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  • feedwordpress 09:00:43 on 2018/03/13 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Strength,   

    Getting Everyone on the Same Page (Does More Harm Than Good) 

    Getting everyone on the same page—that is, creating unity of thought and opinion—is a concept that’s highly valued by many leaders. It’s widely thought to make teams more productive and creative. But in my years of experience, that connection is far from reliable. If anything, just the opposite applies: getting everyone on the same page does more harm than good.

    The idea behind this “same page” fixation is that a unified team culture is superior. And that’s true to a limited degree—for example, a sense of shared purpose lends strength to any team. But when you don’t invite and accept differences you weaken creativity, you decrease innovation, and you reduce individuality.

    When you try to make everyone think alike, work alike, and believe alike, you weaken and demotivate the talented and skilled people you’ve hired. You may think you’re building a team, but in reality you’re undermining them.

    Don’t allow yourself to be lured into the “everybody on the same page” trap. Instead, commit to the kind of leadership that builds unity through diversity on your team, by doing the following:

    Appreciate each person for who they are, not who you want them to be. Recognition is motivating, and great leaders appreciate their people for who they are. Instead of trying to mold them into an image of what you want them to be, learn to appreciate their authentic selves, their individual backgrounds, and their capabilities. A solid mix of talents makes for stronger teams and more innovative organizations. Being appreciated for their true self is incredibly uplifting for any employee.

    Identify individual’s strengths and push boundaries. Get to know each individual person’s strengths, then motivate and inspire them to raise their own standards. When you believe in people they will do what they can to come through for you. Work to understand, encourage, and develop your team members’ skills and potential.

    Invite each to contribute and collaborate in notable ways: Too often leaders feel threatened by their people’s capabilities and talents and may even work to suppress them. But encouraging people to excel at what they do best is the soul of leadership—and it leads to great results. Maximizing and meshing talents is how projects get done seamlessly. It’s how you meet deadlines and develop innovative solutions. Collaboration is what teams are built to do.

    Have everyone own their leadership. Work to have everyone find ways to step up and show leadership at some point. Start by assigning them leadership over small projects involving a handful of people. When you do, you build not only a team but a team of leaders—inspiring growth and helping your people advance. Leaders aren’t born, they’re made when you allow them to own their identity and capabilities.

    Great companies, leaders and managers all focus on collaboration and on developing each person’s capacities and having them bring their individual gifts to the collective effort.

    Lead from within: People who come together create progress, and succeed together, but it takes a diverse group to make it happen.

     


    N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    THE LEADERSHIP GAP

    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post Getting Everyone on the Same Page (Does More Harm Than Good) appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 10:00:13 on 2018/01/02 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , Strength, , , Weakness   

    How to Stop Seeing Struggle as Something Negative 

    Every company I speak to, every leader I coach, I see a constant pattern—virtually everyone sees struggle as something.

    At the heart of this perception, people get too caught up in the idea of struggle to consider what struggle at its core is all about. Most people cannot see themselves objectively, which leads them to fall into the gap of their own weaknesses and shortcomings.

    Faced with struggle, most people are likely turn to one of these four behaviors:

    Deny. Many refuse to acknowledge the role of their own weaknesses in their struggle.

    Turn around. Some accept their weakness but are always looking for a cul-de-sac so they can turn around instead of facing them.

    Change. Some change their direction altogether.

    Leverage. A few are able to accept their weaknesses and work to leverage them—to work on them and turn them into strengths.

    Faced with these options, your success depends on the choice you make:

    If you deny your weaknesses, they will own you. You’ll continue to constantly bump up against them, and you’ll likely continue to suffer.

    If you look for turnarounds, you will find yourself right where you started. There is no turning around from your weaknesses—just acknowledgement or avoidance.

    If you are looking to change, remember that change is good but takes hard work, discipline and consistent action to change longstanding old patterns.

    If you learn to leverage your weaknesses by learning to accept and acknowledge them, you will have found the most effective way to deal with your struggles.

    In my latest book, The Leadership Gap, I talk about how people make choices. In times of struggle, most people aren’t interested in leveraging their weaknesses. It’s human nature to deny them, dismiss them or learn to work around them. But life has a way of repeating the things we don’t want to deal with.

    So how do you leverage your weaknesses and let go of? There are four distinct things you can do:

    Stop comparing yourself to others. Focus on your own issues. The strengths and weaknesses and situations of other people don’t have anything to do with you. We all have something to work on, and the best way to leverage any weakness is to be true about yourself—to find out what you need to work on and to learn new skills and competencies so you can constantly be growing and developing. When you take the time to reflect on who you really are it will give you the ability to look at yourself, the world around you, and the relationship between you and the world with the deep insight that leads to wise new choices.

    Stop worrying. Worry has never achieved much besides feeding the struggle, so stop worrying and start thinking. What can you do today that will lead to small wins tomorrow? What actions can you take that will generate movement instead of stagnation? Connect with what you really want and what you need to do to attain it

    Stop blaming others. Don’t blame your bad decisions or your bad choices on anyone or anything else. This is your life and your struggle. Instead of finding others to blame for your struggles, search your own past and look for the origins of your weaknesses. Blaming others is a subconscious mechanism for avoiding accountability, but it’s still unacceptable. Making bad choices and struggling for them is part of life, and it’s immature to blaming others for those bad decisions.

    Stop the pain. There are two kinds of pain—one that just hurts you, and another that teaches you. Each of us can grow stronger from pain when we don’t allow it to destroy us. Unfortunately pain can stop progress and struggles can impede success, but the pain we feel today is the strength that will help us endure tomorrow.

    Strength and growth come though constant work and effort—and from struggle of every kind.

    Lead from within: Successful leaders are those who can look beyond a struggle or failure and manage the circumstances and situations as well as their response—things they can shape, adjust and change.

     


    N A T I O N A L B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post How to Stop Seeing Struggle as Something Negative appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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