grow to stay relevant as the world around them changes. Businesses want leaders with diversity and agility.

    Lead from within. Leaders must master many skills, those that keep your reputation intact are among the most important—not only for yourself but those you lead.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Learn to Master the Skills You Need to Lead appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:47 on 2019/06/17 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Texting, , Workplace   

    How to Tell Your Boss to Stop Texting You on the Weekend 


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    She was the sixth executive assistant to leave in the past year, and her boss—my coaching client—had no clue why he was losing so many employees. He kept telling me what a great leader he was. But as you’ve likely heard me say before, people don’t leave jobs, they leave leaders. To get to the bottom of the situation, I got permission from my client to talk with the six assistants who had left him.

    They didn’t need much encouragement—they were all eager to speak. And each of them cited the same issue: getting work texts on the weekend. Not just as an occasional thing in the face of a crisis or deadline, but constantly, as an extension of the work week.

    They all had similar responses:

    “If my boss is texting me, I need to reply immediately.”

    “If my boss is texting me, it makes me nervous and puts me on edge.”

    “If my boss is texting me, I feel I have to get the task done right away, because it must be important.”

    Before sharing the news with my client, I offered his former employees some coaching in case the situation came up again. Here are the strategies I shared them for dealing with a text-happy boss:

    Communicate up front. When you get hired, tell your boss, “I am available while at work, but once I am home, I value my time with my family, so unless it’s an emergency please don’t text me on weekends.”

    State expectations. As another approach, you can say “If you have a need to text me on the weekends, know that I probably won’t be able to respond right away, because the weekend is my time to regroup and reset.”

    Reinforce the message. If your boss doesn’t get the message and persists in texting you on the weekend, remind them of your policy with your actions—in other words, don’t answer until you’re back in the office on Monday.

    Manage the context. If the texts persist, respond with a simple message: “I will get to this on Monday.” Unless it’s an emergency, treat it as an opportunity to learn about managing relationships and maintaining boundaries.

    Train your boss. Work with your boss to establish such great communication during the week that they don’t feel the need to try to reach you on the weekends.

    Lead from within: Any boss will want to get the most of their employees. It’s the employees who need to draw appropriate boundaries and speak up when it’s too much.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Tell Your Boss to Stop Texting You on the Weekend appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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