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  • feedwordpress 08:00:13 on 2018/07/24 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Success, , Workplalce   

    Want to Be Your Own Boss? Here’s What You Need to Know 

    If you have an entrepreneurial spirit and have always wanted to be your own boss, there are few things you need to know. The key to long-term success is to set yourself up for success right from the start—and cultivating these six traits can help you get there.

    You need to be determined. According to the US Small Business Administration, more than half of small businesses fail within the first five years. They fail for a variety of reasons, but it often comes down to the entrepreneur’s reaction when things go wrong. It’s easy to give in to the desire to leave, but those who are determined will stay the course no matter what comes up or what gets them down. A few people succeed because they are destined; for most, it’s because they are determined.

    You need to be disciplined. If you’re used to relying on others to motivate and inspire you, now as your own boss you are going to have to learn self-discipline. A disciplined emotional state and mindset are at the heart of any successful business,  and the most important factor is your approach toward time and personal management.

    You need to become an expert. Sometimes the idea of being a boss sounds great because you can hire the right people to carry out your plans. But as a boss, you need to have experience and become an expert in your field. That means getting as much knowledge as you need, and the wisdom to be able to grow and run your business. Becoming an expert is an investment in knowledge that ends up paying the best interest.

    You need to be decisive. if you are serious about being your own boss, you are going to have to learn to be decisive. That means being specific and timely when it comes to the many decisions, large and small, that come along every day. I believe it’s our decisions, not the conditions of our lives, that determine how successful we can be. A true leader, one who makes a great boss, has the confidence to stand alone, the courage to make tough decisions, and the understanding that they are a product not of their circumstances but of their decisions.

    You need to build your network. You may be planning to go it alone, but you must know you cannot do it on your own. It’s important to connect with as many influencers in your field as you can. You never know where business will come from, and to keep your business sustainable you have to be able to engage in networking and make the right connections.

    You need to be financially secure. An essential step to becoming your own boss is figuring out the specifics of how you’re going to run your business. It’s important to have great ideas, but having access to enough cash to make those ideas successful is equally important, and financial security is often the biggest difference between starting a business and staying in business. There are many ways to get there—you can save the money you earn, or seek out investors, or even get a loan. Even the most successful entrepreneurial boss needs a cushion, one they can rely on both when they’re starting their company and as they run it. If you’re not realistic about your financial needs, your business won’t have a realistic chance of succeeding.

    Lead from within: The best part of being your own boss is that the more you put in, the more you get out. It won’t always be easy, but it’s in your control to succeed or not.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockphotos

    The post Want to Be Your Own Boss? Here’s What You Need to Know appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:39 on 2018/07/19 Permalink
    Tags: , Good Leadership, , , , , , Poor Leadership, Success,   

    How to Transform Poor Leaders into Good Leaders 

    John J. Pershing, a US Army general in World War I, once said, “A competent leader can get efficient service from poor troops, while on the contrary a poor leader can demoralize the best of troops.”

    Most teams and organizations are only as capable as their leaders—and that makes it important to help transform all the all the poor leaders around you into good ones. Here are some ways to recognize the weak leaders around you and help put them transform.

    Poor leaders fail to lead by example. They often ask others to do things they don’t want to do themselves. It may even be unintended, but the result is a loss of respect. Demonstrate for them how the best leaders roll up their sleeves and lead by example, always in with their team, always walking their talk.

    Poor leaders communicate ineffectively. Just as most people think they’re good drivers when many are not, most leaders like to think of themselves as good communicators. If you know a leader who likes to pat themselves on the back for their communication skills, show them how great leaders assess whether their message is getting through and work constantly to develop their ability to communicate effectively and meaningfully.

    Poor leaders are secretive and slow to share information. They’re stingy with the things they know and reluctant to help others benefit from their expertise. Their teams are closed off groups that treat information as power over others. Show these people that good leadership is open and transparent, communicating frequently and clearly and working to share their knowledge and expertise as widely as possible.

    Poor leaders encourage competition over cooperation. They enjoy pitting one person against another, saying that competition is good for the team. And it’s true to  a point—competition is good for the team, when makes them more productive and effective. But when it undermines the team itself, it’s an example of truly terrible leadership. Show them that success occurs when collaboration and cooperation, rather than competition, are at the forefront of a team’s dynamics.

    Poor leaders have low expectations. Some leaders try to fake success by minimizing challenges and setting a low bar for their team. This behavior often has its origin in a deep fear of failure. Show them how to challenge people to do better and be more, and that you get more when you expect more.

    Poor leaders are unable to empower their people. The core of leadership is being able to motivate or inspire a team, and if they can’t do that, they’re truly failing to lead. Show them how to bring out the best in others by helping them believe in themselves and their abilities, by providing encouragement, support and assistance when it’s needed, and by letting your team know you’re invested in their success.

    Poor leaders are always looking around, never ahead. It’s easy for weak leaders to become so preoccupied with day-to-day challenges that they neglect to prepare for what’s coming at them. Show them how to stop and look at the bigger picture so they can see potential problems sooner, focusing more on strategy and less on tactics.

    Lead from within: Even the worst, weakest leader has the potential to become not just a good leader but a great one.


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Transform Poor Leaders into Good Leaders appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:07 on 2018/07/03 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Energy, , , , , , , Success, ,   

    How Successful Leader Manage Their Energy Not Their Time 

    Many of the leaders I work with are anxious to hear tips on time management. But after working with business leaders and executives for over three decades, I’ve come to realize that the most effective and successful leaders treat time management as a secondary concern. For them, it’s energy management that produces real results.

    Most of my clients—and most leaders in general—have a lot to accomplish. When it feels like there aren’t enough hours in the day to do what you need to do, it’s all too easy to push yourself beyond your limits. As a result, you can become burned out long before you accomplish your goals.

    When I coach my clients on using their time effectively, the first step is to work on managing their energy. It can be challenging in our overscheduled and hurried world, but here are some of the fundamental principles:

    It’s about getting the rest you need. People try to get everything done in an all-nighter, but in fact the longer you stay up the less productive you become. It’s best to get a good night’s sleep and start fresh.

    It’s about quality, not quantity. I don’t know any business leaders who don’t have too much to do. It’s not about how much you can get done but how you get it done. Quality always wins out over quantity. It may even give you the zest to do more—it is a powerful feeling when you get things done with excellence.

    It’s about being present without being distracted. The best way to manage your energy and time is to be fully present with whatever, or whoever, needs your attention. When you have true focus, you can accomplish tasks twice as fast with more energy left over.

    It’s about taking small breaks. Multiple studies have found that you have more energy for the day’s tasks, especially work-related tasks, if you take short breaks throughout the day. Those can be as simple as five to 10 minutes of stepping away from your work space and getting into a different mental zone — for instance, taking a short walk, completing an unrelated task, listening to a favorite song or reading something else. Research suggests that distracting yourself briefly once an hour gives you more energy to work during the day productively.

    It’s about working out. You’ve likely heard it a thousand times already: exercise gives you endorphins, endorphins make you happy and being happy gives you energy. When you feel like you don’t have the energy to exercise and you drag yourself to the gym, you’ll leave feeling more energized. Numerous studies point to regular exercise as having a significant role in increasing energy levels and reducing fatigue.

    Lead from within: If you are truly mindful of your energy and you manage it well, you’re likely to become far more productive—and, as a result, a more effective leader.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post How Successful Leader Manage Their Energy Not Their Time appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:54 on 2018/06/28 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , Success, ,   

    7 Important Questions to Ask People You Admire   

    What if you suddenly found yourself sharing an elevator or seated at an event with somebody you admire, someone like, Warren Buffett, Elon Musk or Bill Gates? Would you stammer an introduction and look awkwardly at your feet, or would you be able to make the most of the encounter with a set of smart, concise questions?

    It’s unlikely you’ll ever meet any of those people, but you probably encounter other admirable people on a regular basis. Whether it’s a national leader in your field or the senior manager who works down the hall, here are some questions you can ask from the leaders you admire to learn from their success:

    1. What’s the biggest factor that has helped you be successful?
    Success is different for everyone, but it’s always interesting to learn how people arrived where they are. Their stories may point you in a new direction, give you an answer you’ve been looking for, or motivate you to push through the tough times. Responses also give you insight into their values and priorities.

    2. What are your success habits?
    Asking successful people about their daily habits can give you ideas for your own routines. The answers are rarely esoteric; generally, they’re actions anyone can take. As the old saying goes, we are what we repeatedly do.  Excellence, then, is not a quality but a habit, and successful people are simply those with successful habits.

    3. What mistakes have you made along the way?
    This question is one of the most important things you can ask anyone, because it allows you to learn from their experience. If you ask it often and listen carefully to the answers you hear, you will make fewer mistakes yourself. You’ll have insight into how to do things in a way that doesn’t lead to miscalculations or blunders.

    4. What was the hardest decision you ever had to make?
    Most successful people have had to make at least a few genuinely difficult between-a-rock-and-a-hard-place decisions. Learning what they chose, and why, gives you a close look at their thought processes and priorities, helping you prepare for the tough decisions that lie down the road for you. At the end of the day, it’s in your moments of decisions that your success is shaped.

    5. What is the best advice you can give?
    Some people respond better than others to such an open-ended question, but when it connects, it can cut right to the important stuff. Compile the responses you get to this question and keep them where you can read through them all from time to time.

    6. If you could start all over again, what would you do differently?
    Successful people tend to be self-aware, and it’s likely that they’ve already given this question some thought. You might expect to hear about preventing some mistake or failure, but successful people know that mistakes and failure are among our greatest teachers. Many focus instead on wishing they had taken more chances and been bolder.

    7. What’s one change I should make right now to help me get closer to my success?
    This question is appropriate to ask of someone who’s already familiar with you and your work. Improvement requires change, and sometimes the hardest part is knowing what needs to change.

    Most successful people are grateful for what they’ve achieved, and many are happy to share their knowledge and experience. It’s too good a resource to waste, so be prepared to make the most out of every encounter, especially with those you admire.

    Lead From Within: Just remember, we tend to become those we admire.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post 7 Important Questions to Ask People You Admire   appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 04:57:51 on 2018/06/16 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Success,   

    10 Bad Mistakes You Can Make as A New Boss 

    If you have plans of becoming a manager or taking on any leadership position, you can help yourself tremendously by being aware of the mistakes that hurt the reputations and relationships of new bosses. Here are the ten most common that I see in my work as a leadership coach. Check in with yourself periodically throughout your first year and make sure you’re avoiding these potholes, and before you know it you’ll be a well-regarded and seasoned leader.

    Trying to lead with a one-size-fits-all approach.

    Don’t assume that everyone needs the same kind of communication or motivation. The best bosses make an effort to become acquainted with those they lead as individuals and tailor an equitable approach that best connects with each individual on their team. Leadership is about investing your time and energy in getting to know those you lead and giving them what they need most.

    Poor communication.

    Even some experienced leaders have a hard time communicating well with their team. Good news is easy, but difficulties and problems are more challenging to communicate effectively. In my new book, The Leadership Gap, I talk about great leaders as great communicators and truth tellers. They’re honest and transparent with their team, even if the news is bad. Whatever’s going on, share it openly and involve others to come up with a solution. Honest communication builds trust and shuts down harmful rumor mills and gossip.

    Thinking that what got you here will keep you here.

    Many people are promoted to management because they’re rock stars in their field–but that doesn’t necessarily mean they have the managerial or leadership skills they need in their new role. Find a coach or mentor who can help you excel in the transition and teach you what you need to know to succeed and keep advancing.

    Trying to change everything right away.

    Making rapid wholesale changes is among the worst mistakes you can make in any position of authority. To earn respect, start by taking some time to understand the workplace culture and dynamics, then make any changes incrementally and with as much participation and buy-in from the team as possible. Listen and learn, and don’t change things that work well just because you can.

    Abusing power.

    Leadership is not about flexing your personal power but empowering others. That means you stand alongside those you lead and develop relationships that are collegial and mutually respectful. When you do, you’re more likely to discover a team of followers–not just subordinates–who work effectively, efficiently and happily.

    Failing to deliver difficult feedback.

    It’s natural to want to be liked, so too often new bosses avoid giving feedback–especially the difficult kind. But here’s the irony: if your leadership style is based on pleasing people and being liked, over time you’ll be seen as insecure, and you’ll become disliked and disrespected. If problems persist and challenges go unaddressed, your best people will grow frustrated, which in turn will lead to low morale and high employee turnover. Better to face up to what needs to be done.

    Staying isolated in the office.

    To be in a new position can be daunting, and wanting to make sure all goes well can keep you working long hours isolated behind closed doors. But that isolation is a big mistake. New leaders need to be visible, available and accessible. Your presence helps convey the message that you’re there to serve others and they can count on you.

    Not learning to delegate effectively.

    As a leadership coach I can’t count how many times I’ve heard this: “I’m new, I want to do things right, and if it’s going to be done right, then I have to do it myself.” Wrong! if you cannot delegate, you are not leading effectively. The only message you’re sending is that you’re a micromanager who doesn’t trust your people to do their jobs, and that reputation never leads to good results. Don’t make the mistake of trying to do everything all by yourself. Learn to trust those who have been hired to do their work–stand beside them but don’t control them. Give them the freedom they need to excel.

    Not knowing how to motivate others.

    It can be intimidating to be the new boss, but it’s imperative that you start by working to understand the motivation of your people–what drives them, compels them, excites them. From there you can fulfill your responsibility to nourish them into doing things they didn’t even know were possible. As I tell my clients, great leaders inspire those around them to do great things, and they do it by knowing what motivates others to excel.

    Failing to show appreciation.

    In their desire to hit the ground running and start racking up impressive accomplishments, new leaders often fail to recognize the contributions of others. When you focus only on results, you forget to acknowledge the effort, the talent and the performance. And when that happens, you team becomes less imaginative, less productive, and more likely to play it safe and just put in their hours.

    Every new role carries a need for new skills, and being a new boss is no different. Avoid these costly rookie mistakes and you’ll have a great start toward becoming the leader you are meant to be.


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post 10 Bad Mistakes You Can Make as A New Boss appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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