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  • feedwordpress 09:00:19 on 2022/11/22 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , relationships, ,   

    7 Common Phrases That Can Ruin Your Leadership Credibility 


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    We’ve all been there: someone says something and you suddenly think I’m not sure I trust them now.

    Credibility is like a currency that never depreciates unless you do something to undercut its value. If people think you’re credible, they trust you. They listen to you, depend on you, and follow you. But if you undermine that credibility, it takes a long time to earn it back.

    In my work as a leadership coach, I help my clients learn to identify and avoid phrases that erode their credibility. Here are seven of the most common:

    “To be honest…” People who are telling the truth don’t have to make a point of it. If you tell people you’re telling the truth, you’re actually warning them to be on guard. When you plant doubt in people’s mind, they lose trust in what you’re saying—and in your overall credibility.

    “I’ll try.” In leadership, it’s important to be decisive and reliable. There is no room for “I’ll try.” If you’re going to do something, say so—and then make sure you do it. If you can’t make that commitment, don’t say anything. When you tell someone you’ll try, all you gain is sounding wishy-washy.

    “Let me get back to you on that.” This phrase may seem harmless, but it sounds like a dodge. Know your capabilities and speak with confidence. If you’re asked something you don’t know, say so outright: “I’m not sure, but I’ll find out.”

    “In my opinion…” This commonly used phrase undermines your point of view. Even if you don’t intend to, it carries a suggestion of bias. Instead, say “I think…” or “My experience suggests….”

    “I could be wrong.” You may be shooting for humility with this phrase, but it comes off as uncertain and unconvincing. If you state a fact, do so with confidence. If there’s a significant chance you’re wrong, lead off with something like “It’s possible…” or don’t say it at all.

    “On the up side…” When people hear this phrase, they know what’s coming: bad news with an attempt at comfort and possibly a poor attempt at humor. Don’t sugarcoat when you have something negative to communicate. Be forthright and honest, and you’ll always hold people’s trust.

    “This is probably stupid, but…” Why would you qualify one of your thoughts as stupid? If it’s genuinely stupid, it’s better left unsaid. If it’s a question, just ask. And if it’s an off-the-wall idea, pitch it that way without calling it stupid.

    When you’re in leadership, communication is one of the most important things you do. It’s how you convey information; just as important, it’s how you signal your credibility and strength. You can be honest and transparent without undermining yourself.

    Lead From Within: Trust, credibility and respect all depend on effective communication.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    The post 7 Common Phrases That Can Ruin Your Leadership Credibility appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:26 on 2022/11/01 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , relationships, , , Workplacek   

    10 Effective Ways To Encourage Your Employees To Speak Up 


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    A recent study showed that only 1 percent of employees feel comfortable voicing concerns in their workplace. But knowledgeable team members who feel empowered to speak freely are one of the best sources of feedback you can find. Here are some of the things I tell my executive coaching clients about building an open, honest exchange with their team:

    Start with an outsider. The beginning of this work is one of the rare times it’s better to hire an outside resource. Bringing in a third party to talk with people assures them that their replies will be anonymous, and it frees them to speak freely about management issues.

    Encourage candor. Make sure people know that “We want to know what you think” isn’t just lip service. Let them know that you really do want to know, and that they have a role in creating positive change.

    Listen to understand. When someone is voicing a concern, resist the temptation to respond defensively or jump in with suggestions. Keep quiet and focus on listening carefully. It takes some practice, but the simple act of listening is one of the best ways to encourage people to speak up.

    Mind your body language. Our body language sometimes speaks louder than our words. When you’re listening to feedback, make sure your face, body, and voice all signal openness and understanding.

    Encourage feedback in work groups. People who work closely together are usually relaxed and comfortable with one another. Encourage them to develop feedback in their work group meetings to help them speak their mind with more ease.

    Treat feedback as a gift. Especially if what you hear isn’t what you’d wish for, remember that it’s still an important source of help. Honor it as the valuable gift that it is.

    Keep conversation moving. In meetings where issues are under discussion, don’t let the usual one or two people dominate. Without pressuring anyone, encourage quieter employees to share their thoughts.

    Don’t be afraid of silences. When I facilitate workshops for organizations, long silences are common. Don’t rush in to fill silence with words—even if it’s awkward, give people time to persuade themselves that it’s OK to speak.

    Reward people for speaking honestly. Thank people for participating, and make sure your gratitude shows up officially in performance reviews. As people see that honest discussion is rewarded, they’ll be more likely to jump in.

    Share information. Be sure to share back what you’re hearing. The more people see results from employee feedback, the more likely they will be to speak freely.

    Employees withhold their voice because they think it won’t accomplish anything or fear damage to their own standing. It’s the leader’s job to show people their opinions will be taken seriously without consequences.

    Lead From Within: Speaking up and telling the truth aren’t always easy, but leadership means creating a culture where people can always say what’s on their mind.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    The post 10 Effective Ways To Encourage Your Employees To Speak Up appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:59 on 2022/09/06 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , relationships, ,   

    Why Every Leader Should Consider Improving Their Executive Presence 


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    One of the most important things I’ve discovered in my decades as an leadership coach is the importance of a leader’s presence. It’s one of those things that’s easy to recognize but hard to define, and that may be why so many leaders neglect it. “I’m just here to do a job,” is a common response when I bring up the issue with my clients. But your presence as a leader is just as important as your accomplishments.

    There may be signs that indicate that a lack of presence is limiting your career:

    • You’re often praised as being smart and capable, but you don’t get the promotions you deserve.
    • You have the feeling that something’s holding you back, but you’re not sure what it is.
    • You are constantly being told to polish your image or work on your public persona.

    But even in the absence of a clear need, every leader can benefit from working on their executive presence. Here are some questions to ask yourself:

    Do others view you as you view yourself? Presence is largely how we show up in relationship with others. And one of the most important steps you can take to build presence is to be aware of how you’re perceived. Then you can work to close the gap between how you see yourself and how others see you.

    Do the people around you feel heard and understood? Communication skills are pivotal in building presence. If you’re communicating at people instead of with them, you’re losing presence—and respect. Work to become a better speaker, writer and, most importantly, listener.

    Are you able to stay in control and display confidence? Staying in control of yourself in difficult situations is a sign of great leadership. Learn to project poise, calm and humble confidence, whatever you’re feeling. The qualities of a leader are contagious, especially in times of chaos and challenges.

    Do you allow people to experience their strength in your presence? In the past, leadership was usually defined in terms of a single individual’s strengths. But the field has evolved, and the ability to bring people together to collaborate and grow is now at the forefront. When people know you as someone who fosters relationships and development within your team, you automatically have presence.

    Ask yourself these questions, and then build the concepts around them into your own leadership development. Wherever you are on your leadership path, they can help you build an authentic executive presence—one that doesn’t just improve how others experience you but also helps you build the capacity for a more fulfilling and purposeful life.

    Lead from within: In our ever-changing business and leadership world, the ability to lead requires an awareness of self that is anchored in the key pillars of presence.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    The post Why Every Leader Should Consider Improving Their Executive Presence appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:35 on 2022/07/26 Permalink
    Tags: Acknowledgement, , , , , , , relationships, ,   

    How Great Leaders Acknowledge Their Employees Effectively 


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    Every great leader knows the benefits of investing in their employees, but too many don’t know how to carry out one of the strongest forms of employee investments: acknowledgement.

    In my work as a leadership coach, I’m able to work closely with leaders who are engaged in using acknowledgement to create a culture that keeps employees engaged, productive and fulfilled. It’s an approach with many benefits—including its effectiveness as a retention strategy. Here are some of the most important things you can do to acknowledge your employees:

    Give feedback that is actually a gift. For many leaders, giving feedback means advising employees about areas for improvement. But I am a big believer in the idea that if you give feedback on what works, you’ll get more of it in return. No one is perfect and it’s important to guide people in improvement, but recognition and praise make your feedback a valued gift.

    Listen to learn. My clients tend to be extremely smart. Like many leaders, they think they have all the answers—and sometimes they do. They lead with knowing what to say and do. But the best leaders make a point of listening to learn. They’re open to taking suggestions and they honor other people’s opinions. This kind of listening is foundation of making people feel valued.

    Make it personal. Leaders are busy people. But when you take the time to connect personally, you make people feel special. It may be a phone call, a handwritten note, or recognition of a personal achievement outside work. What are your employees interested in? How are they giving back to their communities? Practice appreciating and celebrating these achievements.

    Invest in their professional development. Employees who excel are always looking for ways to take themselves to the next level. If you can recognize and help meet this need, you can help them flourish and grow. If you don’t have funding for classwork and seminars, look for mentorships, professional associations, and other low-cost solutions.

    Promote self-care. People may be willing to give everything they have to a job they love, but the result of that dedication is often a lack of work–life balance. It’s important that you send the right message with your behavior as well as your words. If you’re the kind of leader who works seven days a week and responds to emails and messages 24/7, your behavior is adding to your employees’ stress. Don’t just talk about self-care and the importance of taking time away from work—set an example and create a culture that reflects those priorities.

    The bottom line of showing appreciation is letting your employees know you care about them. And there’s no better way to make that happen than to begin implementing some of these ideas. The results may change your organization and your leadership.

    Lead from within: Follow the best practices of great leaders by giving your employees the acknowledgement and recognition they deserve.


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    The post How Great Leaders Acknowledge Their Employees Effectively appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:40 on 2022/06/21 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , relationships, , The Future of Business, ,   

    Uncharted Waters: How to Navigate the Future of Leadership and Business 


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    Business always includes an element of unpredictability, and agility and flexibility are enduring requirements for successful leadership. But more than ever before we are operating in uncharted waters, and building long-term success in business and leadership means not just implementing new methods but creating a whole new mindset.

    When change comes this hard and fast, those of us who practice leadership need to move beyond working to complete the tasks before us and achieve the goals we’ve set. We need to be especially mindful of developing and nurturing sustainable leadership practices.

    The form of those practices can vary widely. In my work as a leadership coach, these are some of the points I’ve been making to my clients who are navigating new realities:

    Work to foster deeper and more enduring collaboration. In a world that’s daily growing more challenging, we need to rethink the ways we collaborate. New problems require new ideas, and often those ideas come from outside the usual channels. People working outside their area see things differently and can contribute a fresh vision that complements that of insiders. The key to bringing together a team with diverse backgrounds is to get them interacting around a central motivating factor—an approach that requires them to focus on the core nature of the business itself as well as the issue at hand. When you can create new partnerships and deeper bonds between people who have never worked together before, you maximize the collective intelligence of your team. The results? Innovation, success and longevity.

    Be relentlessly innovative. In the past, we may not have known exactly what the future would hold, but we knew—or thought we knew—its general shape. These days, when most of us look ahead all we can see is uncertainty. Business has become not only more complicated but also more complex. Complicated things are often still linear, with patterns you can see and control. In a complicated environment, efficiency is your friend. But complexity is different beast that above all requires creativity and innovation.

    Embrace adaptability. A leader who is agile and flexible is comfortable with being uncomfortable. They are resilient in face of adversity, and they aren’t fazed by disruption. I know many leaders who have given in to leading from fear. They’re hunkered down waiting for things to go back to normal. But as a coach, my job is to help my clients remember that what they do today is creating their future. Instead of hiding or playing wait-and-see, I help them learn to honor these moments and use them to drive change and innovation.

    In business and leadership as in all of live, the future may not be something we can predict, but it will always be something we can invent.

    Lead from within: To be the best leader you can be today, do the things that your future business and people will thank you for.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    The post Uncharted Waters: How to Navigate the Future of Leadership and Business appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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