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  • feedwordpress 22:00:37 on 2018/05/06 Permalink
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    Meeting New People as an Administrative Professional 

     

    conference reception for networking

    Meeting new people as an Administrative Professional is cool! Think about all the people you have met because of the people you support and where you work. Where else would you meet such a broad range of individuals? Many executive assistants and administrative assistants work with a variety of cultures. Even in my “good” old days as an executive assistant, I worked with people from Italy, Switzerland, Germany, and France.

    In our company, we have been so fortunate to meet administrative professionals from Russia, Japan, Italy, and Qatar.

    Then think of all the high-caliber people you have met through your executive or organization. Do you ever stop and think about how fortunate you are to have met such a repertoire of people? What about any local networks you have developed through your job?

    Do you ever stop to think how fortunate you are to meet so many diverse individuals because you work in the administrative profession? How many people would you not know if you didn’t work in the administrative profession—or for the executive you support? Are you showing an interest in others? Do you extend yourself to learn about people even though they don’t think just like you? Do you try to know the people your executive knows? Do you display a good attitude with everyone you meet? Is your network vast?

    Be Cool! Get to know others — you may learn something new — and you never know who they might know that you need to know!

     

    joan_burge_signature

    Joan Burge
    Founder and CEO

     

     

    The post Meeting New People as an Administrative Professional appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 20:00:19 on 2018/05/01 Permalink
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    Before You Retaliate 

    before_you_retaliate

    Before you retaliate

    It’s almost instinctive to yell back or to be offended at someone who is yelling at you—be it a co-worker or a manager. But yelling back or arguing accomplishes little. It can destroy a business relationship and certainly dims your professional image. So before you respond to a verbal attack, keep these things in mind.

    • Figure out what’s really going on. In each of the following cases, compassion—not retaliation—is in order.
    • Every one is liable to blow up during a rough day at work. If the person yelling at you isn’t known as a chronic jerk, then consider that the source of the blow-up could stem other reasons and not personal.
    • Consider that some people are just socially inept and know no other way to communicate.
    • Then, there are some people who crave the attention and know that yelling or being aggressive is one way to get it.
    • Listen before you leap to conclusions. Assume first that what a person is saying is true. More often than not, we tend to start making a list of what’s wrong with a person and miss the opportunity to really find out what’s at issue. At that point, no one is listening to what the other is saying.
    • Stay neutral. Instead of adding fuel to the argument by yelling back, deflect the hostilities. Don’t walk away. Instead, demonstrate a neutral position. Answer in a calm, steady voice or give an inane answer. It usually stops an argument cold.
    • And don’t handle this via email. Take advantage of a Human Moment.

    Forgiving is not forgetting; it’s letting of go of anger and hurt and moving on. Take time. It’s not easy to forgive with both your head and heart.

    – Joan Burge

    The post Before You Retaliate appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 14:30:27 on 2018/04/25 Permalink
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    Happy Administrative Professionals’ Day! 

    A message from Joan Burge, Founder and CEO of Office Dynamics International:

     

    Happy Administrative Professionals’ Day!

    The team at Office Dynamics is grateful for each and every one of you. You have enriched our lives, challenged us to think big, and honor us by supporting our work. There is no greater joy for us than to serve you.

    It is my hope that you will always hold your head up high in this profession. For decades I have said being an administrative or executive assistant is a Career of Choice. There are millions of good assistants who love what they do and have committed themselves to this highly-valued work. Do you really know how special you are to your executives and organizations? I hope so and not only on this day but throughout the year.

    Well, what can I possibly tell you that you haven’t heard before or read somewhere else in relation to Administrative Professionals Day?
    Have a grand vision for yourself in this profession. That does not mean you have to climb the ladder and work for a CEO. Maybe that is not your desire. I mean expand and grow where you are planted. Expand your mind; add to your skill set; challenge your thinking; look at your day in a new way; be a life-long student. You will amaze yourself! Who you are today is not all of what you are capable of becoming. Trust me.

    To have a grand vision, you have to dream and ignore the naysayers. They don’t know you! You know you. But sometimes you don’t even know yourself. Often when assistants show up for our training, they are already skilled and experienced. During the course of the training day, they are stretched out of their comfort zones because of the learning activities we facilitate. These seasoned assistants are excited to see, at the end of the class, that they tapped into potential they didn’t even realize was within them.

    I congratulate you on how far you have come and where you are today.

    I encourage you to think bigger, to take takes risks, and become all you were created to be.

     

    joan_burge_signature
    Joan Burge
    Founder and CEO

    The post Happy Administrative Professionals’ Day! appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 17:00:05 on 2018/04/17 Permalink
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    Multigenerational Communication & Cross-mentorship 

     

    By Dana Buchanan

    The professional world of administrative and executive assistants and support staff is an exceptional melting pot of backgrounds, experience, knowledge, gender, age, education and personalities. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics in 2017 there were 22 million administrative support occupation positions recorded in the United States alone! Worldwide the number rises to make the profession one of the largest groups ever! This unique blend offers countless opportunities for multigenerational communication and cross-mentorship.

    Each generation and career level offer valuable knowledge. It’s an exciting and unique time in history that we work with such a diverse group of peers; varied age ranges, varied technologies and learning levels, traditional and experienced based education, etc. Cross-mentorship is a necessity. Whether I work with someone 20 years younger or older than me, I not only share and teach through my own work experience, but I also learn through their background and knowledge. This type of multigenerational communication and cross-mentorship not only keeps an experienced professional learning and excited about the profession, but also provides an opportunity to create a work legacy.

    When given the opportunity to meet with someone fairly new to the profession and someone embracing an upcoming retirement to explore even more in life, I enthusiastically embrace the moment and ask several questions of each! A willingness to learn and confidence to teach creates the roadmap to keeping our professional world evolving and relevant. We are all contributors to that mapping. The diverse team has combined organizational and time management skills, event and meeting planning, business savvy, continued professional development drive and so much more to ensure success and positive outcomes.

    A multigenerational team offers executives and managers more than just support assistance. The team shares varied views and appropriate input for decision making that helps promote the company’s mission. Cross-mentorship encourages each department and team member to work consistently while staying current on new programs, processes, tips and more.

    Professional and personal development are keys to keeping one of the largest workforce teams educated and invested in not only their own growth, but the growth and success of the company and field they have chosen to share their knowledge with.

    There are a variety of ways administrative professionals and the companies they work for can support multigenerational communication and cross-mentoring. Below are a few suggestions:

    • Communicate with a wider variety of professionals face to face at local chapter meetings or with virtual connections

     

    • Attendance to national or international conferences together or individually

     

    • Time to read and share professional blogs, articles, books, and webinars (most are free!)

     

    • Companies can invite or designate an in-house speaker to meet with the group quarterly & provide industry-specific professional development training

     

    • Encourage and seek program training from in-house IT employees as a team or individually

    Gaining knowledge and confidence by supporting, learning from, and teaching one another not only helps each of us develop personally and professionally, but also productively supports the executive teams.

    Knowledge is power. All of us have knowledge to share and new knowledge to learn. Seek answers, ask questions, share your skills…never stop learning.

    What is one piece of knowledge you would like to share with other professionals today?

    What is one question you would like to ask others in our chosen profession?

     

     

    joan_burge_dana_buchanan

    Dana (right) with Joan Burge at the 2017 Conference for Administrative Excellence

    Dana Buchanan is a 20 plus year professional assistant with a passion for writing and offers a unique and professional perspective to projects and brainstorming sessions! She enjoys helping others discover key steps toward their career focus, job search, or self-employment exploration by creating or editing resumes, researching a particular type of job search, discovering business ideas and the action needed to succeed and loves sharing interviewing tips! Dana is also available to speak to small groups.

    www.danabuchanan.com

    The post Multigenerational Communication & Cross-mentorship appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:30:11 on 2018/02/26 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , Work Environment   

    Fighting Office Dragons 

    Employee_ConflictI have been speaking about office dragons for years and how to professionally deal with the dragons. Dragons were huge, dominating, fictitious creatures. Medieval writers had vivid imaginations for big, scary things. For many people, work is like a dragon. It can be overwhelming and certainly dominates well over half of our waking hours. Sometimes the people we work with can be pretty “fiery” creatures to deal with, too.

    Please join me on Thursday, March 1, 2018 | 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. PT for my LIVE E-Course, Fighting Office Dragons. Reserve your spot now.

    There are many dragon species at work. Three of the most common perceived species are leaders, co-workers, and self. We are going to look at:

    1. The behaviors of each species that makes them appear to be like a dragon. Notice, I said the word appear.
    2. How to professionally deal with your dragons.

    Leaders can appear to be dragons when they:

    • do not communicate on the employee’s level
    • give poor direction
    • show favoritism
    • do not follow through on what they say
    • do not resolve conflicts

    Co-workers can appear to be dragons when they:

    • gossip
    • convey a bad mood at the office
    • do not perform their part of a job
    • are not a team player
    • do not share necessary information

    You can be a dragon to yourself when you:

    • do not focus on the job
    • let others damage your attitude
    • do not see your own potential
    • lack confidence
    • take criticism personally

    You can do more harm to yourself with negative thinking than any outside dragon. It is your thought process and attitude that controls your internal dragon. You have the power at any time to tame your dragon and put out the fire of any dragon-like qualities.

    Here are 5 strategies you can use with any of the dragons:

    1. Act … Don’t React. Reaction cycles never end. Only when you decide to think and act independently will you progress toward your goal. Reacting is responding to your immediate feeling. It puts you at the mercy of the dragon.
    2. Stop the Mind Reading! Face it, we all move so fast that we seldom take the initiative to clarify things with others. Instead, we ponder a scenario, rolling it over and over in our minds. We “determine” i.e., mind read, what that person was thinking/motivated by/perceiving, without simply asking them to clarify.
    3. Focus on Self-change vs. Changing Others. A good first step is communicating with the dragon. Informing someone and offering suggestions can sometimes be helpful because people don’t always see their negative attitude or behavior. In the final analysis, however, every adult does as he or she chooses. When you can’t change a situation or a person’s behavior, look at changing your view about this person. You can still control your attitude.
    4. Take Independent Steps Toward Your Goals. Determine what your goals are and write them down. List the one thing you can do toward achieving those goals each day. Doing this combines the winning strategies of independent action and self-change. Setting and achieving goals gives you a sense of accomplishment. This is a positive feeling. When you feel good about who you are and what you do, it naturally flows over to others.
    5. Make Friends. You spend more time with co-workers than you do with your family or friends. People at work must become allies instead of dragons. The work relationship requires respect, honesty, confidentiality, appreciation, communication, and energy.
    6. I personally have used all these strategies and know they work. I wish you the best in dragon fighting this week. The most important thing I want you to remember is that most of the time, the dragon is in our mind.

    Joan Burge

    Please join me on Thursday, March 1, 2018 | 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. PT for my LIVE E-Course, Fighting Office Dragons. Reserve your spot now.

    This post is part of Joan’s Monday Motivators, a weekly editorial designed to kick off your week with practical ways to create a new mindset, change behaviors, develop positive relationships and thrive in the workplace with energy, effectiveness, and excellence. Sign up HERE to follow Joan’s Monday Motivators.

    The post Fighting Office Dragons appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
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