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  • feedwordpress 08:00:16 on 2019/09/05 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Micromanager, , , ,   

    10 Phrases That Will Help You Handle a Micromanaging Boss  


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    If your boss is a micromanager—the kind who wants to maintain as much control over you as they can—you know how frustrating and irritating it is. It’s possible, though, to take back some control—and these phrases can help you make that happen. Use them to start an effective dialogue that can result in more autonomy and less micromanagement:

    I’m going to do everything in my power to make you look good. If you tell your boss you want to make them look good, there is no reason for them to hound you. Accustomed to resistance, most micromanagers will be glad to hear something positive.

    Your success is important to me. Feed the ego of your micromanager and let them know their success matters to you. Their controlling tendencies are likely to ease if they believe your mind is on them—as they want it to be.

    Tell me how you like the work to be done. You may be able to circumvent a hovering micromanager by getting all the information up front. It will help you do the job you are supposed to do while also meeting their expectations.

    I will do an excellent job for you. When you reassure a micromanager about the quality of your work and show them that excellence is important to you, you may be able to put their perfectionist mind at peace.

    I know you want to help me succeed. Disarming a micromanager is important, and labeling their negative action into something positive may have them agreeing with you. Thank them and let them know you appreciate their investment. The recognition will make them feel good about themselves and it may help them give you some peace.

    I value your guidance. This is another way of disarming the micromanager with a positive twist. If you acknowledge their counsel, you may be able to persuade them that you will come to them when you need them.

    You sometimes know things about the situation that I don’t. This phrase feeds the micromanager’s ego and lets them know that you acknowledge their higher position and that you’ll check in when you need to know more.

    All the hovering, adjustments and changes are affecting my productivity. If nothing else is getting through, tell the truth and be straightforward. Leaders are measured by how much their team achieves. They know that productivity issues reflect poorly on them.

    I am going to show you how I do it on my own. Give the micromanager a rest by walking them through your own processes, showing them your competence and care.

    I am always open to your feedback. Holding yourself open for your micromanager to teach, guide, and mentor can help keep your work relationship on the plane where it belongs.

    A leader who’s constantly looking over their employees’ shoulders can inspire a lot of second-guessing and paranoia, and ultimately ends up running away their most talented people. To stop the micromanager—or at least get them out of your hair—try each of these approaches in turn until the situation is under control.

    Lead From Within: Most people don’t take well to being micromanaged because it leads to a loss of control and autonomy. But there are steps you can take before you decide to leave.


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 10 Phrases That Will Help You Handle a Micromanaging Boss  appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:38 on 2019/07/25 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Micromanager, ,   

    How to Survive a Micromanaging Leader 


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    To work under a leader who is a micromanager can be very difficult. I have found that the only way to survive a micromanaging leader is to understand why they do what they do.

    Here are some of the most common reasons leaders resort to micromanaging—and what you can do to alleviate the pressure:

    Power. Unfortunately, this is probably the most common reason for micromanagement. Some leaders relish the idea of holding on to power. To maintain their sense of authority, they use their position to lead from commands rather than leading from empowerment. If this is true, let your leader know you know who is in charge and you find their wisdom valuable. Reassure them that you’ll come to them immediately if you need assistance.

    Control. A related trait in many leaders is wanting to always be in control of everything—not just the big picture but every detail. Sadly, this means everything you do, even the smallest task, falls under their micromanagement. To survive a control freak, make sure you always keep them in the loop so they are aware of everything that is going on.

    Insecurity. No confident leader would think of telling you what to do and how to do it. But insecure leaders get stuck in the weeds. When this happens, the best approach is to feed their ego a bit. Let know them in detail what you’re doing and how. Over time, their confidence in your ability may grow.

    Anxiety. An anxious leader is a chaotic leader. Everything is urgent and a source of fretfulness and worry. Being anxious makes them constantly apprehensive. This kind of leader needs to be calmed down and placated. Ask in advance how they like things done and then make sure you’re giving them what they need .

    Fear. Fear comes in all shapes and sizes, and fearful leaders can be the worst micromanagers. They’re afraid that people will do things wrong, and even when things go right they’re afraid someone else will get the credit. They try to keep their hands on every situation and circumstance because they are fearful for themselves. This kind of leader is often the hardest to deal with, because everything alarms them. But the more you can address their fears, the less threatening they will find you.

    Distrust. When a leader doesn’t trust you, they’re more likely to micromanage you in ways that make you uncomfortable. Try to remember that their distrust says more about them than about you. In practical terms, it means you have to work especially hard to earn, and keep, your leader’s trust.

    The most important thing when you’re dealing with a micromanager is not to give up hope. If you’re aware of the problem and understand why it is happening, you’re already taken the first steps toward making the situation better.

    Lead from within: Micromanagers tell people what to do; great leaders ask what they’re doing and then do everything they can to support without crossing the line.

     


     

    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

     

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Big Stock Photos/cartoons

    The post How to Survive a Micromanaging Leader appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 18:36:13 on 2018/06/10 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Micromanager, ,   

    17 Signs You’re Actually a Micromanager 


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    If you’ve ever worked for a micromanager, you know how awful and how it can be. Working with a leader, on the other hand, can be an inspiring and educational experience.

    Micromanagers have a hard time trusting others to make decisions and rarely allow others to act independently, while true leaders are all about trust and autonomy.

    Nobody likes to think of themselves as a micromanager, but if you have any question, ask yourself these questions:

    1. Do you work weekends and long hours and rarely take vacation? This is often a sign of the inability or unwillingness to delegate or lose control. Micromanagers need to be constantly present, while leaders understand the need to integrate their professional and personal lives.

    2. Does everything need your approval? Micromanagers don’t want anything going in or out without their approval. Leaders trust their people to do what they do best and empower them to take action.

    3. Do you have a hard time delegating? Micromanagers spend more time telling how to do the task than describing whatneeds to be accomplished. Leaders practice effective delegation, with guidance only when it’s needed.

    4. Do you think you’re the only one who can do it right? The mantra of the micromanager is “If you want something done right, you have to do it yourself.” They grab the work back at the first sign of trouble, or even redo what’s already been done. Leaders give people opportunities to show what they can do, then express appreciation for the effort.

    5. Do you have to be involved in every decision? Micromanagers require that decisions come through them or they may be reversed. Leaders consider all points of view and are decisive–and they encourage others on their team to do the same.

    6. Do you need to be copied on everything? Micromanagers need to be in on every email thread and meeting summary. Leaders honor privacy and trust their employees to inform them of what they need to know.

    7. Do you insist on sitting in on all meetings? Micromanagers want to be included in any meetings with executives, key clients or vendors, or anyone else worthy of their attention. Leaders respect their team members and trust that they will handle things appropriately.

    8. Do you have to have everything done your way? Micromanagers always set very specific terms when they assign a task; they basically require that it be done exactly as they would do it themselves. Leaders know they can’t do everything themselves, and they give team members room for their own ideas and work style.

    9. Do you get bogged down with details? Micromanagers rarely have time for things like strategy, because they’re too focused on the day-to-day details to get the big picture. Leaders know details are important, but they concentrate on building a team with a compelling vision, collaboration and an engaging culture.

    10. Do you think you are smarter than most other people? Micromanagers secretly (or not so secretly) believe they’re smarter, faster, and more skilled than the people who work for them. Leaders know that they probably don’t have all the answers, but they surround themselves with talented people who can help figure it out.

    11. Do you need to be in control? Micromanagers are constantly “just checking in.” Leaders know that leadership is not about control or power but inspiration, empowerment, and supporting those on your team so they can be and do their best.

    12. Do you require people to check in constantly? Micromanagers need to know where their employees are and what they are doing at each moment of the work day. They track their cell phones, their contacts, and their personal information so they can reach them anytime they’re needed. Leaders show professional respect and understand that everyone needs some down time.

    13. Do you double check everyone’s work? Micromanagers are constantly going behind everyone to check and make changes, even if there’s nothing wrong. Leaders may check in at critical points in a process, but they have confidence in their people to do their job well.

    14. Do you have to be included in all correspondence? Micromanagers insist that employees copy or blind copy them on all “important” emails–and of course everything is important. Leaders know the difference between vital information and daily trivia.

    15. Do you meet before meetings? Micromanagers often hold meetings before meetings to make sure employees are prepared, and meetings after the meetings to make sure things happened as planned. Leaders help people with appropriate preparation. They create an agenda and structure meetings in a way that ensures vital points are addressed.

    16. Do you have a lot of turnover? Micromanagers create a toxic work environment that inhibits creativity and autonomy. Most people will only tolerate such negativity for a short time before leaving for the next thing that comes along. Leaders understand the importance of creating an engaging and empowering culture that allows people to showcase their talents. They invest time and care in their people, and team members leave only to follow new professional opportunities.

    17. Do you find you are doing everything yourself? Micromanagers complain that their employees never take any initiative or come up with new ideas–and for them this confirms that they’re the only one qualified to do the work. Leaders take pride in knowing how to delegate, coach, mentor and support others in taking initiative.

    So which is it? Are you a micromanager or a leader? Even if you’re less than happy with your answer, the good news is that it’s never too late to change.

     


    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    THE LEADERSHIP GAP

    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post 17 Signs You’re Actually a Micromanager appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:05:32 on 2017/10/03 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Micromanager, Urgent,   

    How to Manage A Leader Who Makes Everything Urgent 


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    Have you ever worked with a boss who made everything so urgent that you never
    knew what was truly important? If so, you probably haven’t forgotten how frustrating
    it is to be unable to prioritize.

    Or you may have worked for someone who required an immediate response for
    every little request, making you feel like you were living in a constant state of
    emergency.

    Or maybe you’ve had to choose between two genuinely critical priorities, both
    equally important to your boss.

    In reality, when everything is labeled urgent, it turns out that nothing really is. We
    can’t know what’s important, which means we can’t know how to respond. You
    may not be able to change your boss, but you can change how you respond to
    make the best of a bad situation. Here are some helpful ideas:

    Manage your boss. Before you can manage the emergencies, you have to learn
    to manage your boss. The way you respond to your boss’s urgent requests can
    either reinforce their way of acting or steer yourself in a healthier direction.

    Tackle the issue head-on. When the next five-alarm fire comes along,
    communicate the challenge to your boss and ask them for a plan to help you
    deal with the competing priorities. Face the facts and don’t let your emotions
    get in the way. Don’t wait until your boss approaches you and asks you why
    you haven’t done what you were told to do.

    Manage expectations. Anytime your boss wants you to do something, it’s
    important to be able to manage expectations. If you’re concerned that you
    can’t finish the assignment on time, or that doing so will keep you from meeting
    another priority, keep your boss informed.

    Talk with your boss frequently. It’s important to keep your boss updated on
    your progress, good and bad news, and what you might need help with in the
    future. If you are struggling with an assignment or have finished early, let the
    boss know. Another benefit of frequent communication with the boss is that you’ll
    have a chance to build a rapport, which will make it easier for you to communicate
    during difficult times.

    Identify your own priorities. If your boss is all about making everything urgent,
    diving in immediately may be right thing to do. But depending on your other
    duties and tasks, there may be good reasons to shift your boss’s request
    down the list. Identify for yourself and your boss what you expect to get
    done on what schedule. As long as you can commit to a specific time,
    this will often be sufficient.

    Leaders who are driven by excessive urgency often do so because they
    themselves can’t prioritize what is urgent and what is not. The best way
    to handle such a boss is to inform, communicate and educate them.
    When you do, it will help them be a better leader and achieve better
    relationships and performance from others.

    Lead from Within: Leaders need to remember that when everything
    is urgent nothing really is.


    Learn how to be the best leader you can be in my National Bestseller book:
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post How to Manage A Leader Who Makes Everything Urgent appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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