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  • feedwordpress 09:00:54 on 2020/11/05 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , New Reality, , , , Trust, ,   

    How to Adapt Your Leadership To The New Reality 


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    The pandemic has shaken the nature of work and leadership to its core. And while many people are still anxiously awaiting a return to normal, it’s becoming more and more apparent that the “normal” we crave won’t be the same as what we had before.

    As we all come to terms with the fact that this crisis is changing the world in ways we never could have imagined, it’s more important than ever for leaders to be mindful of the need to adapt—not only to what’s happening in the moment but to a changing future. Here are some of the ways leaders should be adapting to the new reality:

    Leaders must adapt to create stability. People in uncertain times need stability so they can foster resiliency, and that stability is achieved when you create a purpose-driven culture that prepares them to meet every new challenge with confidence and a unifying sense of a shared mission.

    Leaders must adapt to create community. In the past, those who led remote teams focused on the challenges of communication and logistics. Now, with so many teams made up of people working from different locations, it’s important that you also create a sense of community. As dispersed teams move from being a stopgap measure to a new reality for many organizations, you need to seek out new ways to give direction, provide autonomy, and focus on outcomes while also building a strong, close-knit team.

    Leaders must adapt to cultivate transparency and communication. More than ever, leaders need to establish platforms and forums where information is available and accessible. You want people to find information they need and for information to be exchanged through channels that are clear and convenient. Transparency and communication are especially critical in times of change.

    Leaders must adapt to show flexibility. The relentless pace of change means people need to see leaders who model agility. To be successful, you need to prepare now to function in a business environment that requires high-level dynamic planning and thinking every day.

    Leaders must adapt to focus on reliability. Especially in times of uncertainty, people need leaders they can count on. Make especially sure that your word is iron-clad. If you aren’t sure or you don’t know, say so—and if you learn later that you were wrong about something, own it.

    Leaders must adapt to preserve the mental health of their people. To ensure and sustain the physical and mental health of your employees, you need to understand what they’re going through, and that comes from putting in the time to listen and being empathetic and compassionate. If you don’t listen you won’t know, and leaders need to be in the know about their employees’ well-being.

    At the bottom line, we need leaders who can adapt to meet any challenges for the new reality, and the ones who succeed will be the ones who are mindful and thoughtful.

    Lead from within: The leaders who can filter out the distractions and focus on what truly drives success will emerge stronger than ever—and so will their organizations.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Adapt Your Leadership To The New Reality appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:20 on 2020/09/10 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Diversity, , Inclusion, Inclusive, , , , , , Trust, ,   

    How to Do Inclusive Leadership—the Right Way 


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    In recent months we’ve heard courageous voices demanding social and economic equality, and leaders within many organizations have been responding to that call by examining their own attitudes and practices.

    Most of them have good intentions, but there’s a big divide between intentions and outcomes. In practice, inclusion often goes amiss, strategies for change go flat, and the potential for excellence is lost.

    I’ve made a point in recent months of having each of my clients—from small-business owners to executives of major corporations—take a fresh look at their organization’s diversity and inclusion initiatives. Most of them came away from the process with a desire to genuinely do better instead of spinning their wheels with measures that didn’t create lasting change. Here’s an outline of the coaching I’ve been providing these clients on how to start doing things differently:

    Increase your self-awareness. Inclusiveness starts with the leader at the helm. Begin by honestly asking yourself how well you genuinely embrace and engage in inclusion. Many leaders understand the importance of inclusion and diversity in theory and are happy to advocate for it with their words, but they’re far less comfortable taking the kind of action that creates change. Commit to taking that action and make it a priority. When you do, your commitment will reverberate throughout your organization.

    Expose your blind spots. Implicit bias is built in to the human brain. That means that even the best of us—individuals and organizations—have blind spots that keep us from seeing things objectively. It takes an outsider to identify and start eliminating those blind spots, so find a consultant or coach you trust and give them a broad mandate to help you achieve change.

    Deepen your relationships. After you’ve developed a higher level of self-awareness, you’re ready to begin working on social awareness—the way your beliefs and implicit biases affect your relationships with others. If you want your company to become more inclusive, start working on your own ability to create authentic relationships with your colleagues and employees. Changing an organization’s culture begins with simple acts of connection.

    Invest in change. It’s one thing to say you want change, but to make it happen you need to add money, time and effort to your words. Invest in resources and people. Spend time and energy working to confront challenges and create opportunities. Identify and study your gaps and find ways to bridge them. Do what it takes to make sure every employee feels valued and knows they matter and belong.

    Embody courage. Being an inclusive leader isn’t easy. Some will criticize you for your commitment, and others will criticize you for not getting the results you want right away. But I believe that every leader should pursue this path with as much determination as possible. Change requires courage, and the best way of making it happen sooner rather than later is by forging ahead.

    Lead from within:  All change has to start somewhere and genuine, meaningful inclusiveness has to begin within you as a leader.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Do Inclusive Leadership—the Right Way appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:19 on 2020/09/01 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , Trust,   

    How to Build Trust In A Room When You Need It Most 


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    To be an effective leader you need to be able to build trust. It’s really that simple. If trust isn’t present, you can’t lead successfully. Building trust is an ongoing process, something you need to work at every day. Here are some of the key elements:

    Learn to communicate effectively. Poor communication is a major reason for mistrust. Good communication includes being clear about what you have or have not committed to and what has been agreed upon. Building trust requires connection, so it’s important that the messages you send are exactly what you intend them to be and that you listen well enough to interpret other people’s messages correctly.

    Demonstrate expertise and good judgment. People are more likely to trust you as a leader if they believe you know what you’re talking about and have the experience and discernment to make good decisions. You can’t build trust when you’re faking it. Do your homework and make sure you can showcase your expertise with clarity and confidence.

    Value your relationships and don’t take them for granted. Strong leadership is based on developing and maintaining relationships. That means you need to be active in keeping relationships strong, never taking them for granted. When you support people, resolve conflicts fairly and give honest feedback, you show the consistency that builds trusting relationships.

    Follow through on commitments and do what you say you’ll do. In a recent study, a significant percentage of employees said that the most effective way to build trust was simply following through on commitments. In contrast, 48 percent said their leaders were all talk and no action. Building trust means voicing commitments and then doing what you said you would do.

    Be unfailingly honest and transparent. Many leaders, even those who pride themselves on communication and motivation, have a hard time telling the truth when the news is bad. While it’s a natural impulse to protect people from bad news, a lack of transparency and honesty creates a culture of suspicion and rumors.

    Admit your mistakes and take ownership of your failures. You’ve probably seen what happens when someone—especially a leader—tries to hide their mistakes. Most often the person ends up looking even worse than they would have if they’d just owned up from the start. There’s a common fear that showing your vulnerable side and letting people see your imperfections will damage your credibility as a leader. In fact, it builds trust and relatability.

    Trust is required in the workplace so everyone can feel they are there for the right reasons, working toward shared goals with a sense of purpose. Every effective leader knows that if trust isn’t in the room, they have to learn to build it and earn it.

    Lead from within: Leading a company to greatness isn’t done in a day, and no one said it would be easy. But when you build strong foundations of trust, people can work to build greatness together.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Build Trust In A Room When You Need It Most appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:13 on 2020/07/09 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , Trust,   

    How to Know You’re About To Make A Bad Leadership Decision 


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    Do you know a successful leader who’s made bad decisions? The answer is almost certainly “yes.”

    Decision making is a big part of leadership, and strong leaders pride themselves on their judgment and decisiveness. But even the best of them have made bad decisions at some point—and some of those mistakes were preventable.

    Here are the top red flags that can warn you that you may be making a bad choice. Watch for them in your day-to-day decision making and if you see cause for concern, take some time to reconsider. No decision is without risk, but if you’re thoughtful and deliberate in your decision making, you’ll be right more often than not.

    If you don’t ask for other opinions. Many leaders make the mistake of thinking they have to make decisions on their own. But especially when you’re faced with an important decision, it’s smart to seek out the counsel of others. Talking through the issues with someone you trust can bring clarity and new insights.

    If you decide too quickly. We live in an age where everything seems to require an instant response. The need to make decisions on the fly can lead to mistakes even for the best leaders. Some situations require swift action, but whenever possible give yourself time to process and think.

    If you don’t have all the information you need. The devil is in the details, as the old saying goes, and it’s hard to make a sound decision when you don’t have access to information you need. Carry out your due diligence and do your research. You can’t remove uncertainty from decision making, but you can minimize it by making informed choices.

    If you only want to follow your gut. Many leaders pride themselves on following their gut instinct. For the best, those instincts are grounded in years of education and experience. For most of us, though, our instincts need backup. If all the evidence and facts point in one direction, and your gut disagrees, ask yourself if something else is at work—maybe denial, wishful thinking, or bias. In most situations where you’re facing a significant decision, trust your head more than your gut.

    If you’re too emotional. As a leader, your decisions may be bold, but they also need to be rational. Decisions based on emotion and carried out in the fervent heat of the moment may feel good in the short run, but they aren’t likely to bring good results. Especially if it’s an important decision, take a break and slow things down. Buy yourself some time to quiet your emotions and think things through.

    Making good decisions is not always easy, but heeding the warning signs can help keep you from making bad ones.

    Lead from within: We all make choices, and in the end our choices make us who we are as leaders.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Know You’re About To Make A Bad Leadership Decision appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:43 on 2020/06/25 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , Trust,   

    What is the Worst Leadership Styles and Why 


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    People who study leadership theory learn about numerous styles of leadership: autocratic, democratic, strategic, transformational—on and on. It can be interesting to debate the pros and cons of each.

    But whatever theory you subscribe to—or if you’re a self-taught leader who doesn’t believe in theories—there are some styles of leadership that are always detrimental. Here are a few of the worst:

    Know-it-all leadership. People don’t admire leaders who pretend to know everything and insist that whatever they do is right. Leaders who think they’re smarter than everyone else create isolation and quickly come to be resented by their peers and the people on their team.

    Absent leadership. Some leaders are physically absent—always away at a meeting or conference, wandering somewhere else in the building or working from home. Many more are physically present and may even pride themselves on being accessible because their office door is always open. But if they’re distracted and checked out, never really listening or pitching in, they might as well be somewhere else.

    Inflexible leadership. A leader’s behavior is the single biggest factor they bring to bear on influencing others. Agile, creative leadership has the power to energize, engage and motivate people to go the extra mile for their organization. But a leader who’s inflexible and stubborn creates demotivation, poor performance, frequent absences, and high turnover.

    Micromanaging leadership. Micromanagement has a devastating effect on even the best teams, destroying morale and productivity. Part of the problem is that most micromanagers aren’t even aware of what they’re doing. They’re often the ones saying “I don’t believe in micromanagement, but…”. Effective leadership means a commitment to focus on the big picture and on motivating employees, not standing over their shoulder.

    Self-serving leadership. Ego can undermine leadership in two ways. The first is false pride, when you focus on self-promotion and making yourself look good even at the expense of your team or peers. The second is self-doubt or fear, when you lose confidence and question yourself and your abilities. They move in different directions, but they’re equally destructive.

    Leadership by intimidation. Those who lead from fear are often terrified of looking weak, but in trying to look strong they fail themselves and their team. Instead of sharing a vision that motivates, they threaten and complain. Instead of analyzing problems and looking for solutions, they focus on placing blame. Talented team members find new options, leaving only mediocre performers who are lacking enough in confidence to allow themselves to be bullied on a daily basis.

    At the end of the day, every leader has their own preferred style. The important thing is to be aware of what style you’re putting out there and to check in periodically to make sure it’s serving your team and yourself well.

    Lead from within: It’s said that the best sign of a good leader is not how many followers they have, but how many leaders they create. If your leadership style is right, your influence will quickly spread.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post What is the Worst Leadership Styles and Why appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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