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  • feedwordpress 08:00:53 on 2019/08/13 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , teams,   

    How to Build a Team That Resolves Conflict Effectively 


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    Many leaders make the mistake of thinking they have to resolve every conflict—especially those that affect their team. But the best leaders know that is not the case, they learn to empower their employees by guiding them, giving them the resources they need and incentivizing them to work things out on their own.

    Here are six simple techniques to foster healthy conflict resolution within your office:

    Lead by example. It’s one thing to tell your team what they need to do, and another to hold yourself accountable for your own actions. However you’re personally dealing with conflict, those who report to you will likely follow your lead. To set a good example, pay attention to each person’s perspective, practice good listening skills, accept constructive feedback, and try to create an inclusive environment where differences are respected and honored.

    Coach your team. Every team has conflict—that’s just the norm—but it’s the leader who can coach their team through times of conflict who makes the biggest difference. The best leaders give their employees tools and techniques for mediation and conflict resolution.

    Establish ground rules. Every team needs to know the standards under which they will operate and collaborate. When you equip people with clear expectations and processes, they always know how to respond appropriately.

    Give regular feedback. An annual performance review isn’t nearly enough to prevent and resolve conflict. It is far more effective to have regular feedback sessions with your immediate team. These meetings can help cultivate an atmosphere of open and honest communication, and they present a good opportunity to deal with any misunderstandings or divisive issues before they get out of hand.

    Incentivize your employees. The best way to instill a new practice and keep it going is to provide incentives. They can take many forms—coaching, training, feedback, evaluations, or reward systems. Every leader needs to look at their team and organization and decide what works best for their culture.

    Celebrate successes. When team members successfully resolve internal conflicts, it should be celebrated and acknowledged. An appreciation of successful resolution will help build morale and encourage people to continue following core values and meeting high standards.

    Building a strong effective team that takes conflict in stride starts with leading by example and builds with good coaching, guidance and support.

    Lead from within: Conflict is inevitable. It is leading by example and coaching your team that you can best help them learn to resolve conflicts effectively and efficiently.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Build a Team That Resolves Conflict Effectively appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:14 on 2019/04/11 Permalink
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    What Happens When Your Team Turns On You 


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    As a leader, you want to think that your team would never turn on you, but it does happen—even to the most confident and competent of leaders. Maybe drama from another part of the organization has spread, or a charismatic team member has developed a grudge against your leadership, or you’ve inherited (or unwittingly created) a bad situation. Whatever the reason, it’s both discouraging and demoralizing when you find yourself with your team in mutiny—refusing to do what you ask, or going in their own direction, or excluding you from things you need to know and decide.

    The way you respond in such a situation is critical. Here are the steps you can take to regain your team’s trust and commitment:

    Acknowledge the problem. The first step can be the hardest—you have to get it out there. If you don’t address what’s happening, it will only get worse. Talk to your team as soon as possible. Be open, direct, and vulnerable. Opening up lines of honest communication is the first step in restoring your leadership.

    Work to understand the source. Try to get the clearest and most complete understanding possible of what caused the problem in the first place. Ask questions of your team to get to the root of the issue. Even if it’s uncomfortable, you want to find the source of the breakdown.

    Encourage people to express themselves. Allow people to air their grievances and let them speak their mind. With respect and without judgment, open up a space for expression. Tell people to come to you if they have a problem with you, then demonstrate your willingness to listen and deal with the issues. This foundation will help in solving the current problem and will also prevent recurrences.

    Take ownership. This step may be difficult, especially if you honestly believe you haven’t done anything wrong, but if enough people are telling you there’s a problem with how you lead, communicate or work, you need to take ownership. As I always tell my clients: what you don’t own owns you. This step is a big one in reclaiming your leadership. One of the hallmarks of great leaders is the ability to take feedback as a gift and take ownership of their mishaps, so consider it a time of learning and growth rather than punishment.

    Ask for help. This step is another one that may be difficult, because too many of us feel asking for help is a sign of weakness. But in fact the opposite is true: when you ask for help, you’re demonstrating that you have strength to find and use every possible resource to reach your goal.

    Work on a solution. The biggest problems can have the best solutions. Work on solving the issue by addressing it head-on. Make a plan for implementing change and let people know they’ve been heard. The best leaders treat problems as opportunities to do things better the second time around.

    Hire a coach. Connect with a coach or consultant who can help you navigate your way back to calmer waters. Working with a coach will show your team that you’re taking their feedback seriously, that you’re addressing your weaknesses and committed to doing better. It can also help you understand your leadership style and the disconnect with your team.

    Lead from within: If your team turns against you, turn back toward them to help improve the situation for everyone.

     


    N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post What Happens When Your Team Turns On You appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:30 on 2019/03/11 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , teams,   

    This is the Best Way to Manage Your Team 


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    In business, today we seem to focus more on the exciting parts of our work—innovation and creativity—and less on the day-to-day requirements of leadership. It’s great when you have an organization that’s all about speed, agility, innovation, and creative thought, but it’s your job as the leader to make sure that people understand the vision, that the work’s getting done, that the necessary results are being achieved. Without leadership, you won’t have coherence or consistency—or success.

    A great leader needs an extensive set of skills, from planning and delegation to communication and motivation. It’s tempting to focus your growth and development on the areas where you’re already comfortable or those that offer the most excitement. But for long-term success, it’s wise to analyze your skills across the board and challenge yourself to improve in every area.

    Here are some of the most important everyday things you can do to lead your team well:

    Maintain good communication. As a leader, you have to keep everyone informed about projects, goals, and deadlines, so it’s essential that you communicate well. When you are open with your team they’ll be open with you, creating opportunity for dialogues, feedback, and any questions or issues they want to address (and shutting down gossip and rumor mills in the process).

    Build meaningful relationships. Get to know members of your team individually—personally as well as professionally. When you put the effort in to get to know a bit more about the people you work with, and you better understand who they are and what they do, everyone works more productively and effectively.

    Delegate effectively. Delegation is key to great leadership. People perform better and are more engaged in their roles and responsibilities when they feel their skills and talents are recognized and put to use, and when you know the strengths and goals of each person it becomes easier to delegate strategically. The benefits are twofold: Your team members grow and learn under your supervision, and you can achieve much more.

    Manage conflict. When there is conflict—and there is always conflict—make sure not to ignore it but to address it and manage it. Turning a blind eye or hoping it goes away on its own can lead to a negative atmosphere, which in turn can affect the whole team and ripple out into the organization. It is crucial to address and manage conflicts in way that people feel understood and know that a solution can be reached.

    Be decisive. To lead a team well you have to be decisive, willing to hold strong opinions along with an open mind. Decisiveness doesn’t mean you aren’t open to learning but that you have a clear vision and can translate it into bottom-line decisions. Strong decision making that aligns with your organization’s values and the needs of your team brings great results.

    Appreciate hard work. Don’t be one of these leaders who doesn’t respect effort or who thinks hard work is just the minimum that people should do. Express appreciation for effort and hard work and do it often, because those who feel recognized and valued will continue to work harder than those who don’t. Appreciation builds confidence and engagement.

    Lead by example. People look up to leaders. They are constantly watching you and seeking your guidance, support and coaching, so it’s imperative that you set a good example, Whatever expectations you have of others, set the example yourself. Act in the ways you want others to emulate.

    Lead from within: There are many ways to manage a team, but to lead a team takes range of specific skills that are practiced and repeated daily.


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photo

    The post This is the Best Way to Manage Your Team appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:18 on 2018/10/29 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , teams,   

    6 Powerful Habits of The Most Productive Teams 


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    Every team has its own habits, but some habits—like some teams—are more effective than others. Building and reinforcing good habits can be the key to a cohesive and productive team. Make sure your team is supported with habits that will take them from vision to goals to achievement. Here are some of the best:

    Keep the safety net strong. Productive teams are not scared of failing or messing up. They’re not afraid to take risks and be vulnerable with each other, because they have the security of knowing no one will fault them if things go sideways. The essence of a great productive team is the combination of accepting risk while insisting on excellence. Every team member wants to know: Can I take risks without feeling insecure or embarrassed?

    Create structure and clarity. The best teams assign each member a clear role with clear plans, guidelines and goals. They make sure that they’ve fit the best qualified person in each key role on the basis of background and personality, and they make sure everyone has the training they need to meet high expectations. The result is an impressive structure and clarity that make effectiveness almost a given.
    Every team member wants to know: Are goals, roles, and execution plans clear? Do I know what’s expected of me, is it a good fit, and do I have the training I need to do it well?

    Work at an optimal pace. It’s not about speed but finding the right pace. If your team moves too quickly, burnout will soon begin to set in; too slowly, and things become stagnant. Productive teams know they have to find the right balance as they continue to grow and achieve. The environment in which teams operate is more important than ever. Every team member wants to know: Do I have to work around the clock to look productive, or can I pace myself to bring out my best work?

    Foster accountability and responsibility. Teams fail when no one holds the members accountable for success. Very few people can continue to function well without a structure in place to ensure consistent progress. The best teams reach their full potential when they are able to be accountable for their work and responsible for their results. Every team member wants to know: Can we count on each other to do high-quality work on time?

    Keep the big picture in view. It’s great to get a talented group of people together to do something well, but that work gains true significance when they know it has impact, that it will make a difference and create change. That awareness is the difference between a good team and a great team. Every team member wants to know: Do we fundamentally believe that the work we’re doing matters?

    Lead from within: For teams to become more productive, they need to master productive habits.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photos

    The post 6 Powerful Habits of The Most Productive Teams appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:30 on 2018/10/22 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , Mangaement, , , teams,   

    This is Why Failure Makes You a Better Leader 


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    “Success is not final, failure is not fatal:
    it is the courage to continue that counts.”

    ― Winston S. Churchill

    I teach and coach leadership to thousands of people each year—at conferences, lunches, events, and workshops, and in one-on-one coaching practice with leaders. And most of the time, the leaders I coach want quick fixes and perfunctory processes to achieve what they want to accomplish. Their true interest often lies in knowing how they can get to their goals more quickly and with less difficulty. But that’s not what growth is all about.

    What I know from my experience as a leadership coach is that growth comes with struggle and achievement is earned through repeated failures. There’s no way to shortcut the experience that doesn’t also shortchange the outcome. The most valuable things in life aren’t the ones that come easily.

    What I know from my experience as a leadership coach is that growth comes with struggle and achievement is earned through repeated failures. There’s no way to shortcut the experience that doesn’t also shortchange the outcome. The most valuable things in life aren’t the ones that come easily.

    To be a truly meaningful leader you have to embrace struggle and make failure part of your success story. Here are some of the ways failure is valuable and why it’s at the heart of most success stories.

    Failure teaches wisdom. Success feels good, but failure—as long as you don’t let it get the best of you—brings wisdom and growth. Leaders who have failed have a depth of understanding that can’t be obtained any other way.

    Failure breeds resiliency. Nothing in life creates resiliency like struggle and failure. Persistence and resilience come from working through difficult problems and still finding the will to keep going and take chances.

    Failure stretches potential. Until you’re tested, it’s hard to imagine being able to endure struggle. But failure, when it comes, can take you far beyond the limits you imagined for yourself. Every failure is an opportunity to rethink your own limits and realize how much stronger and more capable you are than you ever thought.

    Failure provides opportunities. Our natural impulse is to shy away from failure—nobody wants to take on a struggle—but when you eliminate adversity, you limit your potential. Failure provides you with additional resources and preparation to take advantage of the opportunities that come your way.

    Failure supplies motivation. Nothing else is as motivating as struggle. I’ve seen it many times over as a coach: defeat motivates people to concentrate harder, focus better and achieve more.

    Failure generates benefits. It may be hard to see when you’re feeling stuck in failure, but with the benefit of a little time and distance, you’ll be able to discover the benefits and the value of struggle. It’s a matter of looking at events through the lens of your eventual success.

    Lead from within: If you pursue success, welcome failure, hold on to hope and never lose your perspective, you’ll find there is something positive in every negative experience.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photos

    The post This is Why Failure Makes You a Better Leader appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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