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  • feedwordpress 08:00:50 on 2020/10/15 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , Potential, purpose, , , , ,   

    How To Make Sure You Are Living Up to Your Potential 


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    No matter how well you’re doing and how many skills you’ve acquired, you may not be fully living up to your leadership potential.

    If you suspect that you have untapped potential but you’re not sure how to reach it, start by working to discover what’s standing in your way so you can put yourself back on track to being the leader you know you can be.

    If you don’t know yourself: Self-understanding is critical to leadership. If you want to understand, motivate and inspire others, you have to begin with yourself. Hire a coach or find a mentor who can help you define your strengths, your gaps, and your style of leadership. All of us have gold hidden within, but we have to dig to get it out.

    If you’re self-centered: Top leaders spend much of their time thinking of others and finding ways to support them, coach them, mentor them and develop them. Great leadership consists largely of believing in others and helping them become great. If you aren’t already doing that, you need to take the focus off yourself. Start cultivating your empathy and devoting more of your time and energy to those around you.

    if your mindset is negative: Left unchallenged, negativity becomes weakness of character. Especially for those in leadership, it’s important to keep your outlook positive. Remember that thoughts become actions, actions become behavior and behavior becomes habit—and your habits play a huge role in achieving your potential. A positive mindset is the mark of a superior personality.

    If you play it safe: As I’ve seen many times over with my clients, few things will stall out your leadership potential more completely than constantly playing it safe. Getting yourself unstuck means having the nerve to take risks and make hard decisions when they’re needed. And ironically, playing it safe is one of the riskiest things you can do. To reach your top potential you will have to face your fear and do what you need to do in spite of it.

    If you don’t know and live by your values: People don’t become great leaders because they’re ambitious or committed to success; they become great leaders because they hold clearly defined values and align everything they do to those values. When you understand your own values and priorities and you commit to them, you gain the authority of authenticity and everything else falls into place. Hard decisions become easier and the people around you become your priority. Knowing and living your values is the key to great leadership.

    The best leaders begin by understanding themselves and finding the gaps they need to fill. They work on their own mindset and attitudes, and over time they come to realize that leadership is about serving others while you better yourself.

    Lead from within: The willingness to learn, the desire to risk, the urge to reach your full potential—these are the keys that will unlock the door to your leadership excellence.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How To Make Sure You Are Living Up to Your Potential appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:44 on 2020/09/22 Permalink
    Tags: , coach, , Hire A Coach, , , , , purpose, ,   

    Why the Best Leaders Ask For Help In A Crisis 


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    Even in the best of times, executives and senior managers sometimes need help with the pressures of leadership. In times of crisis, they face much greater challenges. How do you set a direction when the future is unclear? How can you ask for more from people who are already stretched thin, or ask people to bring their best when their job security isn’t even certain?

    Throughout a crisis, I work closely with my clients around the world to help keep them grounded. My role as a coach is to help leaders be more effective so they and their teams can be more successful. Here are some of the reasons why even great leaders turn to coaches at time like this:

    A coach helps you assess your state of mind. It’s important that leaders stay aware of their  physical, mental, emotional, and social state. They need to stay in top form as much as possible so they can make the tough decisions and model the behavior people expect of them. A coach helps leaders prioritize their own well-being and increase their effectiveness.

    A coach brings clarity and perspective. Coaches are skilled at helping leaders manage their energy and focus. They also give leaders the benefit of an outside perspective and provide a confidential space to test new ideas so they can navigate tough decisions with clarity.

    A coach is supportive and protective. Part of a leader’s charge is to be there for others, but they rarely have someone supporting and protecting them. Working with a coach gives them a trusted presence who can listen—not necessarily to provide a solution but to help them uncover their assumptions, ask smarter questions, and find solutions in unexpected places. Every leader needs an unbiased source of support.

    A coach builds value and helps to drive results. Especially in tough times, working with a coach helps leaders make the most of their limited time and resources so they can focus on obtaining results. Strong leaders always want to get ahead of changing circumstances, and outside counsel can help them not only navigate the crisis but understand the important lessons that come with it.

    A coach helps leaders engage for impact. In times of crisis, no job is more important than taking care of your people. At the same time, those who lead within organizations have to take into account the bigger picture. It’s easy to be distracted and unfocused when you’re facing shifting circumstances and unclear priorities. A coach can guide leaders in finding ways to keep people engaged and motivated—and, as much as possible, protected.

    Hiring a coach is helpful in good times, but it becomes essential in times of difficulty when leaders really need to be at their best.

    Lead from within: Leaders with a great coaching relationship are better able to navigate hardship and tap into the powerful learning opportunities they bring.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Why the Best Leaders Ask For Help In A Crisis appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:15 on 2020/09/17 Permalink
    Tags: , , Cheerleader, , , , , , purpose, , ,   

    Why People Who Want Their Leader to Be a Cheerleader Are Getting It Wrong 


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    Everyone needs someone to motivate and inspire them, whether it’s a parent or a minister or an athlete. People often look to their leaders for that kind of inspiration. And on the surface it makes sense: who wouldn’t want a leader who’s positive and encouraging compared to one who talks tough or is focused on outcomes rather than people? But wanting your leader to be your cheerleader is actually a big mistake.

    Don’t get me wrong—I believe that leaders should be inspiring and positive. But we need much more from those who lead us:

    We need leaders who will challenge us today so we can be better tomorrow. To be challenged can be uncomfortable, and it doesn’t always come with a feel-good message. Motivating people to achieve great things means stimulating and influencing and provoking them to do more and be more. It may not feel good in the moment, but often “You can do better—try again” is exactly what we need to hear.

    We need leaders who are straight shooters, not sugar-coaters. Not everything a leader has to say is positive. Growth requires someone who will be honest and direct and tell it like it is, and experiencing criticism expressed openly and honestly can make teams stronger and more productive. We miss out on lots of opportunities for learning and development when we’re surrounded by soft-pedaling critics.

    We need leaders who care less about being liked and more about being respected. Part of being a leader is making tough decisions. And if the leader is a good one, people will respect those decisions even if they dislike them. Leaders have to look at the big picture, and sometimes that means having the courage to do things that are unpopular—but those who are willing to make tough decisions for the good of all are ultimately the most admired.

    We need leaders who are experts, not enthusiasts. At the end of the day, do you want a leader who spends all day speaking lots of positive messages but doesn’t make a meaningful contribution to your team’s work? Far better to have an expert who is optimistic and skillful. There are plenty of leaders who try to make people feel good without giving them much to think about. But effective leadership makes you think—and then feel good about it.

    We all want bosses, managers and leaders who make us feel good, but it’s far more important—for ourselves and for our teams—that we find the people who can help us develop, grow and evolve. What we all need most is a leader we can trust and respect, one who will challenge us to discover our own motivation and become our own cheerleaders.

    Lead from within: The best leaders might not be the biggest cheerleaders but those who challenge us the most—and because they do, we respect them for it.


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Why People Who Want Their Leader to Be a Cheerleader Are Getting It Wrong appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:56 on 2020/09/03 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , purpose, Team Charter, , , , , ,   

    How to Keep Your Remote Team On The Right Track 


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    Something I’ve been hearing lately from my executive leadership coaching clients is that their teams aren’t functioning as well remotely as they were when they worked face to face. Among the top symptoms productivity and effectiveness have decreased.

    Frustrating as it is, none of this is surprising. Remote teams have a different dynamic then in-person teams. One significant difference: they need a little bit more attention and clarity up front. Here is a simple but meaningful process I use in coaching remote teams to be successful and stay on track:

    Articulate why the team exists. Set aside some time for the team to work together on articulating and communicating their “why.”

    Ask your team
    What kind of team are we and what are we trying to accomplish?
    Does our work reflect our stated purpose?
    Have we gotten distracted, or are we staying true to our purpose?

    Identify the circumstances. Clarify who the team is accountable to and how accountability is reported. List any other individuals and groups that are involved in the team’s work and define their involvement.

    Ask your team
    Are we coordinating well with others who rely on our work?
    Are we meeting stakeholders’ expectations?

    Determine your goals. Define the outcomes that are expected from the team’s work as well as milestones, deadlines, and how results will be assessed.

    Ask your team
    Do the measured results of our work accurately demonstrate its value?
    Is anything getting in the way of our success?

    Decide on roles and responsibilities. Consider each team member’s strengths and perspective as you determine which individuals and small groups will be responsible for which elements.

    Ask your team
    Are roles clearly defined and executed?
    Are we making good use of a variety of skills and perspectives?

    Establish work processes. Decide together how the team’s work will be done. Be concise but make sure the essentials are clearly defined: how often the team will connect and meet and who will manage the agenda, how delays and snags will be handled, and how people working from outside the team will be managed. List things out step by step so everyone has the clarity they need.

    Ask your team
    Are our work processes effective? Do they foster creative thought and innovation?
    Are we sticking to what we agreed to?
    What new processes might help us be more effective?

    Settle on decision-making. Make sure everyone on the team understands their level of autonomy and how decisions at every level will be made. Determine whether the overall approach will be one of seeking consensus among the group’s members or relying on the expertise of those charged with each element. Outline how decision points will be raised and resolved and who has the final say.

    Ask your team
    Are we including the right amount of input?
    What surprises or frustrations have we encountered in the past?
    How might we do it differently?

    Clarify communication. Especially with a remote team, you can never communicate too much, but coordinating communication keeps people from being bombarded with so many messages that they miss things they need to know. Decide how routine and nonroutine communication will take place and determine which conversations will be archived.

    Ask your team:
    How well is our current communication plan working? Are we sticking to it?
    What methods are working particularly well? |
    What are we not doing so well?

    Verify expectations. Make sure that each team member understands what is expected of them and what they can expect of one another, and that operating principles and conflict resolution processes are clear.

    Ask your team
    Are we adhering to the objectives we created?
    Are they helping us achieve our objectives?
    What norms do we want to add or delete?
    How can we be better in the future?

    The better you define your overall objectives, resources, constraints, roles, processes and expectations, the less confusion and the fewer complaints you’ll experience. A great team charter keeps everyone informed and working toward the same goal.

    Lead from within: When you can be clear on where you are going and why, and what you have to do to be successful, people perform at their best.


    #1 N A T I O N A L B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Keep Your Remote Team On The Right Track appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:40 on 2020/08/20 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , purpose, ,   

    How to Lead in an Anxious World 


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    We are living through a crisis with no modern-day precedent. Organizations of every size and type, from businesses and governments to hospitals and schools to faith communities and nonprofit organizations need leaders. We need people who can help others overcome their weakness and fear and come together to do better, more difficult things than any one of them could do on their own.

    But how does a leader bring inspiration and motivation in an anxious world? Here are some thoughts:

    Help people understand their stress. Especially in such a widespread, long-lived and exhausting crisis as the pandemic, it’s common for people to cope by trying to push their stress away. Some are reluctant to address their fatigue or even acknowledge their fears. The best leaders model healthy ways of viewing and dealing with their own stress, and they encourage others to own and address whatever they may be feeling.

    Encourage people to face their fears and take action. In the midst of the Great Depression, Franklin Delano Roosevelt famously told the nation, “We have nothing to fear but fear itself.” In other words, we have to meet the crisis head-on, because that is where we will find our strength. You cannot solve a problem until you face it, and you cannot find resolution in turning away. As a leader, you are charged with showing understanding to anxious people and then leading them to act.

    Deliver brutal honesty and bring people together in solidarity. Especially when those around you are anxious, it’s important to be brutally honest. Assess current and future threats frankly and transparently, because only then you can rally people together in solidarity, determination and resilience to weather the crisis collectively.

    Provide a purpose and distinct direction. When anxiety is present and fears are rampant, the best leaders invite people to serve with purpose in a defined direction. They assign clear roles and responsibilities and remind their team that their work matters and has value. When people know where they’re going and have a clear sense of the purpose, meaning and value behind what they’re doing, anxiety fades and focused action takes priority.

    Emphasize the power of agility and reassessment. When you’re hit by a crisis you’ve never experienced before, there’s no playbook or experience to guide your actions. That means you need to be a leader who can move through a changing landscape with flexibility, consistently testing what you’ve learned and reassessing your knowledge and strategy as you go. You will likely experience some blind alleys and reversals and failures, but they all play a role in moving through the crisis. Keep your message consistent with your actions, reminding your team that the crisis you’re experiencing gives you a powerful opportunity to do better and be better together.

    Lead from within: In a crisis the true leader will not waste any challenge. Instead, they will do what it takes to turn it into a memorable and meaningful opportunity.

     

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Lead in an Anxious World appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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