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  • feedwordpress 21:07:37 on 2018/04/16 Permalink
    Tags: , , Problem Solving, ,   

    Personal Tune-Up 

    tune_up_MMA Personal Tune-up for Peak Career Performance

    If you’re feeling more energized than usual these days, that’s because it’s Spring. As humans, we’re hard-wired to feel the boost that comes with warmer temperatures and fresh, new beginnings everywhere! Even in the cities, there are blooming flowers and baby birds. Life bustles – and we can’t avoid responding.

    To me, Spring is a wonderful reminder that I am not just a “mind” that thinks and focuses on work. I am also a body – of which my mind is a part. Humans are, in a way, a marvelous machine. You can feed your mind with all kinds of great information to benefit your career. But if you don’t feed your body with food (fuel) and exercise (tune-ups), then the machine begins to gum up or break down.

    To remain a star at work, here are some “personal tune-up” tips to put into practice daily for peak career performance:

     

    • Eat breakfast. You’ve heard it’s the most important meal of the day – and that’s right. Without fuel, you’ll crash, no matter how many cups of coffee you drink.

     

    • Walk once a day. Walking is the no-cost, easy way to keep your energy up and lose weight at the same time. Best of all, you don’t have to break a sweat or go to the gym! Just put on your tennis shoes at break time and go.

     

    • Take short breaks throughout the day. Even if you’re busy, step away for a few moments. You’ll return to your work refreshed and better able to focus.

     

    • Get plenty of sleep. Recent studies show that women, especially, are sleep deprived – which, over time, will reduce your effectiveness and career potential.

     

    • Tackle stress. What causes you to worry? What’s weighing you down? Write a list, and try tackling the items one at a time.

     

    Have a great week!

    joan_burge_signature

    The post Personal Tune-Up appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 17:03:56 on 2018/03/29 Permalink
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    Professional Development Value 

    Professional Development Value

    Dana Buchanan is a 20 plus year professional assistant and coordinator with a passion for writing. Last year Dana attended our Conference for Administrative Excellence but in order for that to happen, she needed to justify the budget and explain the benefits to her executive. In her latest blog entry, “Professional Development Value,” she explains what she did to win her executive’s decision and how Office Dynamics helped her become a better assistant and writer! Read “Professional Development Value” and follow her blog by clicking the link!

    https://successencourager.wordpress.com/

    The post Professional Development Value appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 18:28:14 on 2018/03/16 Permalink
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    Do You Have A Problem Saying No? 

    problem_saying_no

    What are your tips on the best way an assistant can overcome their problem saying no.

    “I have a real problem saying no at work. How do assert myself when I can’t take on any more?” This is one question I frequently here from administrative and executive assistants. I’m sure you many of you have encountered this, so I’d like your advice.

    “I have a problem saying ‘no’ to anyone. In the past, climbing up to the position I presently hold, it was an asset and it helped me to get noticed and promoted, but now I find it has labeled me as the go-to person. With all the duties I am expected to perform, I just can’t help everyone, yet I find myself doing it anyway. How do I decline without sounding difficult or rude?”

    Assistants all over the world have struggled with how to say ‘no’ at work.

    My question to my readers: How have you handled or would handle a similar situation?

    We encourage you to share in the comments below.

    Are you an assistant who doesn’t have any trouble saying no? What has that experience been like for you?

    Are you an assistant who has a problem saying no at work? Does that spill over outside of work? What are some of the biggest obstacles for you in saying no when you simply can’t or shouldn’t accommodate a person’s request of you?

    Do you simply being the ‘go-to’ person and yes is your favorite word? Let’s hear it! Please share below.

    Need more help in the area of asserting yourself? We’ve got your back. Check out my entire series of blogs and webinars that can help you build your assertiveness in the workplace.

    Do you think that saying no to someone means you are a terrible assistant? Check out our article: Qualities of a Great Assistant (spoiler – Yes Man/Woman isn’t on the list of qualities).

    Related: How Well Do You Communicate? A guest post by Judi Moreo

    Why Being A People-Pleaser Is Bad For Your Health

    The post Do You Have A Problem Saying No? appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 15:30:21 on 2018/03/14 Permalink
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    How to Maximize Time with Your Children 

    time_with_your_children

    Like most working mothers, I just never seemed to have enough time with my two children. Trying to balance work, with raising a family, keeping up with laundry, shopping, cleaning, cooking (the list is endless) was always a challenge.

    As with all working mothers, my biggest concern was for my children. I knew that the time with them had to be quality time well spent. I needed to maximize every moment we had together, just as I know you want to maximize your time with your children.

    Drive time seemed to be the best opportunity since it seemed that a lot of time we spent together was in the car. I decided not to let the kids play with their video games, I turned off my cell phone (NOTHING was more important than my children – whoever it was could wait), and any other distractions.

    One simple thing you can start doing to maximize time with your children.

    I had their full attention and they had mine (of course, I kept my eyes on the road)! So, we started playing quiz games. I would quiz them, they would quiz me. For fun, we kept score. “What is the capital of Florida? Who was the first president of the USA? Annapolis is the capital of what state? If I had $5 and bought a book for $3.75, how much change would I get back? Name five animals that are mammals.” It became so much fun for them (and for me) that they would race to the car so we could start playing our game.

    After school, they couldn’t wait to quiz me on information they had learned that day. I must say, some of their questions really stumped me! This was even instrumental in building their self-esteem. We did this on road trip vacations, as well.

    Amazingly, they grew to become excellent students, with a high level of self-confidence. (At the time of this post.) My son is now finishing his second year at Johns Hopkins Medical School and my daughter has her master’s degree from Northwestern University.

    This post was contributed by Office Dynamics Certified Trainer and Speaker, Kathy Tosoian.

    Working parents, we’d like to hear from you. This is just one idea but there are so many ways we can build stronger connections with our children and maximize our time together. What are some special things you do to maximize time with your children? Please share in the comments below.

    The post How to Maximize Time with Your Children appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:30:11 on 2018/02/26 Permalink
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    Fighting Office Dragons 

    Employee_ConflictI have been speaking about office dragons for years and how to professionally deal with the dragons. Dragons were huge, dominating, fictitious creatures. Medieval writers had vivid imaginations for big, scary things. For many people, work is like a dragon. It can be overwhelming and certainly dominates well over half of our waking hours. Sometimes the people we work with can be pretty “fiery” creatures to deal with, too.

    Please join me on Thursday, March 1, 2018 | 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. PT for my LIVE E-Course, Fighting Office Dragons. Reserve your spot now.

    There are many dragon species at work. Three of the most common perceived species are leaders, co-workers, and self. We are going to look at:

    1. The behaviors of each species that makes them appear to be like a dragon. Notice, I said the word appear.
    2. How to professionally deal with your dragons.

    Leaders can appear to be dragons when they:

    • do not communicate on the employee’s level
    • give poor direction
    • show favoritism
    • do not follow through on what they say
    • do not resolve conflicts

    Co-workers can appear to be dragons when they:

    • gossip
    • convey a bad mood at the office
    • do not perform their part of a job
    • are not a team player
    • do not share necessary information

    You can be a dragon to yourself when you:

    • do not focus on the job
    • let others damage your attitude
    • do not see your own potential
    • lack confidence
    • take criticism personally

    You can do more harm to yourself with negative thinking than any outside dragon. It is your thought process and attitude that controls your internal dragon. You have the power at any time to tame your dragon and put out the fire of any dragon-like qualities.

    Here are 5 strategies you can use with any of the dragons:

    1. Act … Don’t React. Reaction cycles never end. Only when you decide to think and act independently will you progress toward your goal. Reacting is responding to your immediate feeling. It puts you at the mercy of the dragon.
    2. Stop the Mind Reading! Face it, we all move so fast that we seldom take the initiative to clarify things with others. Instead, we ponder a scenario, rolling it over and over in our minds. We “determine” i.e., mind read, what that person was thinking/motivated by/perceiving, without simply asking them to clarify.
    3. Focus on Self-change vs. Changing Others. A good first step is communicating with the dragon. Informing someone and offering suggestions can sometimes be helpful because people don’t always see their negative attitude or behavior. In the final analysis, however, every adult does as he or she chooses. When you can’t change a situation or a person’s behavior, look at changing your view about this person. You can still control your attitude.
    4. Take Independent Steps Toward Your Goals. Determine what your goals are and write them down. List the one thing you can do toward achieving those goals each day. Doing this combines the winning strategies of independent action and self-change. Setting and achieving goals gives you a sense of accomplishment. This is a positive feeling. When you feel good about who you are and what you do, it naturally flows over to others.
    5. Make Friends. You spend more time with co-workers than you do with your family or friends. People at work must become allies instead of dragons. The work relationship requires respect, honesty, confidentiality, appreciation, communication, and energy.
    6. I personally have used all these strategies and know they work. I wish you the best in dragon fighting this week. The most important thing I want you to remember is that most of the time, the dragon is in our mind.

    Joan Burge

    Please join me on Thursday, March 1, 2018 | 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. PT for my LIVE E-Course, Fighting Office Dragons. Reserve your spot now.

    This post is part of Joan’s Monday Motivators, a weekly editorial designed to kick off your week with practical ways to create a new mindset, change behaviors, develop positive relationships and thrive in the workplace with energy, effectiveness, and excellence. Sign up HERE to follow Joan’s Monday Motivators.

    The post Fighting Office Dragons appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
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