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  • feedwordpress 17:38:01 on 2017/10/06 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Organizational Skills,   

    How to Improve Your Presentation Skills 

    How_to_Improve_Your_Presentation_SkillsAs you climb the corporate ladder, delivering a business presentation becomes one of the most important skills that you need to learn. A business presentation has to be informative, engaging, influencing, and entertaining at the same time. If one of these four key objectives are not covered well, the effectiveness of the presentation falls down immediately.
    It is a well-established fact that planning and preparation are the two steps that cannot be compromised, and are often not overlooked but most newbie presenters fail at the delivery step. Having a dull opening with a nervous demeanor might throw your audience into an irrecoverable state of disinterest. Showing that you are passionate about the topic and delivering the presentation with full-confidence is quite important.
    Usage of visuals can help expand horizons of your presentation for far better outcomes. If you open your presentation with a jaw-dropping statistics, the chances for your audience to pay attention to the rest of content go up, drastically. The audience tends to remember these figures for a long time and your views also find better acceptance.
    Check out this infographic from Malcolm Andrews to learn how to deliver a presentation effectively and improve your presentation skills. Also, check out various things that you should adopt on and also many others that you need to avoid while delivering a presentation.
    How_to_Deliver_a_World_Class_Presentation

    The post How to Improve Your Presentation Skills appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 17:41:42 on 2017/07/21 Permalink
    Tags: Organizational Skills,   

    Downsize and Organize Your Digital Clutter 

    Admin_TrainingPhysical clutter can damage your health. In a study done by the University of California Los Angeles, women who described their houses as cluttered, disorganized, disordered, or haphazard had daily patterns of the stress hormone cortisol that are normally associated with post-traumatic stress disorder, chronic fatigue, and early mortality. These women were also more likely to feel depressed.

    If you’ve ever spent a morning trying to track down a lost file on your hard drive or searching through a decade of email, you know that digital disorder can also take a toll on your wellbeing. Most people handle a constant flow of text messages, emails, photos, videos, and other digital information. When all that digital data piles up, it can slow you and your devices down. Keep reading for a step-by-step guide to downsizing and organizing your digital clutter.

    Get organized

    Does your documents folder or email inbox resemble a junk drawer with everything tossed in together? Do you usually rely on your search box to help you find files? An organization structure can help you declutter, share, synchronize, move, and easily track down files. Follow these simple steps to get your digital life organized:

    Designate Categories

    Browse through your files and emails and determine the major and minor categories they fall into. For instance, you may be able to divide photos into “work photos,” “family photos, “head shots,” etc. Within those categories, you may have subcategories.

    Make Folders

    Once you’ve determined what categories and subcategories you want to use for each type of file, make folders or subfolders for them.

    Develop Naming Guidelines

    Librarians who manage large digital collections use consistent, meaningful, and descriptive names to identify what’s inside each file. Follow suit, and you’ll be amazed at how much easier it is to track down specific files and photos when you need them. For documents, designate a naming structure such as “descriptive keywords-type of document.” For example, this article might be named “digital-decluttering-article.” For images, create a structure such as “descriptive keywords-month-year.” For example, vacation photos might be named “Hawaii-vacation-March-2017). For emails, use descriptive subject headings.

    Automate Email Organization

    Email inboxes can become unmanageable quickly. Depending on your email provider, you can automatically filter incoming emails into certain folders. For instance, all newsletters can be sent to a “newsletters” folder, and emails from colleagues can automatically be sent to a “work” folder.

    Declutter Your Digital Past

    Depending on how long it’s been since you’ve sorted through your digital data, you may need to do a major purge to get back on track. As with any big organizational project, the hardest part can be getting started. Set aside plenty of time, and commit to going through everything saved on your computer, mobile devices, external hard drive, or in the cloud, including photos, files, and personal records.

    How Long to Keep Digital Files - Downsize and Organize Your Digital Clutter

    Decluttering can be an emotional process. Set a relaxing tone by listening to music and treating yourself to your favorite beverage. Repeat the decluttering motto: “If in doubt, throw it out,” and begin sorting files into folders. If you find yourself deliberating for more than a minute about keeping any item, create a “maybe” folder, and put it there.

    Most of us accumulate a lot of photos and videos, because it’s so inexpensive and easy to snap and upload them these days. Photos and videos can hold a lot of sentimental value and can be difficult to downsize. However, it’s worth it! Not only are these files large and expensive to store; you don’t want to have to scroll through hundreds of files to find the photos that are meaningful to you.

    Start by purging the following:

    • Blurry photos
    • Duplicates
    • Extremely similar photos
    • Photos with poor lighting
    • Poor quality videos
    • Photos or videos that no longer hold sentimental value
    • Photos or videos that are no longer meaningful to you

    Back up Important Files

    Once you’ve purged and organized, you’ll be left with only those files that are important and meaningful to you. Ensure that they’re safe! Computer hard drives don’t last forever and are susceptible to mechanical defects, virus and malware attacks, accidents, and other threats. Most experts recommend saving important data in three locations. For instance, you could save one copy on your computer’s hard drive, one in a cloud service, and one on an external hard drive.

    Digital Decluttering Schedule - Downsize and Organize Your Digital Clutter

    Make a Plan

    Digital clutter builds up quickly. Get out your calendar, and schedule regular recurring dates with yourself to keep your data in order.

    Keeping Data Safe Long-Term - Downsize and Organize Your Digital Clutter

    Destination Peace of Mind

    Decluttering, organizing, and securing your digital data can be a big task, especially if you haven’t dealt with it for a while. However, your efforts will pay off. You’ll not only keep your computer and devices running well; you’ll likely enjoy greater productivity and peace of mind.

    http://repettilab.psych.ucla.edu/no%20place%20like%20home.pdf

    http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/15677/zen-and-the-art-of-file-and-folder-organization/

    http://ucblibraries.colorado.edu/systems/digitalinitiatives/docs/filenameguidelines.pdf

    https://support.google.com/mail/answer/6579?hl=en

    How long do hard drives actually live for?

    Author: Abby Quellen

    Original Source: eReplacementParts Blog

    Downsize and Organize Your Digital Clutter

    The post Downsize and Organize Your Digital Clutter appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:51:50 on 2017/07/10 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Organizational Skills, , , ,   

    Build Structure out of Chaos (Part 4 of 4 Part Series) 

    administrative_assistant_trainingTo end my 4 part series, I wanted to share my quick list of tips with you. In case you missed the rest of the series, you can read part 1 here, part 2 here and part 3 here. Remember that doing several little things throughout your day can also improve your productivity. You can pick and choose which ones you would like to try. Best of luck.

     

    1. Standardize processes.

    2. Focus on tasks of high value.

    3. Clarify objectives.

    4. Learn to think on paper.

    5. Anticipate upcoming work events or projects.

    6. Avoid backlogs of work by keeping information flowing.

    7. Flexibility leads to control. Use your “to do” list or other tools, but don’t let them control you.

    8. When given a project or task, get all the information you can at once.

    9. Excuse yourself from idle chatter after a few minutes.

    10.When involved in discussions, stick to the issue at hand.

    11.Finish what you start; avoid jumping around (multitasking).

    12.Keep an organized workspace.

     

    I hope you enjoyed this 4 part Series.

    The post Build Structure out of Chaos (Part 4 of 4 Part Series) appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 13:30:07 on 2017/07/10 Permalink
    Tags: , , Organizational Skills, , , ,   

    Build Structure out of Chaos (Part 4 of 4 Part Series) 

    training_for_executive_assistants

    To end my 4 part series, I wanted to share my quick list of tips with you. In case you missed the rest of the series, you can read part 1 here, part 2 here and part 3 here. Remember that doing several little things throughout your day can also improve your productivity. You can pick and choose which ones you would like to try. Best of luck.

    1. Standardize processes.
    2. Focus on tasks of high value.
    3. Clarify objectives.
    4. Learn to think on paper.
    5. Anticipate upcoming work events or projects.
    6. Avoid backlogs of work by keeping information flowing.
    7. Flexibility leads to control. Use your “to do” list or other tools, but don’t let them control you.
    8. When given a project or task, get all the information you can at once.
    9. Excuse yourself from idle chatter after a few minutes.
    10. When involved in discussions, stick to the issue at hand.
    11. Finish what you start; avoid jumping around (multitasking).
    12. Keep an organized workspace.

    I hope you enjoyed this 4 part Series. I hope you continue to enjoy your summer.

    Joan Burge

    This blog was created from our Monday Motivators series. Monday Motivators is a weekly note offering practical ways to create a new mindset, change behaviors, develop positive relationships and thrive in the workplace with energy, effectiveness, and excellence.

    admin_training

    The post Build Structure out of Chaos (Part 4 of 4 Part Series) appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 13:30:23 on 2017/06/26 Permalink
    Tags: , , Organizational Skills, , , ,   

    Reducing Information Overload (Part 3 of 4 Part Series) 

    training_for_assistants

    To continue my series on better managing your day and work, today I am focusing on information overload. I’m sure you can relate. If you missed the prior parts of this series, you can read part 1 here and part 2 here.

    There’s just too much information out there! In fact, information processing accounts for half the gross national product—and most of it ends up on paper that someone has to read. You don’t have to fall prey to information overload. You just have to be more selective about the information you choose to take in. Here are five steps to becoming a picky information consumer.

    Step 1: Don’t read everything that comes to you. You simply can’t absorb everything you think you need to know. Once you admit that, you’ll be better able to prioritize, delegate or ignore the information that comes your way.

    Step 2: Assess your information sources. Take some time to decide which action, Web site, report or professional association information that isn’t of the highest quality.

    Step 3: Scan for information. When you open a publication, look through the table of contents first. Scan for topics and article summaries. Choose only articles or reports that you need to read. Don’t waste your time on information just because it’s mildly interesting to you. Stick to what’s important.

    Step 4: Use your highlighter. Once you commit to reading an article, underline any information you want to refer to later. Throw out any article or report where you haven’t highlighted any passages.

    Step 5:  Be an example. If you don’t want to get bogged down by long e-mails or voice messages, keep your own short. Let others know that they should keep their information as concise as possible—and mention it to them nicely when they don’t.

    Wishing you great success applying these steps this week!

    Joan Burge

    This blog was created from our Monday Motivators series. Monday Motivators is a weekly note offering practical ways to create a new mindset, change behaviors, develop positive relationships and thrive in the workplace with energy, effectiveness, and excellence.

    admin_training

    The post Reducing Information Overload (Part 3 of 4 Part Series) appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
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