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  • feedwordpress 09:00:41 on 2017/08/01 Permalink
    Tags: , , , The Leadership Gap   

    Here’s Why You Can’t Afford to Just Stand By And Watch 

    We are living in difficult times, with dysfunction and great disruption seemingly at every turn.

    But there’s something to be learned in any situation. And our times now are asking us some important questions:

    Why we don’t have better leadership?

     Why is it we have leaders that disappoint and dissatisfy us?

    Why do we allow this to happen?

    An important part of the answer to these questions is this: We have become a society of bystanders.

    Bystanders don’t get involved. They stand by—exactly as the name says—and watch without helping.

    Bystanders see something but do nothing; they hear something but say nothing.

    Bystanders are created by fear.

    If you are acting out of fear you cannot be brave, and if you are acting out of passivity you cannot be courageous.

    It’s when we feel most powerless, when we feel nothing we can do will change the status quo, that we need to challenge our fear and passivity—to stop being afraid, to leave any passive inclinations behind.

    If you think you’re not playing a part in the dysfunction, think again. Anyone who is a bystander—anyone who’s watching without doing anything about the troublesome things they see—is part of the problem.

    Ask yourself if any of these traits describe you:

    You believe you’re not leadership material. Where are all the men and women who have strong vision and great ideas and are compelled for the greater good? Maybe you’ve let yourself believe you lack the power or the conviction or the skills to lead. If so, you need to start where you are and answer the call. You’ve never been needed more.

    You’re suppressing your awareness. It’s easy to become so distressed that all you want to do is disengage. If you’re dismissing the problem by checking out because it’s too much to deal with, you’re resigning yourself to apathy. It’s never made any problem go away—if anything it makes things worse. You can’t help yourself or others by ignoring reality. More than ever before we need leaders who can look squarely at the problems we face.

    You’ve stopped meeting the challenges. Suppose our companies, our organizations, our teams, our leaders, became stopped trying to meet our needs. The effects would be terrible. When we’re all facing more and more challenges, it’s tempting to take a break from doing the hard work of turning them around. Remember that you’re pacing yourself for a marathon, not a sprint, so you can maintain a steady effort every day.

    You’re scared to stand up for your convictions. To lead others requires integrity, a word whose Latin origins mean wholeness and completeness, and which in turn means consistency of character. You can’t lose your convictions or your courage when you’re fighting for a common purpose, and you can’t deny the truth you see in exchange for security or someone else’s agenda. Strong convictions precede great actions.

    It’s our duty not only to meet these standards ourselves but to hold others in leadership to them. When a leader becomes lazy, self-indulgent, deceiving, or corrupt, we have to take action and challenge their power.

    Here’s why you can’t afford to just stand by and watch because true leadership is about people: people before policy, people before profits, and people before procedures.

    If we allow those we don’t respect to lead and those we don’t trust to have influence, we are acting out of fear and living as bystanders. And that’s not going to cut it anymore.

    Leadership at its heart is about we the people, it’s not about a self-serving agenda.

    There is a deep cry, a true plea for leadership. We are looking for leaders who will hold themselves accountable—to humanity, to character, to virtue.

    If you want to make an impact, there’s no better time. Now is your chance.

    There is a gap in our leadership and we need you to fill it. We need to you say something and do something.

    We are looking for those who have been bystanders to stop being fearful, to take a chance and challenge the status quo. If you are waiting for permission, here it is. If you are waiting for approval, we approve.

    We are looking for you… to lead us with heart.

    Lead from Within: Leaders become great not because their power, but becasue of their ability to empower others.

     

    Learn more about the gaps that exist in my National Bestseller book:
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     
    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post Here’s Why You Can’t Afford to Just Stand By And Watch appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 11:10:04 on 2017/06/27 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , teams, The Leadership Gap,   

    The Story of Everybody, Somebody, Anybody And Nobody 


    Recently I told a group of leadership executives a simple but meaningful story that you may have heard before. It’s the story of four people named Everybody, Somebody, Anybody and Nobody.

    Here’s the story, titled “Whose Job Is It, Anyway?”

    There was an important job to be done. Everybody was sure that Somebody would do it. Anybody could have done it, but Nobody did it. Somebody got angry about that, because it was Everybody’s job. Everybody thought Anybody could do it, but Nobody realized that Everybody wouldn’t do it. It ended up that Everybody blamed Somebody when Nobody did what Anybody could have done.

    The story may be confusing but the message is clear: no one took responsibility so nothing got accomplished.

    It’s a story that plays out often in organizations and companies and on teams—anywhere there is culture that lacks accountability.

    But how do you get people to take responsibly for their work? Different things work in different situations, but here are some strategies that have proven to be effective:

    Become a role model. You can’t tell people what to do if you yourself aren’t willing to hold yourself to the same level. If you want people to act responsibly, you have to be accountable. Your team and your company look to you for direction.

    Don’t make assumptions. Don’t assume that others know instinctively what to do and when to do it, or even what you expect from them. Before people can take responsibility for their work they require clear communication. The more you communicate, the better the results are likely to be.

    Set the standard. If you expect excellence, it’s up to you to set the standards for results and performance. Make each task or goal measurable and set it on a reasonable timeline so it’s achievable. Give people a clear target and they’ll work to reach it—and maybe even surpass it.

    Get the buy-in to go the distance. You need people to buy in and commit if you want to succeed. Each vision should be compelling; each goal should build toward the whole; each task should be laced with motivation. You need people to feel compelled, inspired and motivated to take responsibility.

    Make regular check-ups. One of the biggest reasons people fall short is a lack of follow-through by leadership. Help people stay focused by setting up regular checkpoints—phone calls or meetings where everyone can communicate and catch up, staying focused on moving forward and being accountable. When people know there will be check-ups, they’re less likely to procrastinate and more likely to hit their targets.

    Provide support and training. Especially with a start-up or a new initiative, people are taking on projects or tasks that they’ve never faced before. Make sure everybody has the training and resources they need to be successful, and provide help in resolving any issues that may arise.

    Encourage candor. One of the worst things that can happen to a team is for people to feel uncomfortable discussing problems and expressing their honest opinions. Build a culture of candor so that people know it’s the norm to tell the truth, even when it’s difficult or awkward.

    Concentrate on solutions and not only problems. If people are having problems or falling behind, expect them to come to you with possible solutions, not just the problems. Create an expectation that the first response to a problem is to start finding solutions.

    Praise performance. Praise people for good results and be specific with your acknowledgment. Let them know what they did well and how their work is affecting others. If they fall short, coach them privately and let them know how they can improve. And if their performance does not improve, also address this with meaningful consequences that have been explained ahead of time.

    To avoid having your team become Everybody, Somebody, Anybody and Nobody, commit to becoming the kind of leader who takes responsibility for your own life and leadership.

    Lead from within: Don’t let Anybody (or Everybody, Somebody or Nobody) stop you from doing what you need to do to create the kind of leadership and life you can be proud of.
    Learn more about running great teams in my National Bestseller book:
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post The Story of Everybody, Somebody, Anybody And Nobody appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 15:41:46 on 2017/06/21 Permalink
    Tags: Chris Winfield, , , , , The Leadership Gap   

    5 Unconventional Leadership Books You Need to Read 

    “Today a reader, tomorrow a leader.”
    ―Margaret Fuller

    Want to know one of the “secrets” to becoming a better leader? Become a more voracious reader.

    One of the best ways to “stand on the shoulders of giants” is to read. We hear it all the time–that the most successful people, our greatest leaders, are people who read constantly (including Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, and Warren Buffett).

    Reading for leaders is a way to broaden their knowledge, to expand their world view, to gain insight and widen their perspectives.

    But the secret is knowing what to read. Not every book will get you where you need to be. Here is my list of the top five books you must read if you want to become a more successful, well-rounded leader.

    #1. The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness by Lolly Daskal

    “If you want to get your leadership right, you have to get yourself right.”

    In The Leadership Gap, Lolly Daskal reveals the consequences that highly driven, overachieving leaders face when they continue to rely on a skill set that has always worked for them but is no longer effective.

    continue Reading

    Article on Inc Written by Chris Winfield

    The post 5 Unconventional Leadership Books You Need to Read appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 14:48:22 on 2017/06/21 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , The Leadership Gap,   

    Um… Excuse Me… “Your Gaps” are Showing [Becoming a Great Leader Especially if You Are Not One] 

    The Leadership Gap

    Some books connect with you because they align with your beliefs. Other books connect with you because they inspire you to be better. Still others connect with you because they open your mind to new possibilities. Lolly Daskal’s new book, The Leadership Gap, did all three for me. It will probably connect in all three ways with you as well.

    What stands between you and greatness?

    Continue Reading

    Article posted on Linkedin written by

    The post Um… Excuse Me… “Your Gaps” are Showing [Becoming a Great Leader Especially if You Are Not One] appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 14:32:05 on 2017/06/21 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , The Leadership Gap   

    The 7 Essential Leader Archetypes And The Hidden Gaps That Accompany Them 

    Have you ever wondered why some people are able to stand in their greatness as leaders, and evolve and grow even in the face of extreme challenges, while others falter in their gaps? There’s been volumes and volumes written about great leadership today, but much of it doesn’t look at how we can honestly and deeply evaluate our own blind spots and gaps, and close them, so we can reach our highest potential as leaders and influential forces for good in the world.

    Lolly Daskal seeks to change that. A sought-after executive leadership coach, Lolly has spent over three decades working with top leaders from business, government, and nonprofit sectors around the world. She is the founder and CEO of Lead from Within, and her leadership programs bring together modern philosophy and science along with the wisdom born of her varied, in-depth experience.

    Continue reading

     

     

    The post The 7 Essential Leader Archetypes And The Hidden Gaps That Accompany Them appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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