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  • feedwordpress 09:00:15 on 2017/10/10 Permalink
    Tags: , Effective Leader, , , Personal Development   

    7 Fears You Need to Overcome to Be An Effective Leader 

    Everybody has fears—and that means every leader has fears. But not letting those fears
    get the best of you is an important part of successful leadership. If you don’t learn to
    manage your fears, you’ll be tempted to take the kind of shortcuts that undermine your authority and influence.

    Here are seven of the most common fears that leaders, in particular, need to look out for:

    The fear of being seen as an imposter. If you secretly feel you’re not really good enough
    or smart enough for leadership, you’re not alone. But left unchecked, those feelings can do harm to your effectiveness. Fear can make you forget everything and want to run. Instead, leverage your fear by experiencing it and being great anyway. As Mark Twain once said, courage is the resistance to fear, not the absence of fear. You can feel the fear and still
    be who you want to be as a leader.

    The fear of being criticized. Facing criticism is part of the territory of leadership.
    You don’t have to let it bother you—in fact, you should be concerned if you never hear
    criticism, because that means you’re probably playing too safe. Think of it this way: If
    you have no critics you’ll likely have no success. So don’t fear criticism but take it in
    stride and strive to be your own best and meet your own standard of excellence.
    On the other side of your fear is everything you need to be.

    The fear of being a failure. When you fail as a leader, you get everyone’s attention.
    Failure is something we all fear, but it doesn’t have to mean it’s fatal to your leadership—
    think of failure as simply part of succeeding. When you become afraid to fail forward,
    you end up missing out on new learning experiences and new opportunities. In the
    end we regret only the chances we didn’t take.

    The fear of not being a good communicator. Not everyone is born to be a great communicator, but good communication skills are essential to leadership. if you
    are fearful that you’re not good at communicating in a compelling way—in a way
    that inspires and motivates others—practice your speaking or writing skills. The
    more you practice and rehearse and revise, the more confident you will be and the
    less fearful you will become.

    The fear of making hard decisions. As a leader, you need to be able to make hard
    decisions without getting stuck in “paralysis of analysis”—taking too long to choose
    because of indecision. A lack of decisiveness can cripple any business or organization.
    Hard choices are sometimes necessary without much time to reflect. Make the best
    decision you can based on where you want to go, not where you are, and then move on.

    The fear of not taking responsibility. As the saying goes, with much power comes much responsibility. To take responsibility you have to first realize that your leadership is the
    cause of and the solution to the things that matter, and you can’t escape that responsibly
    by postponing or evading it. The moment you move past your fear and take responsibility
    is the moment you can change anything.

    The fear of not getting it done. In today’s global economy, effective leadership is
    defined by results—but, as we all know well, there are hundreds of distractions and
    millions of diversions that can get in the way. If you’re fearful you won’t get the job done,
    stop focusing on the results you want and concentrate on the actions you can take
    right now that will lead to those results.

    Lead from within: These are just a few of the possibilities. The leaders I coach have
    all kinds of fears. Whatever form your fears take, once you learn you can tackle them
    head-on you’ll quickly realize you can handle anything.


    Learn how to be an effective leader in my National Bestseller book:
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post 7 Fears You Need to Overcome to Be An Effective Leader appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:18 on 2017/09/26 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , New Leader, Personal Development,   

    How to Succeed as A New Leader 

    Congratulations on your new leadership position! I am sure you’ve worked hard and persevered along the way to get to this point.

    Everything you’ve done so far in your career has led you to this position. But the experiences and skills that landed you this new job will not be what allows you to succeed.

    In fact, you’ll need a new set of skills to continue being successful. You need to adapt the traits and develop the skills that make leaders into great leaders. There are no quick fixes; it takes hard work and the refusal to give up.

    As a leadership coach for over three decades, I have groomed some of the top leaders across all industries. I’ve learned there is no real secret to succeeding—it’s just a matter of learning the habits and skills you need.

    Here are some powerful things you can do. Use this as a blueprint and revisit it every few weeks to make sure your leadership is moving toward where it needs to be.

    Create with style. Identify your own leadership style and make it clear to everyone what you stand for, what’s important to you and what you will not tolerate. Allow others to get to know you—make it personal and inspirational.

    Create a template. To make an impact from the start, make sure you know what you will do. Conduct an organizational assessment after obtaining input from all sources, then create a template of the information you receive and make a plan.

    Avoid power trips. Now that you’ve earned your place as a leader, it’s easy to let the power get to you. But don’t. Rather than letting your ego get the best of you, treat your new position with respect and work humbly on being able to adapt, transform and do what is right.

    Understand the concept behind the company. As a new leader, you need to learn the lay of the land. Become familiar with all aspects of the company so you can see what is working and what is not.

    Communicate who you are. Let your colleagues and employees who you are and what you are all about. Let them get to know you so they can follow you. Those who don’t know what you stand for will find it hard to follow your lead.

    Trust your new team. When you became a leader, you inherited a team that you may not have even had a hand in selecting. They may not be the dream team you want, but don’t become discouraged. Give them a chance to align with you and start building trust.

    Generate your own vision. Craft your vision and use diversified communication vehicles, including email, memos, video conferences, and face-to-face meetings, to articulate it effectively. Let people know that you have great ideas and aspirations and you plan on making them happen.

    Identify your priorities. Show others what’s most important to you by identifying the priority areas to improve the bottom line. Create an action plan, dividing the areas into short- and long-term goals. Let people know you are here to get things done.

    Manage all stakeholders. Most leaders think they have no time for this, but it’s so important—you need to meet all stakeholders to hear firsthand their expectations and aspirations. Travel or use electronic conferencing to connect with those who are far away. Connecting with stakeholders is as important as any other task you will do.

    Listen more than you speak. Speak less, listen more—get input on the major changes that need to happen and then work to improve the organization’s effectiveness and bottom line.

    Communicate with candor. In every communication—public or private, with people at every level of the organization and outside—be open, transparent and forthcoming.

    Devise a new strategy. Don’t make the mistake of following the strategy of your predecessor. It may (or may not) have worked for them, but you were hired to bring your own ideas to bear.

    Create a winning formula. Create a winning formula based on your recreated vision and show how the organization can succeed with your plan. Seek early wins from the very beginning so you can build momentum.

    Identify roles and responsibilities. Make sure everyone is rightly placed with their roles and responsibilities to leverage their strengths. At times, good employees are wrongly placed in the organization. Spot and place them properly.

    Encourage creativity and innovation. Encourage innovative ideas among employees and reward them for their efforts.

    Provide feedback. You gain credibility when you give input to your employees regularly. Guide, coach and inspire them daily.

    Align and eliminate. After you have given them time to align and a chance to grow and develop, consider eliminating those who aren’t on board with your ideas. Sometimes part of making sure you have the right people on the bus is making sure the wrong people get off.

    Stay open to learning. Every great leader knows that to have a continuing impact and a great legacy you need to keep learning. Self-improvement is a lifelong journey, and success as a leader and as an individual requires constant learning. Treat your education as a process, not a race with an end point.

    Remember, it’s always about others. It’s not about your achievements, your goals, your ambitions or your success as a leader. Everything you’ve done and earned for yourself is now your goal for your team. It’s about recognizing their efforts and contributions, rewarding them for positive behavior and helping them succeed.

    Think of your legacy. Ask yourself how you want to be remembered at the end of your time with the organization. Then work backward, building upon your vision of your legacy daily.

    Lead from within: The new leader is one who commits people to action, who converts followers into leaders, and who may convert leaders into agents of change.


    Learn more about leadership in my National Bestseller book:
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post How to Succeed as A New Leader appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 11:06:55 on 2017/09/12 Permalink
    Tags: , Impacting Others, , , Making A Difference, Personal Development, Something to Offer, ,   

    Why Everyone Should See Themselves as A Leader 

    The other day I was talking with a friend about leadership and I was saying that everyone is a leader, and he replied with a question, “What about people who don’t think of themselves as a leader?”

    It was an interesting question- because for me- anyone who wants to make a difference and ends up making an impact with someone – somewhere.

    Is a leader.

    I’ve seen great leadership across the spectrum: in CEOs and entry-level employees, politicians and middle schoolers, clergy and people living on the street.

    Many people believe that leadership comes only with a formal role or position. But as a leadership coach, I believe we’re all leaders.

    Leadership doesn’t have to mean acquiring power or trying to change the world. It can be as simple as the daily acts we carry out living our lives—helping a neighbor, listening to a friend, standing up for a principle that’s important.

    The difference between being a leader or not is being the person who claims it. Here are four ways you can begin claiming your own leadership tod

    Believe you have something to offer. Leadership starts with how you see yourself—in particular, with the belief that you have something to offer to the world. That doesn’t mean you have to take on trying to change the world, but it means that as an individual you know you have something to offer, that you can reach other individuals and have a positive influence.

    Dedicate yourself to making a difference. You have been given a life unlike any other. No one else is who you are, and your life will never be lived by anyone else, but the significance and direction of that life are largely up to you.  Whether you’re young or old, you can make a difference for the good. Speaking a kind word, volunteering time, fundraising or donating for nonprofit organizations supporting things you feel strongly about—the ways to make a difference are limitless. Remember that each of us was born with a purpose.

    Be sensitive to issues impacting others. If you aren’t already tuned in to your own sensitivity to others, the natural empathy we all have within us, start listening—not just superficially, but in a way that takes in people’s circumstances and state of being. Anyone can be a powerful leader if they’re prepared to hear and understand the emotions, fears, and hopes that underlie the words and actions of other people. When you do, you create the connections that are at the heart of great leadership.

    Make the move. At the end of the day, only action produces results. Building relationships, developing others and making decisions are all important, but it is the actions that you take that will build your reputation as a great leader. Successful leaders have the courage to take action while other hesitate. Don’t just notice, don’t just discuss: get up and do something. If your actions inspire others to do the same—to dream more, learn more, and above all do more—you are a leader.

    Lead from within: You are a leader if you make others better as a result of your presence. And when you do, you’ll continue to influence them long after you are gone.

     


    Learn more about leadership in my National Bestseller book:
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     



    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post Why Everyone Should See Themselves as A Leader appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 11:54:49 on 2017/08/29 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Personal Development,   

    How to Best Navigate When It Comes to Leadership 

    We’ve suffered far too much bad leadership in recent years. Many who call themselves leaders and hold leadership positions have conducted themselves like people who can’t find their own way, let alone lead others.

    That’s why we are looking for a kind of leader—one we can respect, one we trust and want to follow.

    The kind of leadership we’re looking for, like all great leadership, is grounded in character. But how do leaders use that character to navigate through situations and circumstances?

    They follow their North Star.

    Just as it did for long-ago navigators, the North Star guides them through rough terrain and dark nights. The leader who knows their North Star knows where they are going, how they will get there and what they need along the way.

    To find your North Star, start here:

     Identify your moral inner compass. Your values are the chief guide of your leadership—the moral compass that will help you keep steering toward the things that matter. Without it, it’s easy to drift off course, but when you are centered in your moral inner compass you can translate pressure into success and success into meaning.

    Understand that you may wander off the path. Sometimes leaders get pulled off course into thinking that power is more important than people or that profit is more important than mission. This kind of thinking is a sure indicator that they’re losing their way—probably as a result of fear or insecurity. If you begin to feel lost, don’t despair but lock back onto your North Star and find your way back.

     Know your whole self. As a leader and a person, you need to know not only your sweet spots and strengths but also your blind spots and weaknesses. Own all of who you are. Once you’ve accepted your flaws, no one can use them against you.

    Stay grounded by acting on character. Character is the heart of every valid leadership navigation system. To lack character is to lack the capacity to lead, and capacity without character is dangerous. Your character is defined by your own moral and mental attitude. What makes you feel connected to your true self? When you know who you are, people can trust you.

    Act like a good follower to be a great leader. Many people think that being a leader means constantly fixing, supporting and coaching, but the true essence of a great leader lies in stepping back and listening, understanding, learning. You cannot be a leader and ask other people to follow you unless you know how to follow too. As a follower and a leader, be strong and kind, bold and proud.

    Lead from within: It’s in learning how to navigate that you will find your own North Star to help you, guide you, support you and teach you what it means to be a great leader.

     


    Learn more about your leadership in my National Bestseller book:
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     



    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post How to Best Navigate When It Comes to Leadership appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 11:04:39 on 2017/08/08 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Optimism, Personal Development, Positivity, , ,   

    The One Time You Should NOT Express Positivity 

    Optimism and positivity are beneficial to leadership in almost every circumstance. You won’t find many who would dispute that thought.

    We know the best kind of leadership requires seeing the glass as half full. We know that even in the most challenging times and difficult circumstances, it’s important to concentrate on what we have rather than what we lack. We understand the importance of gratitude—not just as a response when things are going especially well but as a daily practice. It’s not that happy people are thankful, it’s that thankful people are happy.

    We know positive thinking and an optimistic attitude can actually change our reality for the better. In the words of the old adage, “Think good, and it will be good.”

    A daily practice of gratitude and positivity can benefit you even when things get so bad that you can’t see a good outcome or any seed of hope. You can assure yourself that even if you can’t currently comprehend it, there’s a lesson or a stubborn thread of grace in there somewhere.

    There’s one situation, however, when positivity and gratitude don’t work—when, in fact, they can actually be destructive.

    That’s when you try to apply them to others.

    It’s understandable, the urge to apply something so helpful to someone who’s hurting. But however well intended, it simply doesn’t work.

    A distraught or grieving colleague or client doesn’t want to hear “There must be something good in your life to be grateful for.” Or “It must have been meant to be.” Or “I know you’re disappointed but things work out for the best.”

    When someone is suffering, it’s cruel to suggest that it’s all a lesson designed to make them a better person. And it’s downright arrogant for us to tell them this is good for them, or that it’s the way it’s meant to be.

    Our job is not to philosophize about another’s pain, but to alleviate, relieve and lessen it.

    True leaders know that when they see someone suffering, there’s only one acceptable response. They roll up their sleeves and ask, ‘What can I do to help?

    Here are some ways you can be of service to someone who’s hurting:

    Listen. One of the most important traits in leadership is the ability to listen. The best leaders, the skillful ones, know the importance of listening more than they speak. It’s especially important to listen to people who are trying to make sense of difficult events.

    Show support. If someone’s going through a tough time, the most meaningful thing you can say is I’m here for you. Simple words, but when they’re backed up with action they share a burden—and they reassure the person that they’re not alone.

    Convey empathy. Adopting a human approach to your leadership sets an example that helps you build an entire culture of empathetic leaders. People will admire your approach and work harder for you knowing that you respect their personal needs.

    Connect with caring. Gone are the days when people expect leaders to sit behind a closed office door and dictate from power. The best leaders today get to know their people on a personal level as well as professionally. They care, and they show that caring by connecting, communicating and demonstrating compassion.

     Lead from within: A positive is not the best answer for every situation. As a leader, you need to let each situation involving one of your people bring forth the best of what you have to offer in the terms of how you listen, how you support, how you care and how you connect.


    Learn more about the gaps that exist in positivity in my National Bestseller book:
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     



    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post The One Time You Should NOT Express Positivity appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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