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  • feedwordpress 15:45:54 on 2018/11/13 Permalink
    Tags: , Networking,   

    High Fives at an Administrative Assistant Conference 

     

    An administrative assistant conference is best measured by the feeling one has while clapping at the end of the last presentation. You know you have learned and grown from the content when a flood of gratitude flows out of clapping hands.

    The Office Dynamics Conference

    This year’s Office Dynamics’ Stellar Assistant Conference provided professional topics and presenters such as Judi Moreo, Susan Shultz, Debbie Gross and Joan Burge herself, among others, it also included Lisa Olsen who shared her fun emcee skills and passion for the profession. There were lots of questions and answers during the Star-Studded panel; these women shared their passion for our profession.

    With such a broad range of presenter styles, there was truly something for everyone. The learning and growth opportunities expanded beyond the topics though. Joan’s gratitude and professionalism encouraged many to speak up during team exercises and to introduce themselves to her during breaks to show their own gratitude. We were all encouraged to reach outside our comfort zones and connect. Many took advantage of that and it was so worth it!

    Joan shared her knowledge and work experiences ranging from what she truly enjoyed to taking jobs she was not so excited about, yet made into learning experiences, allowing attendees to find even more ways to relate to her. Her experiences helped attendees bond by sharing their own stories and knowledge.

    The Networking Opportunities

    The networking opportunities and team exercises provided friendship and professional connections I truly did not expect, but I am beyond grateful for. The two and a half days spent with women from all around the world provided interactions with a true role-model peer group. Because of such an encouraging environment and well-planned networking activities, we now have the ability to implement what we learned by staying connected with those new friends and sharing even more conversations about our lives and workplace celebratory and challenging moments.

    The women that I had the privilege of sitting with at table 32, were supportive and each so very unique yet with the common bond of our profession and dedication. We bonded through relating to the content, discussing our own challenges and encouraging one another. I could not possibly put a count on the high fives and hugs shared. These women created a true support circle and over that short 2 ½ day time period they taught me by sharing each of their distinctive work and life experiences.

    They reminded me of the importance of supportive collaboration and mutual professional respect while having fun and sharing laughs and those amazing high fives. The team at table 32 and several other women I had the honor to meet and share amazing conversations with had me thinking about the profession more, sharing from my own experience, learning from their experiences, feeling completely comfortable being exactly who I am while providing countless moments of laughter and smiles.

    High Fives All Around

    With much gratitude and respect, I thank each woman I shared a high five with, a hug, a laugh, a conversation and built memories with. I also extend that gratitude to Joan and her entire team. The conversations I shared with Joan, Ernan, Brian, and Melia encouraged me to experience the entire conference not only by what I learned and the takeaways but also by making connections, reaching out and talking to others, listening and taking advantage of any moment that connected me with another attendee.

    Being introduced as a guest blogger for Office Dynamics opened up even more opportunity and discussion. I appreciate each attendee that reached out to me to discuss conference topics and asked my opinion about their current work situation. Thank you for starting those conversations that were a pure joy to share with you!

    A well-balanced professional development opportunity should provide relevant content, unique ways of sharing that content, presenters with encouraging and professional stories, respect for the profession, inspire the desire to learn and create an experience that attendees from all backgrounds and work experience levels can relate to while encouraging each to bond and network. The Stellar Assistant Conference DELIVERED!

    Personal and Professional Growth

    The Office Dynamics Team provided a platform for administrative professionals who were eager to expand their learning, share their experiences and willingness to connect with one another the perfect gathering place to do just that and so much more.

    I have already received several texts and emails from the amazing women I now call friends. My well-being would not be quite as gratified as it is now, without having met these Stellar women. Our profession would not be as rewarding if Joan was not so dedicated to providing such a place for all of us. Not having the opportunity to attend this professional development conference would have been a missed opportunity for personal and professional growth.

     

     

    Dana Buchanan is a 20 plus year professional assistant with a passion for writing and offers a unique and professional perspective to projects and brainstorming sessions! She enjoys helping others discover key steps toward their career focus, job search, or self-employment exploration by creating or editing resumes, researching a particular type of job search, discovering business ideas and the action needed to succeed and loves sharing interviewing tips! Dana is also available to speak to small groups.

    You can read and follow Dana’s blogs at Success Encourager.

    The post High Fives at an Administrative Assistant Conference appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 03:40:47 on 2018/06/16 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Networking, ,   

    The 5 Biggest Networking Mistakes People Make 

     

    Becoming an effective networker takes time and effort. It requires you do your homework and step out of your comfort zone–and many of us, even experienced executives, still have a hard time doing it well. As a business coach, I often remind people of the importance of networking. It’s definitely worth the time and effort. But what if you’re out there doing your best and it’s still not working well for you? You could be making one of these five common networking mistakes.

    1. Calling it in.

    At its best, networking is done face to face. In an age when technology allows us to do nearly everything online, we need to remember there’s no substitute for getting out there and introducing yourself to someone in person. When you meet people, you get a better read on who they really are. Even if you feel you won’t be good at networking events, challenge yourself to get out there. Even if you talk to only one or two people, try to find common ground. However awkward you feel at first, with practice you’ll soon become much more at ease.

    2. Treating networking as a one-way street.

    People may be connecting with you because they’re genuinely interested in your ideas, but they’re also there because they want you to listen to what they have to say. So don’t hog the conversation. Networking is about building mutual relationships, and there’s no room for one-sided domination. Meet someone, get to know them, and let them learn to trust you and like you. That’s what networking is all about.

    3. Taking before you give.

    It’s tempting to think of networking as a chance to make a pitch: I’ll find five people in the room and tell them what I need, and then I’ll get it. But networking is built on give-and-take, and give always comes first. Start by noting who you’d like to meet. Then do some research if necessary and think of ways you can support and help them. Work on developing a relationship. When you do, you position yourself among successful people whose influence can help you go far. Build a reputation for being helpful in your network, and people will be keen to help you in turn. Answer when people ask for help, then go further to discover what they need and provide it proactively.

    4. Focusing on quantity over quality.

    Too many people treat networking as a numbers game, collecting contact information without getting to know anyone. This is a mistake I see over and over again. People act as if there were a prize for the one who collects the most cards or connections. But the real prize goes to the person who’s able to make the most genuine connection, engage in the most relevant conversations, and create a memorable impression.

    5. Failing to follow up.

    This is the biggest and most common mistake of all: You go to an event and make some great connections, but you let them fade away without acting on them. Following up is the key to networking; without it, attending events and fostering connections is a waste of time. Create a specific plan for following up, and do your part to steer promising new relationships toward mutually beneficial territory. Failing to follow up means a missed opportunity to develop a potentially meaningful and profitable connection.

    Done right, networking is about building relationships and connecting. It should always be about giving before you receive and learning before you speak.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post The 5 Biggest Networking Mistakes People Make appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 18:00:32 on 2018/06/13 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Networking, ,   

    Office Dynamics Update: Sponsorship Now Available! 


    Sponsorship_Opportunities

    Let Office Dynamics Connect You To the REAL Decision-Makers, Gatekeepers, and Influencers From Organizations Around the World.

    Administrative Professionals are deeply attuned to the needs of their business and have the unique ability to research, recommend, and instantly buy products and services that address their pain points.

    Our audience works for globally recognized organizations including Cisco Systems, The Boeing Company, Humana Inc., Procter & Gamble, Nationwide Insurance, Kindred Healthcare, and other Fortune 500 companies.

    Our sponsors receive the coveted “Office Dynamics Seal of Approval,” which means you and your product or service will immediately gain global recognition within this powerful group. Joan’s direct endorsement carries a message of value, quality, and practicality. Joan knows her audience and they trust her.

     


     

    Interested In Being A Sponsor?

    Call 800-STAR-139

     

     

     

     

    The post Office Dynamics Update: Sponsorship Now Available! appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 22:26:37 on 2018/06/10 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Networking, ,   

    Perfect Icebreakers: 8 Smart Phrases That Will Make You Better at Networking 


    Networking events are a great opportunity to make valuable contacts, professionally and personally. But many people stress over the pressure of trying to connect quickly and impressively with complete strangers. Some even stay away because they can’t get comfortable with the idea.

    It’s definitely a situation that can prey on any insecurities you have, but if you prepare well, you can know that you won’t be caught in a long weird silence or trying to think of something to say that doesn’t sound awkward. Then you’ll be ready not just for networking events but for company picnics, conferences, cocktail parties, and any other social events that take you outside your circle of family and friends.

    Here are eight perfect icebreakers to learn and practice.

    1. Hi, my name is . . .

    Start with the basics. Put out your hand, flash a genuine smile, make eye contact, and introduce yourself. From there the person you’re talking with will almost certainly share their name, and you’re already off to a good start.

    2. What do you do?

    People love to talk about themselves. If you’re inquisitive and curious, most people will pick it up from there and carry the talking. Again, it’s a question of starting with the basics.

    3. What business are you in?

    A slightly different version of “What do you do?” Either can be appropriate, depending on the event and the person. You may even want to use both. If you learn that you’re talking with an accountant, you can ask, “Are you with an accounting firm, or do you work for a business in a different industry?”

    4. What do you like about your job?

    Open-ended questions like this are a great follow-up, because they probably can’t be answered in a couple of words. It reinforces positivity and communicates interest in their work.

    5. How did you get started in this kind of work?

    You can learn so much about someone if you hear even a bit about their journey instead of focusing exclusively on the here and now. And when people start telling their story, things can really get interesting.

    6. What are you hoping to get out of this event?

    Obviously this isn’t a question to ask at, say, a birthday party for a board member, but if the focus is professional, it’s worth a try. It gives the other person a chance to communicate something about themselves indirectly–is their answer funny, sarcastic, sincere, dismissive?

    7. I love your work.

    If you’re talking with someone well-known, expressing admiration for their work can be a good starting place. From there, you can pivot into something more open-ended, like “I heard you speak about your new project at last year’s conference–how is that going?” or “One of the ideas in your book really helped me through a rough patch . . . ”

    8. What advice would you give someone just starting out in your industry?

    With an industry veteran or older person, an open-ended hypothetical like this can lead you to valuable insights. You may also want to ask how the industry has changed during the course of their career.

    The bottom line is this: Be interested in learning more about others, and you’ll always have something to ask. Be willing to engage in give and take and give something of yourself as well, and you’ll soon wonder what it is you were so intimidated by.

     

     


    N A T I O N A L    B E S T S E L L E R

    THE LEADERSHIP GAP

    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post Perfect Icebreakers: 8 Smart Phrases That Will Make You Better at Networking appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 22:23:13 on 2018/06/10 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Networking, ,   

    11 Smart Phrases to Use at Networking Events 

    Unless you’re naturally gregarious, meeting new people is a challenge–and a networking event, which is all about meeting new people–can be downright grueling. You want to sound intelligent but you don’t know what to say, and you dread the thought of a long awkward silence or a statement that falls flat.

    But if you can get people started talking about themselves, you’re off to the races–and they come away thinking you’re an excellent conversationalist.

    Here are 11 smart things to say at your next networking event:

    “What’s your name?”
    A polite introduction is important, and you do best by keeping it simple. Walk up, hold out your hand, and introduce yourself.

    “What do you do?”
    Remember, people enjoy talking to people who are interested in them, and they enjoy talking about themselves. When you ask a question, don’t let your attention wander. Stay focused and curious, because you’re most interesting when you’re interested.

    “I can’t believe we both . . . “
    If possible, try to find some common ground, an interest or professional affiliation you share. (This may be easier at a conference based on your profession or geographic setting than at a more general event.)

    “Can I ask you more about . . . ?”
    Work to have an open mind and be genuinely curious. If you’re standing with a group of people, don’t zone out but think of a question can ask to help the conversation progress.

    “I really like . . . “
    Give compliments, but only if you mean it. if you feel uncomfortable keep it generic. You can almost always find something good to say about the food or the setting, if you feel you have nothing to compliment the person about.

    “I recently read that . . . “

    At most networking events, there are multiple conversations going on at once. Make a point of listening and thinking about how you can contribute something of genuine interest.

    “What do you think about. . . . “
    If you’re surrounded by people who are experts in interesting field, remember that people love sharing opinions.

    “It’s funny to me . . .”
    A sense of humor is a great way to connect. Many people at networking events are nervous. As long as it’s appropriate and well-timed, a joke will put people at ease and make you memorable.

    “Did you see the game last night?”
    Sports is a winning topic that connects people and lets you talk about events without the risks of discussing politics.
    “Can we exchange contact info to schedule a time for us to finish our conversation?”
    When you meet someone who seems like a valuable contact, make sure you exchange information before you part.

    “We recently met at . . . and I wanted to follow up with . . .”
    Make sure you do follow up, in a timely and appropriate way. Email or text

    Even beyond networking, building good conversational skills is one of the best things you can do for your career and your personal life. Even if you rely on memorized starter phrases at first, get over your self-consciousness and jump in!

     


    N A T I O N A L    B E S T S E L L E R

    THE LEADERSHIP GAP

    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post 11 Smart Phrases to Use at Networking Events appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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