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  • feedwordpress 09:00:23 on 2022/11/08 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , teams,   

    4 Big Obstacles That Are Standing In The Way Of Your Team’s Greatness 


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    As I coach leaders around the world and in all kinds of industries, I always find it fascinating to gather as much data as I can. One question I often ask my clients is “What are the obstacles you encounter in working to create a great team?” Here are the four barriers that are cited most often:

    Corporate bureaucracy. Having to work around bureaucracy is one of the top issues I hear about from clients. Why does everything have to be so complicated? While many companies are turning to more flexible models, far too many are still being run as old-fashioned bureaucracies. It’s a structure that stifles creativity, innovation and motivation. It foster blind spots and dehumanizes an organization’s culture. Building a strong team in a bureaucracy is an uphill battle. Any time you’re able to advocate for adopting a more modern structure, give it your all. Meanwhile, you’ll have lots of opportunities to practice patience.

    Lack of resources and talent. Many companies can’t properly manage their resources or their people. They don’t know which assets are available or best suited to the task at hand. As a result, resources and talent are spread too thin, causing projects to be understaffed and underequipped. The result? A system of inefficiencies that forces teams to put in longer hours to meet project goals, leading to burnout and frustration. Do what you can within your own team to make sure resources and people are well managed.

    Lack of clear direction. Without clear direction and priorities, people don’t know what they should be doing. They aren’t sure what’s urgent or important, and without a big-picture view they end up jumping from one task and one crisis to another. As the leader of your team, you need clear direction from those above you so you can pass it along. If that isn’t happening, provide as much structure and information to your people as you can. A direction that energizes, orients, and engages them will be the foundation of their best work. Teams can’t be inspired if they don’t know what they’re working toward.

    External market factors. Effective leaders know how to minimize discouragement and promote positive dynamics. But even the best can’t control market factors and other external issues. There will always be outside factors that impact your team’s work, but by working to build effective controls and a strategic approach you can empower them to bring their best in any situation.

    At the bottom line, building a great team requires strategy. With careful planning, you can set the right direction, allocate the right resources and talent, and work as effectively as possible around the corporate and external factors you can’t control. Whatever the situation, your strong leadership can drive your team to deliver impactful success.

    Lead from within: If you want a great team, eliminate the obstacles that get in their way, so they can stand in their greatness.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    The post 4 Big Obstacles That Are Standing In The Way Of Your Team’s Greatness appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:49 on 2022/10/11 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , teams,   

    12 Powerful Ways Leaders Can Help Their Team Be More Successful 


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    Great leaders know they have the power to influence their team’s success. They understand that truly great leadership is about building people up, trusting and empowering them to give their best for a shared goal. Here are 12 of the most powerful ways leaders can create dynamic teams:

    Create direction. Providing direction is literally the charge of a leader, so know where your team is headed. Once you have a direction you can create a strategy and execute on the plan.

    Ensure that they have adequate resources and training. Don’t just enable your team members to do their current job. Help them to identify room for advancement and develop their skills. Make sure they have the resources they need to excel and reach the next level.

    Provide challenges and opportunities. Get to know the strengths and weaknesses of your team members, and use that knowledge to bring out the best in them.

    Establish priorities. If you want your team to focus on what’s most important, let them know what that is. When you leave things open ended, people are uncertain and workflows get muddled.

    Show your confidence and conviction. When you show confidence in your team’s skills and conviction, you send a message that they’re not just capable  and qualified but also powerful.

    Build on your team’s strengths. Great leaders are able to quickly recognize the skills and expertise of their team members. When you seek out people’s talents, you acknowledge their value—and few things are more motivating.

    Collaborate effectively. It is important that a team’s leader is a great collaborator, someone who can forge great relationships. Working together with your team increases trust and transparency, which is at the core of effective teams.

    Empower and inspire your team. Give your employees the authority to voice their opinions and take ownership of opportunities. People do more when you trust them to do more.

    Communicate, communicate, communicate. Communication is key to a successful and dynamic team. Keep everyone in the loop to make sure everyone has the knowledge they need to stay focused. Craft your messages to inform and inspire.

    Hold a positive attitude. A leader’s optimism lights up the workplace. Set an example of positivity, and remember that fun and hard work aren’t mutually exclusive!

    Acknowledge and reward. Noticing and appreciating everyday effort as well as extraordinary success has a huge impact. Thank your team at every opportunity, private and public, and reward them in tangible ways whenever you can.

    Build mutual respect. You demonstrate respect for your team when you engage with them and work alongside them. And when you show respect, it’s contagious. Leaders who respect their team encourage members to respect one another.

    Lead From Within: Great leadership builds great teams. When you invest in people and show confidence in them, they’ll show you great work.


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    The post 12 Powerful Ways Leaders Can Help Their Team Be More Successful appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:45:41 on 2021/03/23 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Enabling, Helping, Hurting, , , , , teams, , ,   

    How to Know If Your Leadership Is Helping Or Hurting? 


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    In my work as a leadership coach, I see lots of leaders who are constantly in fixing mode—any time there’s a problem they jump in to take care of it. Their only thought is to help. But I always ask them, “Are you helping? Or are you unintentionally hurting the people you lead?”

    Here are some ways you may be doing harm as you’re trying to help:

    You don’t give your employees a chance to show what they’re capable of. Allow people to show you why they were hired and how much they can do. One of your most important abilities as a leader is to let people shine.

    You tell people what to do instead of letting them show you what they can do. Telling people what to do isn’t leadership, it’s direction. Leadership means creating a space for others to accomplish their best.

    You’re constantly speaking and don’t allow others to express their opinion. Listening only to your own voice harms your credibility and disempowers your leadership. Power doesn’t come to those who speak the most but to those who listen best.

    You provide solutions to problems other people should be solving. You should not be the fixer of all problems. Period. Allow your people to develop solutions—their abilities will grow and they’ll come up with things you might not have thought of.

    You complicate simple business processes. Keep things as simple and uncomplicated as possible. People have enough to do without the bother of unnecessary bureaucracy and complicated processes.

    You act like an expert when you’re not. The best leaders never feel the need to come across as the smartest person in the room or to pretend they know everything. They listen to learn and they give others a chance to be impressive.

    You say things like “I know best.” Even if you know you’re right, it’s far more effective to guide people into the answer through dialogue and communication. People want to know they’re contributing, not just following orders.

    You give rewards where there hasn’t been effort. In many companies where I coach, it’s common practice to give bonuses regardless of the effort people put in. This approach only creates a culture of mediocrity.

    You play favorites with your team. For any leader, fairness builds trust and trust is everything. Treat everyone with the same respect and be equitable in providing opportunities.

    You say you’re going to do something but you don’t. Any time you don’t keep your word, your leadership loses respect and credibility.

    You shame, criticize or blame others publicly in meetings. As the saying goes, appreciate in public and criticize in private.

    You accept mediocrity. In leadership as in other things, what you accept is what you get.

    Lead from within: Most leaders have good intentions, but those intentions sometimes lead to bad results. Try to keep your eye on the consequences of everything you do as a leader and ask yourself whether it’s helping or hurting.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Know If Your Leadership Is Helping Or Hurting? appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:58 on 2021/02/09 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , teams, ,   

    How to Cultivate Psychological Safety at Your Workplace 


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    Psychological safety is still a fairly new concept, but its importance is being reinforced by a growing body of research, and it’s something that leaders everywhere should be thinking about—whether their teams are working in person or online.

    In a nutshell, psychological safety describes a state in which people feel free to ask for help, share ideas, seek feedback, admit mistakes, ask about what they don’t know, try new things, and voice their views.

    In too many organizational cultures, people hold back from sharing their thoughts and opinions out of fear that they’ll be seen as uninformed or disruptive. They don’t want to take a chance on being ridiculed, disregarded, or punished with a negative performance appraisal or other career-damaging responses.

    Research has shown that in the absence of such threats, team members are far more likely to bring their whole selves to work. They feel free to express their creativity, talents and skills without censoring or silencing themselves, and they know they can learn actively on the job instead of trying to pretend they know everything.

    Here are six simple steps toward creating a psychologically safe environment in your workplace:

    Treat people the way they want to be treated. Set the Golden Rule aside. Don’t treat others the way you would want to be treated but as they want to be treated. When you can see from your employees’ point of view, you’ll understand how to make sure they feel valued and understood.

    Encourage healthy conflict. Create conditions where respectful conflict is welcomed. Encouraging people to debate their ideas sharpens everyone’s thinking. Give serious consideration even to off-the-wall ideas, because one of them may someday prove to be invaluable.

    Allow all voices to be heard. Make sure everyone in the room knows they can speak their mind and express their thoughts. Encourage broad participation instead of the too-common situation where the same people tend to dominate every discussion. You can benefit from your team’s diversity only if everyone has a voice.

    Warrant and widen trust. Trust is a foundational element of psychology safety; it signals the mutual respect in which people are comfortable being themselves and speaking their minds. Be generous in extending trust.

    Foster engagement and innovation by reducing stress. Don’t view people as a means to an end. Work to help them feel valued and secure and free of unnecessary stress, and they’ll become more engaged, more innovative and more productive.

    Get comfortable with being uncomfortable. Replace perfectionism with a culture where people can present half-baked ideas, make risky statements and question assumptions.

    Ultimately, psychological safety is about providing a space where people feel free to be their full selves—something every leader should be working for anyway. Give people room to feel and think and create and be true to themselves—and in return, they’ll give you their best efforts.

    Lead from within: Psychological safety is good for business, good for teams and employees, and good for the leaders who cultivate it.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Cultivate Psychological Safety at Your Workplace appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:56 on 2020/09/03 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , Team Charter, teams, , , , ,   

    How to Keep Your Remote Team On The Right Track 


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    Something I’ve been hearing lately from my executive leadership coaching clients is that their teams aren’t functioning as well remotely as they were when they worked face to face. Among the top symptoms productivity and effectiveness have decreased.

    Frustrating as it is, none of this is surprising. Remote teams have a different dynamic then in-person teams. One significant difference: they need a little bit more attention and clarity up front. Here is a simple but meaningful process I use in coaching remote teams to be successful and stay on track:

    Articulate why the team exists. Set aside some time for the team to work together on articulating and communicating their “why.”

    Ask your team
    What kind of team are we and what are we trying to accomplish?
    Does our work reflect our stated purpose?
    Have we gotten distracted, or are we staying true to our purpose?

    Identify the circumstances. Clarify who the team is accountable to and how accountability is reported. List any other individuals and groups that are involved in the team’s work and define their involvement.

    Ask your team
    Are we coordinating well with others who rely on our work?
    Are we meeting stakeholders’ expectations?

    Determine your goals. Define the outcomes that are expected from the team’s work as well as milestones, deadlines, and how results will be assessed.

    Ask your team
    Do the measured results of our work accurately demonstrate its value?
    Is anything getting in the way of our success?

    Decide on roles and responsibilities. Consider each team member’s strengths and perspective as you determine which individuals and small groups will be responsible for which elements.

    Ask your team
    Are roles clearly defined and executed?
    Are we making good use of a variety of skills and perspectives?

    Establish work processes. Decide together how the team’s work will be done. Be concise but make sure the essentials are clearly defined: how often the team will connect and meet and who will manage the agenda, how delays and snags will be handled, and how people working from outside the team will be managed. List things out step by step so everyone has the clarity they need.

    Ask your team
    Are our work processes effective? Do they foster creative thought and innovation?
    Are we sticking to what we agreed to?
    What new processes might help us be more effective?

    Settle on decision-making. Make sure everyone on the team understands their level of autonomy and how decisions at every level will be made. Determine whether the overall approach will be one of seeking consensus among the group’s members or relying on the expertise of those charged with each element. Outline how decision points will be raised and resolved and who has the final say.

    Ask your team
    Are we including the right amount of input?
    What surprises or frustrations have we encountered in the past?
    How might we do it differently?

    Clarify communication. Especially with a remote team, you can never communicate too much, but coordinating communication keeps people from being bombarded with so many messages that they miss things they need to know. Decide how routine and nonroutine communication will take place and determine which conversations will be archived.

    Ask your team:
    How well is our current communication plan working? Are we sticking to it?
    What methods are working particularly well? |
    What are we not doing so well?

    Verify expectations. Make sure that each team member understands what is expected of them and what they can expect of one another, and that operating principles and conflict resolution processes are clear.

    Ask your team
    Are we adhering to the objectives we created?
    Are they helping us achieve our objectives?
    What norms do we want to add or delete?
    How can we be better in the future?

    The better you define your overall objectives, resources, constraints, roles, processes and expectations, the less confusion and the fewer complaints you’ll experience. A great team charter keeps everyone informed and working toward the same goal.

    Lead from within: When you can be clear on where you are going and why, and what you have to do to be successful, people perform at their best.


    #1 N A T I O N A L B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Keep Your Remote Team On The Right Track appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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