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  • feedwordpress 09:00:46 on 2021/03/02 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Trust, ,   

    How the Best Leaders Build Trust at Work 


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    Trust is a crucial element for any successful team. When team members are working remotely it becomes even more important—but also more difficult to achieve and maintain. Whatever your team’s situation, the best way for you to foster a climate of trust is to lead by example. If you want your people to trust one another, you need to first demonstrate that you trust them yourself. Here’s what that can look like:

    Trust your people to be capable. Give them room to stretch their boundaries without being micromanaged. When you trust your team members with responsibility, you send them a clear message: that the real challenge is not facing what stands before them but learning to believe in what is within them. And if someone’s not giving their best, ask yourself if you’ve truly given them the opportunity to shine. To build a successful team and organization means developing and harnessing the capabilities of each person, and that process starts with trust.

    Trust your people to be credible. An elemental component of trust is credibility—knowing that you can trust what someone says and take them at their word. To build trust in your team, make it a personal police to believe what they tell you unless you have strong evidence to the contrary—and even then, ask questions instead of jumping to conclusions. Don’t rely on your own assumptions.

    Trust your people to be reliable. Show your team not only that you depend on them but also that you trust them to meet expectations and accomplish what needs to be done. Remember, the best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them. And make sure that you’re showing your team the same level of reliability that you expect of them.

    Trust your people to be responsible. Build trust and help your people grow by giving them the authority to deal with the issues that come their way using their best judgment. Let them do what they need to do and say what they need to say without interfering or interrupting. Don’t require that they obtain permission before they make a decision—instead, promote and model genuine accountability.

    Above all, trust yourself. Building trust with others requires a strong sense of self-awareness. Leaders who don’t trust themselves have a hard time trusting others. If you need to work through some personal development in this area, consult a mentor or leadership coach if that option is available to you. Build your own self-trust and self-reliance so you can pass those traits along to others.

    Trust is the glue of leadership. It is the most essential ingredient in bonding relationships and building connections between leaders and their teams, among team members, and within organizations as a whole.

    Lead from within: Trust is the essential foundation of leadership and business; without it, there’s not much to build on.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How the Best Leaders Build Trust at Work appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:57 on 2021/02/02 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , Trust, ,   

    How to Build a Relationship with a Leader You Admire 


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    One of the most important ways you can grow in your leadership is by building a relationship with a leader you admire. An experienced leader can provide you with insightful feedback, intelligent advice and a different perspective. The value of such a relationship can be priceless—but how do you get started? Here are some steps you can take:.

    Be willing to take the first step. It’s easy to think about how good something could be, but the only way to turn a dream into achievement is to make a plan and take action. Start by drawing up a list of leaders you admire who might be good candidates for a relationship.

    Test your own assumptions. If you have someone in mind, don’t assume that they’re too important or too busy or too distracted to be interested. Most top leaders are committed to using what they’ve learned to help others, and you never know what’s possible until you try.

    Make your request: Once you’ve decided which leader you want to approach, find a way to reach out to them—in person if possible, or by email or phone or letter. You don’t have to treat it as a formal request, but be clear about what you’re asking—especially if you don’t know the person well.

    Speak from the heart. I’m a big believer in the principle that it’s not so much what you say but how you say it that matters most. If you speak from the heart, it’s likely to be appreciated. Let them know why you admire and respect them.

    Combine vulnerability and confidence. Make sure your request and early communications don’t sound either too needy or overly confident. Let the person know that you’re eager to learn and want to improve.

    Be gracious. If the person says yes, thank them warmly and follow up with a handwritten thank-you note. Schedule your first meeting promptly to get the momentum going. Keep your tone both enthusiastic and professional.

    Treat rejection as a lesson too. If you get rejected don’t take it personally. If you have a chance, ask why they chose not to accept. The answer may help you improve your next attempt, or it may be just a question of overcommitment or bad timing. Whatever the response, know that you were courageous enough to ask. Be proud of yourself and find someone else to ask.

    Make it a two-way relationship. As you work with the other person, keep your desire to learn and grow at the forefront to make good use of your time together. At the same time, look for ways you can benefit them—there may be times when your own perspective or background will be helpful.

    Lead from within: Learning how to build a relationship with someone you admire is a skill that is both worthy and meaningful. This type of connection is a valuable investment, so treat it with care.


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Build a Relationship with a Leader You Admire appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:53 on 2021/02/02 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , Trust, ,   

    What Happens When a Leader Stops Communicating 


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    He was a great businessman, but stubborn. As his coach, I was recommending that he be more transparent within his organization, but he kept insisting that his people didn’t need communication—they just needed to do their work. After some back and forth, he said in exasperation, “Maybe I’ll just stop communicating altogether!”

    I told him it was the worst idea he’d ever had.

    A lack of communication from leadership has the potential to harm teams, businesses, workplace dynamics, and the processes that keep everything moving. An uncommunicative leader often causes serious organizational problems. Some of the most common:

    A dysfunctional culture. Ineffective communication leads to employee frustration, which in turn breeds distrust and confusion. As those problems spread, loyalty and commitment to the organization decline. Unhappy employees are the top symptom of a dysfunctional culture.

    A lack of respect. Respect grows out of relationships, and relationships are built on communication. Communication allows for opportunities to share ideas and perspectives; it builds mutual understanding and trust—all elements of the respect that effective workplaces require. Without communication, there is nowhere for respect to take root. And without an atmosphere of respect, it’s difficult for any organization to function effectively.

    Decreased performance. Employees need to know what’s required of them, what success looks like, what issues may be causing trouble, and how they’re doing. Without reliable access to information and resources, they can’t effectively perform their jobs. The resulting frustration leads to a decrease in morale and motivation, causing productivity to drop even further. And every drop in performance carries a cost in reputation and success.

    I stated all these points to my client. As I said, he’s a stubborn man—but he’s smart about business, and the last thing he wanted was for his organization to lose its reputation and success. He began to understand how necessary communication was to reaching his goals for the company, and he saw that providing employees with effective communication could boost performance and help his business run more efficiently.

    Leaders sometimes think the more they withhold the more power they hold. But I believe the opposite is true—the more you communicate, the more power it gives you.

    Poor communication between you and your employees, on the other hand, can have serious long-term consequences for your organization. It can also keep you from reaching your full potential as a leader, alienate those around you, and have a negative impact on the performance and results your leadership is judged by.

    If you want to lead, it’s vital that you cultivate your communication skills and spend significant daily time and effort on communication with your team.

    Lead from within: Making communication a focal point of your leadership can lead to successes within your business and boost productivity and profits.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post What Happens When a Leader Stops Communicating appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:49 on 2020/12/08 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Intimidation, , , , , , , , , Trust, ,   

    How to Deal with An Intimidating Leader 


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    Many organizations operate out of the belief that people in leadership need a tough mindset to be effective. Especially in turbulent times, there’s a sense that the only way leaders can reach the financial and subjective goals they’re measured against is to bulldoze their people. But of course this approach doesn’t yield great results, and it leaves employees feeling unnerved, insecure and even frightened.

    If you’re among those who are feeling intimidated and overwhelmed, here are some tips for coping:

    Manifest the right mindset. The best way to deal with an intimidating leader is to keep a good mindset. Don’t take anything they say to heart; remember that what they’re saying and doing is a reflection on them, not you. When you keep that in mind, it becomes a lot easier to manage your attitude and your emotions.

    Practice direct and concise communication. Never give anyone who’s trying to intimidate you reason to believe their efforts are working. When you need to communicate with your intimidating leader, plan and rehearse to make sure you’re clear, direct, confident and firm about what you’re saying.  Some examples

    • I think…..
    • I appreciate the feedback, but I don’t agree.
    • Let me get back to you on that.
    • Here’s what I can do …
    • I understand your position; here’s mine.

    Maintain your professionalism. When your leader is intimidating, it’s more important than ever to avoid negative behavior like gossip, yelling, or losing your temper. Don’t badmouth your leader to others. Whatever happens, remember that you can’t control their behavior but you can control your response and keep your own behavior impeccably professional. That doesn’t mean you have to put up with bullying—report abusive behavior to Human Resources or through your organization’s official channels.

    Develop a stronger relationship. If you can get past the intimidating façade to the human beneath, it may be possible to begin developing a stronger relationship with your intimidating leader. If they know they can trust you, they may be inclined to let go of their hard exterior—at least with you, and maybe eventually with others as well.

    Lead by example: Be a model for a better way of leadership. Show your leader that appreciation, recognition and reassurance lead to better results than intimidation, and they may start paying attention. Demonstrate to your leader, and to others on your team, what open and authentic leadership looks like.

    Leadership through intimidation often gives rise to mistrust and skepticism, and the consequences to people, teams and organizations can be deep and long-lasting. If you’re in leadership yourself, take stock of yourself to make sure you’re not guilty of intimidation. And if you’re working for someone who exhibits patterns of intimidating behavior, do everything you can to deal with it and turn it around—and keep yourself healthy and grounded in spite of their efforts.

    Lead from within: Leadership at its best is based upon inspiration and motivation, not domination or intimidation.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Deal with An Intimidating Leader appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:23 on 2020/12/01 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , Toxic Leadership, Trust, ,   

    Your Leadership is Toxic When You Do This 


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    You’ve probably heard the old adage that people don’t leave bad jobs—they leave bad bosses. Your style of leadership is important to every element of your team’s success. It’s up to you to create a culture of positivity and support, or one of intimidation and mistrust.

    Toxic leadership happens at every level in every type of organization, leaving employees, teams and organizations demoralized and ineffective. It’s rarely intentional, and many leaders who practice toxic behaviors aren’t even aware of what they’re doing. Here are some of the top signs:

    When you lead with arrogance. If your leadership is based on a sense of self-importance, it is likely causing negativity. Leadership is about advancing others, not promoting yourself.

     When you lead with micromanagement. If you can’t trust your team, if you keep putting your fingerprints on everybody’s work, if you have a hard time letting go of the details, you’re likely engaged in micromanagement. And that means your team is almost certainly feeling undermined and uninspired—which, in turn, means they’re less effective and productive than they could be.

    When you lead with unrealistic expectations. Demanding leaders are constantly asking for things that are unrealistic or even impossible. Getting people to stretch is good, but setting goals so high that they’re virtually impossible to reach results in a  disengaged team.

    When you lead with deficiencies. You may have the title, but that doesn’t mean you have all the answers—or even that you should. The best kind of leadership is being genuine enough to say, “I don’t know it all, but I surround myself with people who do.” Leadership means amplifying the strengths of others instead of insisting on the sound of your own voice.

    When you lead with a temper. Emotionally unstable leadership is by nature toxic; a leader with anger problems creates an organizational culture that feels unsafe and uncomfortable. If you can’t manage your own emotions, it’s hard to persuade others to have faith in you. Your team can’t perform well if they’re walking on eggshells.

    When you lead with insolence. If you’re rude to those who disagree with you or dismissive of those who express opinions that differ from your own, if you have a reputation for being intolerant of dissent, you’re likely to be inspiring contempt rather than excellence. Honest exchanges of ideas and opinion are an essential part of any functioning team, and without them your leadership can’t prosper.

    Few leaders are entirely toxic, but too many have at least a streak of toxic behavior—and whatever the degree, it’s damaging to everyone involved. If you recognize even one of these signs in your own leadership, you need to make a change. Seek out a coach or mentor, or work with yourself and make a disciplined effort to become the kind of leader you can be proud of.

    Lead from within:  Awareness is key in leadership, and it’s the key to avoiding the kinds of toxic leadership that create a negative experience for yourself and those you lead.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Your Leadership is Toxic When You Do This appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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