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  • feedwordpress 08:00:57 on 2020/05/12 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , Open Door Policy, Workplace   

    Leave Your Door Open When You’re Leading Remotely 


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    In my work as a leadership coach, I spend an enormous amount of time with top corporate leaders and successful entrepreneurs. One trait that the best of them seem to share is an open-door policy. They hold a strong commitment to their people and want to make sure, no matter how busy they are, that they’re available and easily accessible to anyone on their team who needs support, is struggling to solve a problem, or has a great idea.

    An open-door policy is a great leadership practice at any time, but it’s even more important when your people are scattered and working remotely. Whether your open door takes the form of a video conference feed, a text or phone line, or another mode of communication, here are some of the top ways it can help the people on your team:

    Alleviate their anxiety. When people are fearful, it helps them to know that the person in charge is there to help talk them through their anxiety. An effective leader can tap into what their people are thinking and feeling and guide them toward positivity—a skill that’s never more important than when your team is working through a challenging crisis.

    Help them navigate outside their comfort zone. It’s enormously stressful for employees when suddenly everything about their job is different: how they accomplish their work, how documentation and communication are handled, how time and achievements are tracked. Faced with this situation, many people try to muddle through, acting as if nothing has changed. Having a leader who can lend clarity and purpose is critical, especially when it’s time to begin looking ahead toward building more sustainable new processes.

    Support them through stress. Left unmanaged, stress can do all kinds of things to harm focus and productivity. In the past you might have had one or two people going through a stressful circumstance, but at a time when every single person on your team is facing additional stress at the same time, your presence and planning are required to keep the effects from spiraling out of control. An open door is an important part of helping people feel supported and hopeful.

    Keep them motivated. In the early days of a crisis, people are energized and focused, willing to do whatever it takes to meet the immediate need. But when the crisis lingers longer than anyone expected with no clear end in sight, people begin to feel discouraged and exhaustion sets in. The ear and voice of a strong leader are necessary to help them pivot back to productivity and keep them moving forward.

    Everywhere we turn right now, someone is saying “we’re here for you” and “we’re all in this together.” It’s far more meaningful to show your support, and the best way to do that is by being available and accessible when your people need you.

    Lead from within: The leader’s availability is the difference between a team feeling supported or not supported.

     

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Leave Your Door Open When You’re Leading Remotely appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 12:22:45 on 2020/05/05 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , Workplace   

    How The Best Leaders Are Already Planning Past The Crisis 


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    When a crisis disrupts the usual order of things, leaders can’t settle for just dealing with what’s in front of them today. They need to immediately begin looking ahead and planning for the future to make sure they’re prepared for what comes next—even if they have no idea what shape it will take.

    It may feel like a time to sit and wait, but in fact it’s a time to be proactive about the future—yours, your team’s, and your organization’s. Here’s how you can emulate the best leaders in planning through crisis.

    Brainstorm. Gather the sharpest minds and most insightful thinkers in your organization to discuss what the next months and years may look like. Spend time together exploring a range of scenarios and tracking for each of them how you can move the business and its people beyond the crisis.

    Discover opportunities and threats. In the discussion of each possible scenario, include a big-picture assessment of possible opportunities and threats, grounded in awareness that the crisis is changing not only your organization but also your industry and your customers.

    Create certainty about priorities. You can empower people through uncertainty if you hold true to the values and priorities that drive your team’s mission and communicate those values and priorities clearly and often. When everything is shifting, people need a North Star to navigate by.

    Lead with speed and agility. In unpredictable times you don’t have the luxury of playing wait and see—you must be proactive and able to move quickly and confidently in a new direction, with the willingness to pivot and make adjustments as events unfold.

    Learn from the present while planning for the future. As a crisis is unfolding, you’re learning something new in every moment. Make sure the most current information and trends are reflected in your strategic planning.

    Gain commitment from your people. Especially if you’re faced with moving in a new direction, your people need to fully commit to the vision and plan. That means it can’t be a top-down initiative—their voice and involvement are an important part of the process. Leadership based on collaboration and not control—trusting that people are smart and know what to do—fosters the commitment and energy your team needs to tackle the crisis and to continue a journey of growth when it’s over.

    Connect vision to mission. Any new vision must meet two criteria: it must be inspiring and it must be tightly aligned with your organization’s purpose.

    It’s easy in difficult times to become paralyzed by the day-to-day challenges. But it’s the leaders who think ahead with courage and vision who will achieve long-term success.

    Lead from within: The best leaders are always building on what is happening today to create successful future. When crisis hits, they keep their fears to themselves but share their courage and vision with others.

     

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How The Best Leaders Are Already Planning Past The Crisis appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:34 on 2020/05/05 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Workplace   

    The One Aspect Of Crisis Management That No One Talks About 


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    Some people are more suited to crisis leadership than others. Many hunker down and hope they make it through. Others are bold and dynamic, always driven to stay a step ahead of events.

    But throughout the spectrum, there is one aspect of crisis management that no one is talking about. Whatever your approach, you must stay aware of your people.

    What’s happening today is effecting every person on your team at a deep level. And if you want to stay successful as a leader, you need to address those changes.

    Here are some of the ways your people are likely reacting:

    Some go into deep into action mode. Many people think that if they stay busy and are in constant motion, they won’t have to address what is happening around them. So they go into action mode. Some of my clients are now working 16-hour days just to keep moving.

    Some are angry and don’t even know it. People may be feeling frustrated—about change, about uncertainty—unaware that underlying that frustration is anger. Anger happens when frustration isn’t being addressed. A massive crisis that changes nearly every aspect of life with no clear end in sight is a perfect example of a situation that can cause deep-seated anger.

    Many are mourning what used to be. People are likely to be mourning their old lives and wishing things could go back to what used to be. Some may be grieving for long-awaited events, family gatherings and celebrations that have been canceled. Others may have lost a friend or family member. When people are grieving, emotions such as guilt, despair, fear and anxiety are common.

    Most are reflecting on their lives. Crisis often triggers inner turmoil, because it takes away the noise of everyday distractions and gives people a clear look at their life from a new perspective. They may be asking themselves, Am I where I need to be? Is this what I thought I would become? Is this giving me the joy I was looking for? And the answers may change their future direction.

    If you aren’t recognizing what is happening to your people and communicating with empathy and understanding, you may be facing a bigger crisis within your organization than you realize. Leading in a crisis is not about just having an action plan and implementing it for success. It’s about acknowledging your people and accepting that they’re likely to be going through things that will take them some time, and maybe help, to work thorough.

    As a leadership coach, I have seen countless organizations in crisis, and I know the price of ignoring its human dimension. if you want to keep your most talented and capable people, address the issues they’re struggling with.

    Lead from within: Crisis management is not only about having a plan for the future; it is recognizing your people for who they are and what they need from you as a leader.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: istockphoto

    The post The One Aspect Of Crisis Management That No One Talks About appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 11:00:00 on 2020/04/30 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , Workplace   

    Why Are Smart Leaders So Dumb At Motivating People 


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    According to a recent Gallup poll, only about 25 percent of American employees say they are engaged in their work. A near majority, 43 percent, admit they’re checked out.

    These results are startling. Why are so many people feeling disconnected at work? The sad truth is that even the smartest leaders don’t always know how to motivate their people. So what can you do to buck the trend and keep your employees engaged? Here are some thoughts:

    Stop motivating with rewards and start inspiring with purpose. Many leaders think that if you hand out rewards people will be happy, but that’s not necessarily the case. People are driven by a purpose, a connection to the mission of their team and organization that helps them understand the importance of their role.

    Stop motivating with perks and start inspiring with a greater cause. Usually when morale is low, it’s situational, because something’s going on that makes people feel frustrated and tense. But when people are connected to a cause greater than themselves, they have a different mindset. By thinking of themselves as part of something bigger, they can overcome day-to-day frustrations and move forward positively.

    Stop motivating with compensation and start inspiring with growth and development. Most leaders think the more you pay people the happier they are. While it’s true that people who are paid what they’re worth are happier than those who aren’t, what really makes a difference is when that compensation is viewed as part of an overall investment in their professional growth and development. People get excited about their work, and their employer, when they’re treated as a worthy investment.

    Stop motivating with words and start inspiring with actions that matter. Many leaders are terrific with words. They’re able to fire people up with great speeches, but ultimately none of it matters if their actions don’t match their words. It is the leader who follows up with action that inspires others, even if they’re not the most eloquent.

    There’s a big difference between motivation and inspiration, sometimes called intrinsic motivation by leadership theorists. They’ve known for a long time that motivating people by dangling carrots doesn’t work, but it’s a mindset that remains deeply ingrained in our business culture. It’s not hard to see, though, that it isn’t serving us well. If it were, we wouldn’t have so many employees who feel disconnected and demotivated.

    Humans don’t do their best work under conditions of external reward, but when they’re inspired by the purpose and meaning of what they do.

    So if you want to stop motivating your people the wrong way, lead with the kind of motivation that allows people to feel there is purpose, meaning and a higher calling for what they do.

    Lead from within: Be the kind of leader who really gets their people and understands what motivates them to come to work and do what they do every day.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Why Are Smart Leaders So Dumb At Motivating People appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:35 on 2020/04/30 Permalink
    Tags: Arrogant, , , , , , , , Workplace   

    If Humility’s So Important, Why Are So Many Leaders So Arrogant 


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    The importance of humility is practically a cornerstone of leadership. So why are so many leaders so arrogant?

    Anywhere leadership is being discussed and defined, humility is a key concept. It shows up in books and articles and at leadership conferences around the world. But clearly many leaders are not embracing the concept—at least not for themselves. As a leadership coach, I have the privilege of access to a wide range of leaders at every level, affording me a good perspective on broad issues. Here’s what the leaders I know are telling me about humility:

    Humility isn’t even in the top ten qualities of great leaders. I’ve argued this point many times. A leader says, “If you think of the top ten skills of a leader you never see humility.” My response: Even if you don’t see the word, you definitely see what humility stands for. As a leader, you show humility when you listen and care about others. It’s about placing yourself in someone else’s shoes—not a quality to take lightly. Arrogance means giving yourself credit and power, but humility believes in bringing out the power within people.

    Humility is a form of weakness. An important reason that leaders don’t embrace humility is the idea that it comes across as weak—and no one wants to be thought of as weak. It’s that same fear of being seen as weak that drives arrogant leaders to put themselves and their personal agendas ahead of organizational objectives and the common good. Those who lead with humility, on the other hand, work to support, inspire and develop others. They teach others the best of what they know and they help others achieve. It’s the ultimate form of strength.

    Humility gets a bad rap. Traditional leadership thinking dictates that we can’t be humble and confident at the same time. The assumption among too many executives is that competition—between companies, between teams and between individuals—leaves no room for recognizing or practicing humility. But in truth there is a core of humility in every genuinely confident leader. They don’t have to lead with arrogance to get people’s attention.

    At the end of the day, no one likes dealing with arrogant leaders. Even if they come across as strong or powerful, they are rarely accorded trust or respect. Arrogant leaders suffer from an overinflated ego—they believe they matter most.

    Those who lead from humility and fearlessness don’t have to lead with their ego. They never feel the need to bully others, sideline their competitors or take credit they haven’t earned. They know who they are and therefore they’re not afraid to shine the light on others.

    Lead from within: The biggest difference between humility and arrogance is that  a leader who leads with humility is focused on serving others, while an arrogant leader is focused on being served by others.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: istockphoto

    The post If Humility’s So Important, Why Are So Many Leaders So Arrogant appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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