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  • feedwordpress 09:00:14 on 2019/12/05 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Mistrust, , , Trust,   

    Never, Ever Trust A Leader Who Does These Things 


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    Being in a position to lead others comes with an enormous amount of responsibility. People look up to you as an example of how to speak and behave. If you don’t slow down long enough to think about your words and actions, it will cost you the respect and trust of those you are trying to lead. Here are some specific things as a leader, you should never ever do.

    Don’t power-trip. Even if you hold a great deal of power over those you lead, never throw it in their face. If you want to be a leader who is admired, lead with purpose instead of power. Those who base their leadership in power communicate their own insecurity and quickly lose the respect of their team.

    Don’t steal credit. Leaders and bosses who take personal credit for the work of their team are not just frustrating but actually toxic. People quickly learn to either stay clear or work to undermine their leader’s self-serving efforts.

    Don’t play favorites. If you’ve ever experienced favoritism, you know how damaging it can be. Few things are more demoralizing than a boss who picks favorites. As a leader, you need to treat everyone the same and encourage everyone equally. Otherwise, it becomes a game that no one wants to play.

    Don’t suck up people’s time. There are bosses who email, call and text at all hours of the day and night, who have a habit of interrupting evenings and weekends with things that have to be done right now. If that sounds like you, know that the primary message you’re sending is that you don’t respect other people’s time.

    Don’t be a control freak. you can recognize a control freak leader by their need to attend to every detail of everything and everyone. Nothing is ever good enough, because in the leader’s mind they would have done it better themselves. In short: that’s rubbish. Control freak leaders are too weak to even entrust others to do the job they were hired to do.

    Don’t lie. Leaders need to tell the truth, even when the truth is the last thing people want to hear. Lies have a way of catching up with the person who tells them, so always speak the truth. Once you’ve been caught in a lie you have lost all trust.

    Don’t intimidate people. Arguably the worst kind of leader is one who tries to reinforce their position by making others feel less capable. The essence of leadership is making people feel they can do the impossible. The best leaders establish their leadership by building others up, not by intimidating others in order to feel good about themselves.

    If people cannot trust their leader to do their job—to inspire them to a common purpose and support them in achieving it—achievement and excellence become difficult, if not impossible.

    Lead from within: It is the trusted leader who sets the bar high and then works hard to reach it every day.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    The post Never, Ever Trust A Leader Who Does These Things appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:44 on 2019/11/26 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , Trust,   

    How to Make Every Day Employee Appreciation Day 


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    Many of the organizations where I coach hold an annual employee appreciation day. The leadership team presents employees who have had significant accomplishments or anniversaries with some form of recognition. Then they say something about how important every member of the team is and go back to their offices, satisfied that they’ve taken care of employee appreciation for another year.

    To be honest, it’s a horrible idea. Showing appreciation is good, but showing it only once a year is a problem. I believe employee appreciation should happen every day.

    When was the last time you told your hard-working team that they’re doing a good job and that you appreciate them? If you have to think about it too much, you’re not appreciating them enough.

    If you want your best employees to stay, your cost of staff turnover to be low, and your leadership to thrive, you need to show appreciation—not with a few trite phrases of gratitude at an annual event, but with daily expressions of how much you value them. To help you get started, here are 25 ways to show your appreciation and gratitude:

    Make a drive-by connection. One of the best ways to let people know you value them is to make a spontaneous stop by their office or desk and just ask, “How are you?”

    Treat feedback as a gift. Feedback is important. To be effective, though, it should never be treated as criticism but as a gift, where the person understands you are telling them something because you care about them.

    Give an ambassadorship. Invite an employee to represent your department or organization at an event they typically wouldn’t have a chance to attend.

    Encourage special projects. Give people an opportunity to work on special projects beyond their regular responsibilities and help them achieve success.

    Have a “cheers from peers” time. Give people a chance to call out positive things about others who are doing great work, building camaraderie and bringing outstanding performance to your attention—and everyone else’s.

    Extend an invitation. Invite your top performer to join your executive team meeting to meet senior leadership and open a new perspective.

    Establish mentorship. Arranging mentors for interested employees shows your investment in their success.

    Ask for ideas and opinions. Appreciation isn’t just a reward system. It should be built into the organizational culture. One way to do that is to give your employees real choices and actual voices.

    Write a note. Send handwritten notes—not an email— telling people that you appreciate them and thanking them for their work.

    Broadcast your thanks. Send a companywide email praising your employees for a job well done.

    Be specific. Don’t just say “thank you for all you do”—let people know exactly what you appreciate about them. Be as specific and detailed as possible.

    Host a lunch and learn. Give people a chance to spend time together informally and learn about something of interest that isn’t necessarily related to work.

    Encourage continuing education. Send people to classes and seminars, help with tuition (or pay it completely)—when you help people keep learning you help them advance their careers.

    Invest in their health. Make it clear that you want your employees to take care of themselves, in and out of the workplace. Consider gym memberships, step challenges, healthy snacks.

    Let them have a say. Create an employee survey to learn how people would most like to be recognized and appreciated.

    Renovate your break room. Make it a welcoming place to truly get away from work and refresh.

    Personalize recognition. Find out what people like, learn their interests and hobbies, and provide recognition in a way that benefits them personally.

    Remember their birthday. Give employees a day off they can use on their birthday or whenever they want.

    Recognize work anniversaries. Reward people who stay with the company and provide public recognition.

    Hand out gift cards. One of my clients hands out gift cards, and their employees truly appreciate it.

    Write it up. Feature your employees’ success stories in your company newsletter or blog.

    Send a video. Create an appreciation video for your employee with a thank-you message from your CEO.

    Give a social media shout-out. Post photos of your employees on social media and brag about their achievements. Don’t forget to tag them!

    Bring on the food trucks. it’s a fun perk that breaks up the usual brown-bag lunch.

    Give tickets for an exclusive event. Reward your employees with hard-to-obtain tickets.

    Some leaders take for granted that employees are there to do the work tasked to them, and think that because it is expected, there is no need for a thank you that is far from true.

    If you want to keep your employees happy, engaged and productive, you need to let them know that their hard work is recognized and appreciated—not just once a year, but every day.

    Lead from within: Employee recognition is the foundation of employee satisfaction and leadership gratification.


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Make Every Day Employee Appreciation Day appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:12 on 2019/11/07 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , Trust,   

    How to Recognize a Trustworthy Leader 


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    At its best, leadership inspires people to pull together collectively to achieve something great. That kind of inspiration requires a trustworthy leader—one who treats leadership not as a source of personal power but as a channel for serving others. How do you know when a leader is trustworthy? Here are some signs to look for:

    They stand on principle even when they have to stand alone. It takes great character to stand up for what you believe in, especially when everyone else is standing against you. A trustworthy leader will always act in the interest of the greater good, even if that means going against the prevailing trend.

    They help others become better and improve their lives. A trustworthy leader will always invest in relationships with others. They’re unfailingly supportive and willing to go the extra mile to help those around them grow and improve. At the heart of a trusted leader is a core of service and support.

    They listen with an open heart and mind. Listening may not appear anywhere in a leader’s job description, but it is a critical responsibility. A leader who listens is in a much better position to lead their organization to greater levels of success. Listening, asking questions and listening to what people have to say all signal a leader who cares—and one who can be trusted.

    They don’t sweep difficult issues under the rug. Many people think of leadership as the business of steering clear of adversity and challenging situations. But trustworthy leaders have a different perspective. They know that difficult situations will arise, and they see their work not as sidestepping them or sweeping them under the rug, but facing it with their people and going through it together.

    They stay steady under pressure. The pressure on leaders is both real and constant, and at times it can become extreme. Trustworthy leaders are those who can stay calm and steady in every situation, however tense or hurried. Anyone can hold the helm when the sea is calm; it’s during the storms that true character is revealed.

    They take responsibility, and you can count on them. One of the highest marks for a trusted leader is a reputation as someone people know they can count on. That means maintaining the willingness to take charge when everything is falling apart and to take the blame when things go wrong. The trait of accountability is a key element of trustworthiness.

    They say what they mean and mean what they say. We’ve all been around people who say one thing but do another, or who try to deny their own words or actions—and it’s infuriating. A leader who says what they mean and means what they say can always be trusted.

    Lead from within: A trustworthy leader isn’t easy to find—but when you do, they’re unforgettable.

     


     

    #1 N A T I O N A L B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

     

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Recognize a Trustworthy Leader appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:39 on 2019/10/15 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Trust, , Workplaces   

    7 Quick Ways to Make Your Employees Happy at Work 


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    We all want our employees to be happy at work. But there are days when nothing seems to be going well and everything seems to be going wrong. Every leader has to guide their teams through off days and bad weeks, and sometimes through more serious long-term difficulties.

    What we do in those circumstances as a leader matters greatly. Here are some of the most effective steps you can take:

    Lend a listening ear. A lot of people do a lot of talking, but not nearly as many are listening. Listen to people when they speak, and don’t automatically respond. Allow people to express themselves—give them the time and attention they need to vent, speak and express what is on their mind. The best way to motivate people is to let them know you hear them.

    Give compliments. The quickest way to make your employees happy at work is by giving them a sincere compliment about a recent accomplishment. A lot of us tend to take things for granted. Be generous with compliments— be sure you let people know how much their time and effort mean to you.

    Invest in people. There are all kinds of ways to invest in your employees. You can offer them time off to study, take a course or learn a new skill; you can hire them a coach; you can send them to a conference or retreat. Investing in your employees pays off twice, because they learn something new (which they can often pass along to others on the team) and because it shows you believe in them.

    Express gratitude. The employees who thrive at work are the ones who know their contributions have meaning and are making a difference. When a leader expresses gratitude for the ways their work matters, employees stay engaged and excited. Always, always thank your employees. What may feel like a small word or gesture of gratitude to you may be much more significant to the one who receives it.

    Offer encouragement. There will always be tasks to complete and actions to take and stress to be had. The best thing you can do as a leader is to let people know you believe in them. A word of encouragement during a failure means more than an hour of praise after a success.

    Celebrate wins. The best leaders understand the importance of celebrating wins—large and small. The more you praise and celebrate the wins, the more there wins there are to celebrate.

    Provide support. More than half of people who leave their jobs do so because of their relationship with their boss. Smart leaders make sure to provide support, guidance, and coaching and to challenge people. They understand that to truly support someone means not just reaching out a hand but extending an arm. When you help others achieve their goals, you’re achieving as well.

    There’s no end to the things you can do to help keep your employees happy at work. The better you get to know your team, the better you can find the things that work for them. But with any team and circumstance, these suggestions are a good place to start.

    Lead from within: Focus your attention on your people and watch your employees be happier and more productive, engaged and enthusiastic about themselves and the work they do.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.
    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 7 Quick Ways to Make Your Employees Happy at Work appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:26 on 2019/08/29 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Trust,   

    People Trust Leaders Who Have These 5 Powerful Habits 


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    Trust doesn’t come naturally—it has to be earned. And if you’re in a leadership position, earning the trust of those around you is one of the most important keys to your success.

    Some people may seem naturally trustworthy. But it’s not as much a matter of nature as of action. The best way to build trust is by practicing a set of daily habits that help convey your trustworthiness. Here are some of the ways top leaders work every day to earn and keep trust:

    They are radically honest. When leaders are honest with people, people reciprocate—not only with their own honesty but also with trust. There’s a reason that “honesty is the best policy” is among the most prevalent of old sayings. Especially if you can be honest in bad times as well as good, people will naturally trust you.

    They’re invested in helping people grow and become better. When great leaders are invested in helping people learn, grow and become better human beings, people will not only be drawn to them but will also trust them. A leader who is thinking of others is a leader people have faith in.

    They consistently offer support. When leaders show they care by supporting their people with whatever they need, and mentoring and coaching them with they need assistance, people feel confident in their own position and assured in their leader.

    They seek input from others. When leaders don’t think they know it all, and are willing to seek ideas and feedback—even if it’s critical—it demonstrates that that they’re leading with character. And people tend to trust anyone who leads with character.

    They’re willing to admit when they’re wrong. The best leaders admit when they are wrong, earning the respect of everyone they lead and establishing their leadership as trustworthy.

    When people trust you, their confidence in your leadership will come naturally and genuinely. Working every day to build and maintain trust with everyone around you is some of the best time you can spend.

    Lead from within: Trust affects a leader’s influence and the company’s bottom line more than any other leadership trait. Get it right and you know you’ve got your leadership right.


    #1  N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: istockphotos

    The post People Trust Leaders Who Have These 5 Powerful Habits appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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