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  • feedwordpress 08:00:13 on 2019/04/30 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , Workplace   

    10 Guaranteed Ways That Can Get You Fired 


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    Nobody starts a new job hoping to be fired. The most important thing, of course, is to do good work without making trouble—but there are lots of factors that can make or break your success. Here are ten of the most common missteps that get people fired:

    Lying on your job application. Many people inflate their qualifications a bit on job applications, and the usual assumption is that once you get the job, all that matters is how well you perform. But most companies now have a zero tolerance policy for dishonest applications, and discovery of a false statement is enough to get you fired even if you’re doing a great job. And if there are inconsistencies between what you’ve said you can do and your performance on the job—for example, if you’re struggling with a piece of software or equipment you’ve said you know how to use—your entire application may get a second, closer look.

    Disrespecting leadership. If you disrespect those in charge, you shouldn’t be surprised if they ask you to leave. The attitude you bring to the workplace, the respect you give, and your happiness in your work are largely your choice, so choose wisely.

    Slacking off on the job. No one wants a slacker on their team or in their company. If you’re not making the effort and maintaining a strong work ethic, there’s a good chance that you won’t be around long. Make sure you behave today in ways that your future self will thank you for.

    Not being a team player. To do most jobs effectively requires the cooperation, support and goodwill of those around you. Becoming detached from those you work with could get you replaced with someone who can work well with others. Whatever your personal feelings about people, make it a point to build and maintain good working relationships with everyone on your team.

    Keeping toxic company. If you spend most of your time with complainers, gossipers and grumblers, you’re casting yourself in a bad light. Even if you aren’t engaging in the complaints and gossip, you will be judged by the company you keep. If you associate with toxic people, you’ll quickly be considered toxic yourself.

    Leading from your ego. A healthy ego is a good thing to have, but that doesn’t mean insisting that you’re always right or that your way is the only way to get something done. An ego that gets in the way of efficiency and teamwork can earn you an invitation to leave.

    Taking credit for other people’s work. if you are someone who never presents an original thought at work but takes credit for other people’s accomplishments, you will likely find yourself out the door. Even if you get away with it for the moment, you can’t build success by taking credit for what others have done.

    Not taking responsibility. When you make a mistake, admit it right away. The truth will almost always come out in time, and failing to hold yourself accountable just brings additional negative attention. And if you compound the problem by trying to blame your error on technology, a time crunch or the actions of others, you’ll almost certainly be seen as someone the organization would be better off without.

    Drinking on the job. One of the quickest ways to be shown the door is to drink on the job. Know your organization’s rules and expectations. Having a drink at dinner with a client is one thing, but pulling out a bottle from your desk drawer or having beers for lunch is another. Being a productive member of a team requires focus and sobriety.

    Indiscreet job hunting. If you’re looking for a new job, don’t send your resume from your work computer or use the office printer and paper. Emails are often monitored, and using company resources for your job hunt (or any personal business) is a firing offense in many workplaces.

    If you’re like most people, you start a new job with the best of intentions. If you think of being fired at all, it’s as something that happens to those who get caught in incompetent or grossly unethical behavior. But if you don’t mind your steps, you may be the one who is asked to go.

    Lead from within: To avoid being fired, take complete responsibility about who you are and what you do in the workplace.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 10 Guaranteed Ways That Can Get You Fired appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 04:40:39 on 2019/04/25 Permalink
    Tags: , , Insecurity, , , , , , Workplace   

    10 Signs You May be an Insecure Leader (and How to Be More Confident ) 


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    At some point in our lives and our leadership, we all experience insecurity. And when we act out of that insecurity we tend to behave badly, sometimes harming our relationships and reputation in the process. Especially for leaders, insecurity affects not only ourselves but also those around us.

    Because when an insecure leader thinks everything is about them as a result, every action, every choice, ever decision is put through the filter of their own self-centeredness, which doesn’t really serve others well.

    Here are 10 of the top signals that insecurity may be damaging your leadership. If any of these sound familiar, stop the behavior and work through the issues before major consequences result.

    You become defensive when challenged. When an insecure leader feels they’re being challenged or confronted, their first response is to feel they’re in the wrong—and to avoid that discord they quickly become defensive. Learn to welcome direct, honest communication even if it’s not what you want to hear; make peace with the fact that you will sometimes get it wrong.

    You micromanage. Insecure leaders like to control everything, even how other people do their work. They feel the more control they have the less likely they’ll be faced with a better way. Instead, give autonomy to your team and allow them to show off their talents and strengths.

    You’re not interested in feedback. Insecure leaders get annoyed when their team members or colleagues want to give them feedback. They see it as a confrontation and respond with fear and dismissal. Become familiar enough with your own strengths and weaknesses to take criticism in stride.

    You refuse to explain your decisions. Insecure leaders fear that the rationale for their decision may not hold up well, so they communicate decisions with no underlying explanation. Explain your decisions and the reasons behind your thinking so others can understand and trust your choices.  

    You stop listening to other people’s opinions. Insecure leaders see asking questions, seeking advice and listening to the opinions of others as a sign of weakness. They don’t want to be perceived as needing help. Emulate confident leaders by being willing to listen and learn from the opinions of others. In time you’ll realize that it’s actually a sign of strength.

    You always have to have final word. Insecure leaders need to be seen as always winning—even in an honest difference between two sound opinions. Learn to value the thoughts of others, especially in areas you need to know more about.

    You get angry when a team members resigns. Insecure leaders see any departure as a reflection on their leadership, so they respond in anger and focus on the faults of the person who’s leaving. When you lose a valued team member, take stock and ask yourself whether there’s anything you should do differently to keep your best people happy and productive.

    You blame others. When things go wrong, an insecure leader will never take responsibility but will always blame others first so they can avoid thinking about the possibility that they did something wrong or made a bad decision. Work to be secure enough in your leadership to say, “I messed up—let’s go make it better now.”

    You take credit for your team’s achievements. Insecure leaders like to take credit for other people’s work—not because it makes them feel better, but because it makes them seem indispensable and helps ease their fears of being unnecessary or unworthy. Emulate the great leaders who know success takes a team, and be quick to praise and recognize the achievements of others. (By the way, that’s also the best way to make yourself look good.)

    You don’t promote or develop your best people. Insecure leaders want to protect themselves at all costs, and they see the smartest and highest-achieving people around them as threats. They hand out titles only to those they believe will never question their authority or outshine them. As a leader, the best success you can achieve is the success of your people.

    We all have moments of insecurity. But if any of these descriptions sounds like you, you need to act quickly to change directions. If you can’t do it on your own, recruit the help of a coach or mentor—someone who can help you become more confident in who you are. Left unchecked, your insecurities will affect not only you but also everyone you lead.

    Lead from within: An insecure leader must become big enough to admit their mistakes, smart enough to correct them and strong enough to embrace them.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 10 Signs You May be an Insecure Leader (and How to Be More Confident ) appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:36 on 2019/04/23 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Workplace   

    7 Things Every Leader Needs to Quit Doing Immediately 


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    Coaching as many leaders as I have, there are patterns that emerge—and there are times it’s apparent, from the perspective of an outsider, that certain actions are not going to lead to the desired results.

    I consider it part of my job to help leaders avoid unnecessary struggle. It’s in that spirit that I present some things you need to quit doing immediately—not because I say so but because they will not serve you in the way you think they will.

    If you’d rather learn these lessons the hard way, that’s your right. But for those who are open to advice from someone who’s witnessed a lot of leadership situations, good and bad, here’s the list of things you need to quit doing (or avoid starting):

    Comparing your success to that of others. Your leadership will never be like anyone else’s, and your journey is all your own. You will likely be successful in ways other leaders aren’t and you will fail as others might not. The goal of your leadership should be to be the best leader you can be, and the only accurate way to measure your success is against your own ideals and self-awareness.

    Running from your problems. If you can’t face your own problems head on, you can’t lead others in their own struggles. To be a great leader, you must first build understanding by struggling with your own problems and issues. That experience is what will ultimately shape you into the leader you were meant to become.

    Trying to be popular. If you want to be popular, you cannot be a leader. If you want to be a leader, you have to be willing to do the hard work, have the difficult conversations and take the major risks that make it all but impossible to be popular. Leadership can be risky at times—be prepared.

    Being indecisive about what you want. You can never leave where you are until you decide where you would rather be. Decisiveness is everything when it comes to being successful in leadership. Make a decision about what you want, then pursue it with passion and determination.

    Pretending you have all the answers. It’s important to remember that you don’t have to know everything. The sooner you admit you don’t have all the answers, the quicker those around you will be willing to help you fill in the gaps.

    Going it alone. Leadership can be lonely, but it doesn’t mean you have to lead alone. The best leaders surround themselves with people who hold them accountable for their actions and help strengthen their character. If you have a tendency to isolate yourself, make it a practice to connect with others who will support you.

    Trying to be everything to everyone. One of the greatest challenges of leadership is wanting to always do more. But trying to be everything to everyone is impossible and will just burn you out. Don’t allow yourself to flounder in the weeds trying to meet everyone’s expectations. Instead, believe in yourself and in others, and help inspire people to work toward their own priorities.

    Lead from within: There are many lessons to be learned in leadership. Whenever possible, try to avoid learning them the hard way and quit them before they stop you.

     

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 7 Things Every Leader Needs to Quit Doing Immediately appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:30 on 2019/04/18 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Workplace   

    10 Ways to Make Sure People Love Working For You 


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    If you want people to love working for you, it’s important that you keep them happy. Many studies and workplace reports show that employee happiness has a direct tie to the bottom line.

    Happy people are more creative, innovative and dedicated than their unhappy counterparts. And they are more likely to be loyal and responsible and to stick around for a long time.

    It’s the very definition of a win-win situation. And the best way to make it happen is to create an environment and culture that foster employee happiness. Here are some of the most important things you can do:

    Make people feel important. When you create an environment in which people feel important, it becomes a place where they want to spend more time. When people know they matter and believe they are contributing in ways that make an impact, they want to stick around and follow the leader who makes them feel significant.

    Let people know they’re being heard. It sounds simple enough, but it’s something many leaders don’t bother to do. People want to know someone is listening—really listening. Being heard means that when problems are uncovered, people work together and take action to fix the issues, and it’s an important part of happiness at work.

    Deliver praise and appreciation often. Everyone wants to be appreciated and recognized for their efforts, but when things get frantic—as they often do—leaders too often forget the power of simple words like “thank you,” “I appreciate you,” and “I value the work you’re doing.” These simple phrases can be a game changer for how people feel about your leadership.

    Make work fulfilling. Everyone wants their work to have a purpose. For people to feel good about the work they’re producing, they need to believe it’s part of something meaningful. It’s your job as their leader to make sure they know what that looks like. Allow people to see the inner workings of the organization from all angles and perspectives. When you do, they feel better connected and more committed to its mission. Success by itself doesn’t breed happiness—it’s the other way around.

    Prioritize work-life balance. It is important that people understand you value them as a person. One powerful way to make that happen is to make work-life balance a clear priority. You may want to let people work from home on Fridays, provide discounted child or elder care, or find other incentives that improve people’s overall quality of life. Attention to work-life issues shows you care about your people—at work and away.

    Encourage wellness. Encouraging people in wellness and health by supporting positive steps in areas like exercise, diet and meditation will create a lot of happiness. People often work too hard and for too many hours. As a result, they don’t feel well and may become unhappy. Encouraging wellness says you care the people on your team.

    Engage in meaningful dialogue. It’s important to engage in meaningful conversations—not only about work but also about deeper issues and what’s going on in people’s lives. Meaningful dialogue connects people in profound ways, and more connected people are happier at work.

    Refrain from micromanaging. Employees who feel trusted and supported, without being hovered over, are more relaxed and confident in the work  they do. When you’re tempted to micromanage, remember why you hired your team and trust them to make the right decisions without interference. Giving people the freedom to do their jobs as they think best will keep their confidence high, adding to the success of your organization.

    Be accessible and available. If your door is always closed and your tone says “Do not disturb,” people will feel disconnected from the person whose thoughts, opinions and guidance they most need. People want to know that their leader is invested in them. When you are accessible and available, you send a clear message that people can count on you and you’ll be there for them.

    Help them grow and develop. There’s no better way to show you care about your people and you’re serious about investing in them as individuals than to foster their personal and professional can growth and development. Your support and encouragement show that you believe in them, you recognize their potential and you want them to succeed as individuals.

    Lead from within: If you want people to love working for you, show them the love they deserve and make them happy.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 10 Ways to Make Sure People Love Working For You appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:23 on 2019/04/16 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , Weak Leadership, Workplace   

    7 Habits of Weak Leaders (and How Not to Be One)  


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    Just as positive habits create strong leaders, bad habits can and will create weak leaders.  Here are seven habits to be especially mindful of. If you’re practicing even one of them, start working immediately to replace it with a positive habit before your leadership weakens and suffers major damage.

    Holding to a double standard. Weak leaders are in the habit of saying one thing and doing another. They believe it’s fine to set rules for others, but they hold themselves exempt. Consistency between word and deed is a major factor in successful leadership, and part of being a leader is knowing that people are watching you at every step and taking their cues from your behavior.

    Lack of vision or strategy. Weak leaders have a habit of not thinking beyond the scope of today. They may deal with immediate issues and concerns, but overall they’re comfortable with the status quo. They’re the ones who say, “If it’s not broken, don’t fix it.” This shortsightedness causes others to similarly focus on tasks instead of the visioning and strategic planning that will move the organization and its mission forward.

    Poor communication. It’s impossible to be a strong leader with poor communication skills. If you can’t communicate, you can’t connect with others—much less provide engagement and transparency. The ability to speak, write and above all listen effectively is among the most important leadership skills.

    Isolation. If you hold yourself inaccessible and unavailable, sitting in your office with the door closed, you send a clear message to others that you’re unwilling to engage. The message it sends isn’t one of leadership but of privilege and insecurity.

    Failing to develop others. A weak leader focuses solely on getting the job done instead of using the job as a way to help their people develop new competencies and skills. It’s an ineffective leader who keeps their people playing small without investing in them, whether it’s through neglect or because they see others as a threat.

    Resistance to improvement. Every great business is constantly growing and evolving. Leaders who resist change and improvement are arrogant or complacent—and sometimes both. They believe things are fine as they are and aren’t interested in moving to the next level or positioning for the future.

    Lack of interest in inspiring others. The best leaders know how to energize people and inspire them to reach higher levels of performance and potential. Those who can’t are probably uninspired themselves, and it’s virtually impossible to build a great team with an uninspired leader.

    Being a strong leader requires equal amounts of self-awareness, self-management and humility. Spend some time reflecting on any bad habits that may be limiting your leadership potential and resolve to take steps now to reverse them.

    Lead from within: A single bad habit, left unchecked, can be enough for your leadership to weaken and fail.

     

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 7 Habits of Weak Leaders (and How Not to Be One)  appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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