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  • feedwordpress 08:00:27 on 2018/10/01 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Workplace   

    This is How Successful Leaders Build Great Teams That Last 

    If you want to build a team that will last, you have to build a team in which each person works from their strengths.

    Sadly, most people are not working in their areas of strength and therefore are not reaching their potential. The Gallup organization conducted research on 1.7 million people in the workplace. According to their findings, only 20 percent of employees feel that their strengths are in play every day in the work setting.

    What this means to me as an executive leadership coach is a failure of leadership. The most basic test of leadership is whether it helps people excel at what they do best and make their skills an asset to the company.

    It takes a special kind of leader, with unique competencies and skills, to successfully build great companies and teams. So how do successful leaders do it? Here are some pointers:

    Assess yourself. Before you can build a great team, you must be aware of your own leadership style and techniques. Are as effective as you think?  How accepting are people of your leadership?  You must be able to evaluate yourself and be critical about where you can improve, especially in areas that will benefit your team.

    Master the art of people. Make the time to get to know your team. You need to be able to answer the following questions: What are my people’s strengths and weaknesses? Are they growing? Do they have untapped potential? Is their attitude an asset or a liability? Do they love what they do, and are they doing it well?

    Build on people’s strengths. You can study the strengths of your people, but it’s just as important to communicate your findings. Let them know what strengths you see in them and what value their contributions bring. Teach them how each member of the team complements the others, and help them learn to work together more effectively. The more that people understand how they fit on a team, the more invested they are in making it work.

    Leverage their weaknesses. For team members to grow into their full potential, it’s important to address weaknesses as well as strengths. Empowering people to work on their weaknesses is one of the best things you can do for them. Show them that progress requires working on their whole selves, not just the things they’re good at.

    Communicate through feedback. Feedback is simply the art of great communication. Ideally, it’s not a separate undertaking but part of a natural dialogue. Keep it flexible, proactive and constant—don’t wait for a problem to occur.

    Celebrate the wins. Make sure your team feels encouraged and appreciated for what they accomplish by celebrating their achievements. In today’s fast-paced workplace, people rarely take the time to understand why they were successful and what it meant to those it affected.

    At the end of the day, to build a great lasting team requires a leader who has the ability to master the art of people—one who knows how each person thinks and how to best fit together their unique set of abilities.

    Lead from within: It takes great leadership to build great teams.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photos

    The post This is How Successful Leaders Build Great Teams That Last appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:31 on 2018/09/27 Permalink
    Tags: , Break The Rules, , , , , , Workplace   

    5 Important Leadership Rules You Can (And Should) Break 

    The greatest leaders in the world differ in many respects—different sexes, races, ages, and cultures, different styles, different goals—but among the things they all share is a willingness to break the rules.

    In my work as an executive leadership coach, I encourage my clients to be great leaders, revolutionaries even. While few of them would describe themselves that way, the best are willing to break any rules that stand between them and their goals.

    Here are some of the rules I most often encourage them to break:

    Treating everyone the same. We all tend to believe that fairness means treating everyone the same. But people all have different strengths and weaknesses and challenges as individuals—we are all different. Of course, it’s important to avoid favoritism. But part of leadership is recognizing each person’s motivation, style, and way of thinking, then working to help them become the best possible version of who they already are.

    Overpromoting people. If you have someone who’s great in sales, conventional wisdom will tell you to make them a manager. But no matter how well people perform in their current role, they won’t necessarily do a good job or be happy further up the ladder. Pay your people well for what they do and make their jobs rewarding in every way. But don’t promote them into leadership unless they have the aptitude and desire for it and they’re ready to make the move.

    Believing “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” If you want to maintain the status quo and keep plodding along the well-worn path, this rule belongs to you. Fixing things that aren’t broken is another way to say innovation, creativity, finding new solutions, always looking for a better way. Take Steve Jobs—he created products that we didn’t know we needed until they were in our hands. Technology wasn’t broken, but he fixed it anyway.

    Thinking you have to be smartest in the room. Over the years of my work with leaders, I can’t even count how many have told me they were the only ones in the room who could make decisions, because they weren’t sure their team was smart or capable enough to get it right. Conventional wisdom agrees that the leader needs to be the smartest—but that prevents you from building a strong team. Surround yourself with the smartest people you can find, and you’ll become smarter in the process.

    Trying to do everything alone. We all know the mythology of the lone wolf leader—the one who has all the answers, who never compromises, who doesn’t trust anyone else. In the real world, though, the best leaders know when to ask for help and make use of wise counsel. They know they can’t accomplish everything on their own and work instead to find the support system that will help them become the best leader they can be.

    Lead from within. Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like a leader.

     


    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photo

    The post 5 Important Leadership Rules You Can (And Should) Break appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:32 on 2018/09/25 Permalink
    Tags: , , Improvements, , , , , Workplace   

    This is How Great Leaders Are Constantly Improving 

    You must have a level of discontent to feel the urge to want to improve.

    Self-improvement is part of the human experience; we all have things we’d like to change about ourselves. And every leader knows you have to constantly adapt and improve if you want to achieve greatness.

    Whatever you’re working toward, it’s important to constantly assess, evaluate and appraise where you are and where you want to be. It’s something you do because you want to be a better leader—a better person—not only for your own sake but also for the sake of those who are loyal to you and work hard to achieve the vision and goals you set.

    Great leaders make self-improvement a daily practice. Here are some of the ways they go about it—see what makes sense for you and try incorporating it into your daily routine. Your leadership and your life will benefit.

    They assess themselves honestly. In order to improve, you need to know what needs improvement. Notice how you behave in different situations. Look at your behavior and attitudes objectively and you’ll know what to keep and what to leave behind. You can’t be a better person if you don’t know what you need.

    They educate themselves continually. Unsurprisingly, many leaders are avid readers. There is so much to learn and so much to understand, and reading a book is like having the best teachers and the smartest mentors from throughout history on demand.

    They welcome feedback approvingly. The best leaders understand that feedback is a gift, and they seek critique from trusted people who are able to get straight to the point. Direct feedback is the quickest way to learn how to improve.

    They embrace change repeatedly. Great leaders always want to improve themselves, so they remain open to change. They know it’s hard to move forward if you aren’t willing to change. Cultivate your own willingness to change with thought, effort and intentionality.

    They work toward their goals daily. The best leaders understand the power of consistently working toward a goal. If you can commit to one daily practice, make it this: do one small thing every day that will get you a little bit closer to where you want to go. Every time you accomplish a goal, you’ll learn more about yourself and figure out more ways of self-improvement.

    They ask for support frequently. Top leaders know the benefits of having good counsel and smart advocates, and even the best leaders may have a coach. I know one of the things my clients value most in my coaching is simply having an impartial sounding board, giving them a chance to sort things out before they present their ideas.

    They express appreciation regularly. Great leaders understand that gratitude is the basis of self-improvement. They know that if you can be thankful and appreciate what you have instead of obsessing over what you wish you had, you can focus on making yourself better and expressing your thanks to the people around you.

    Lead from within: In leadership it’s not as much about who you used to be as it is about who you choose to become.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photo

    The post This is How Great Leaders Are Constantly Improving appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:27 on 2018/09/24 Permalink
    Tags: , , Disagreement, , , , , Workplace   

    How to Disagree with Your Boss—And Still Have a Good Relationship 

    How many times in your career have you totally and wholeheartedly disagreed with your boss? It’s a tricky situation. You don’t want to hurt the relationship, but you want to do right by the company, client or customer, and you’re compelled to say something.

    So what’s the right approach? Here are some proven strategies I share with my coaching clients on how to disagree respectfully—and, in particular, how to disagree respectfully with someone who’s above you on the org chart.

    Gather feedback. Before you approach your boss, get feedback from someone you trust about your idea and how you can be more persuasive. Encourage them to poke holes in your theory and ask questions like . . . well, like a boss.

    Seek out expert opinions. Make sure you have advance contact with a subject-matter expert—someone recognized within your company or network for their knowledge of the topic. They’ll be able to provide you with a point of view you might not have thought of on your own.

    Rehearse your ideas. Practice your pitch with a few people you trust. If you you can’t get them to see your point of view, either try a different approach or consider hanging it up for a while.

    Be mindful. Once you’re ready to approach your boss, it’s important to be mindful. If the issue is something you feel strongly about, ask yourself whether it’s worth a fight if it comes to that. Remember, if you make everything combative you won’t have much to draw on when something truly important comes along. Make sure your opinions hold together logically; a clear-headed argument  is almost always better than a passionate one.

    Leave emotion out of it. Pull together data, charts, spreadsheets and any other hard evidence you can to support your point of view. Stick to the facts and don’t make it emotional.

    Listen to learn. Make it a point to listen to your boss, which is only respectful after your boss has listened to you. Most situations have something to teach everyone involved—maybe it will be you, maybe your boss, maybe both. In any case, you want to come across as someone who isn’t afraid to speak their mind but who’s driven by commitment to the organization.

    Evaluate to review.  When it’s all over, review and evaluate how well things went. Ask yourself how your role in these conversations has grown through the years. And if it didn’t go well, ask yourself what can you do better next time.

    Lead from within: Disagreeing with someone is not a bad thing. It’s how you disagree with that person, especially when it’s your boss, that matters.

    standards for hard work and integrity.

    Leadership may be hard to define and good leadership even harder, but if you can get people to follow you to the ends of the earth, rest assured—you are a great leader.

    Lead from within: Before you become a leader success is all about growing yourself; after, it’s all about growing others.


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post How to Disagree with Your Boss—And Still Have a Good Relationship appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:17 on 2018/09/20 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , Workplace   

    How to Stop Thinking Like an Imposter 

    The imposter syndrome is real and relevant.

    All of us at some point or another question our capabilities and competence. It’s easy to start down the path of wondering how you got hired or promoted over others and end up  waiting for people to discover how little you know or how lacking your skills are.

    It can happen to anyone—especially the smartest and most successful—but we live with our thoughts and have to be careful what we tell ourselves. And if you say too many self-effacing things out loud, you project a lack of confidence. Both the internal and external voices can do damage, and you need to shut them down.

    Here are the most common forms of imposter thinkingsee which are the most familiar to you and learn how to pivot your thinking.

    “I’m not as capable as they think I am.” This thinking is damaging not only to your self-esteem but also to your professional relationships. Think back to the last time someone in your workplace made a mistake or didn’t know an answer. Unless it’s a truly toxic environment, it’s unlikely that they were shamed and made to feel inferior for it. Trust your abilities, understand your limits and work to always know more.

    “I got this position because I was just in the right place at the right time. Someone else would do a better job.” Remind yourself how you got the job. If you were hired from outside, think about how hard you worked to prepare for the interview and how many people you beat out. If you were promoted, remember how hard you worked to earn it. Even if you were in the right place at the right time, don’t forget the unspoken part of that equation—you were there with the right preparation and the will to make it happen.

    “I don’t really like talking about it when I get a promotion or receive some kind of recognition.” Discomfort with being recognized for your accomplishments can stem from a sense of unworthiness—it’s not about the recognition but how you feel about yourself. Instead of dwelling on what you do and don’t deserve, focus on accepting what you have to offer and finding ways to use it productively.

    “I only got the assignment because everyone else was too busy.” Imposter syndrome can prevent you from seeing yourself as special in any way. You may be constantly telling yourself and others, “Oh, that was nothing. I’m sure anyone could have done it.” When this thinking strikes you, focus on doing your absolute best. Sure, lots of people can hit a baseball, but you’re the one who actually stepped up to the plate.

    “My success is nothing but luck.” If you attribute your accomplishments to luck, you may fear that you won’t be able to continue your success, which ties in to the idea that your achievements have nothing to do with your  competence or capabilities. Luck does play a role in every success story. If you’re reading this, for example, you’ve had access to education and technology—which puts you ahead of many people right out of the gate. Be grateful for your good fortune, but recognize too that what you’ve done with those gifts is equally important in your success.

    “It’s all my fault this didn’t turn out right.” Perfectionism and impostor syndrome often go hand in hand. The only cure for perfectionism is to remind yourself—as often as it takes—that perfection is a myth. If you’re human, you’re imperfect. Give yourself a break, acknowledge your imperfections, celebrate your wins and work on the things that you want to improve.

    “It’s all been a mistake.” The feeling that your success is in error is another way of discounting your own abilities and efforts. To help take ownership of your achievements, deconstruct them and think about all the learning and hard work that went into them. Those weren’t mistakes.

    Lead from within: The imposter within you has to start believing in yourself and stop thinking about what others are achieving if you want to succeed.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photo

    The post How to Stop Thinking Like an Imposter appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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