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  • feedwordpress 08:00:14 on 2019/04/11 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Life Skills, , , , , ,   

    What Happens When Your Team Turns On You 


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    As a leader, you want to think that your team would never turn on you, but it does happen—even to the most confident and competent of leaders. Maybe drama from another part of the organization has spread, or a charismatic team member has developed a grudge against your leadership, or you’ve inherited (or unwittingly created) a bad situation. Whatever the reason, it’s both discouraging and demoralizing when you find yourself with your team in mutiny—refusing to do what you ask, or going in their own direction, or excluding you from things you need to know and decide.

    The way you respond in such a situation is critical. Here are the steps you can take to regain your team’s trust and commitment:

    Acknowledge the problem. The first step can be the hardest—you have to get it out there. If you don’t address what’s happening, it will only get worse. Talk to your team as soon as possible. Be open, direct, and vulnerable. Opening up lines of honest communication is the first step in restoring your leadership.

    Work to understand the source. Try to get the clearest and most complete understanding possible of what caused the problem in the first place. Ask questions of your team to get to the root of the issue. Even if it’s uncomfortable, you want to find the source of the breakdown.

    Encourage people to express themselves. Allow people to air their grievances and let them speak their mind. With respect and without judgment, open up a space for expression. Tell people to come to you if they have a problem with you, then demonstrate your willingness to listen and deal with the issues. This foundation will help in solving the current problem and will also prevent recurrences.

    Take ownership. This step may be difficult, especially if you honestly believe you haven’t done anything wrong, but if enough people are telling you there’s a problem with how you lead, communicate or work, you need to take ownership. As I always tell my clients: what you don’t own owns you. This step is a big one in reclaiming your leadership. One of the hallmarks of great leaders is the ability to take feedback as a gift and take ownership of their mishaps, so consider it a time of learning and growth rather than punishment.

    Ask for help. This step is another one that may be difficult, because too many of us feel asking for help is a sign of weakness. But in fact the opposite is true: when you ask for help, you’re demonstrating that you have strength to find and use every possible resource to reach your goal.

    Work on a solution. The biggest problems can have the best solutions. Work on solving the issue by addressing it head-on. Make a plan for implementing change and let people know they’ve been heard. The best leaders treat problems as opportunities to do things better the second time around.

    Hire a coach. Connect with a coach or consultant who can help you navigate your way back to calmer waters. Working with a coach will show your team that you’re taking their feedback seriously, that you’re addressing your weaknesses and committed to doing better. It can also help you understand your leadership style and the disconnect with your team.

    Lead from within: If your team turns against you, turn back toward them to help improve the situation for everyone.

     


    N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post What Happens When Your Team Turns On You appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:56 on 2019/03/07 Permalink
    Tags: , , King Of Scotland, , , Leadership Lesson, Life Skills, , , Spider, , ,   

    A Big Leadership Lesson from a Small Spider 


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    There’s a story about Robert the Bruce (Robert I), a 14th-century king of Scotland. As he was struggling to protect his kingdom against the English, he found himself driven from his castle and forced to flee to keep from being taken prisoner. Feeling completely defeated and at a loss about what to do next, he took refuge in a cave.

    Soon he spotted a small spider spinning its web. He watched as the spider would spin and then stop, spin and stop. Each time it didn’t make a move for a long while, he thought it had given up and failed in its task. But each time it eventually started again, moving with slow determination. And in time, after many stops and starts, it completed its web.

    The king reflected on the three characteristics that made the spider successful—patience, awareness, and determination—and set out to apply them to his own situation.

    To gain patience, he cleared and sat quietly until he found himself calming down and collecting his composure.

    To cultivate awareness, he thought about the situation he was in and what it would take for him to survive in the short term and continue ruling his country. This awareness not only calmed him down but also allowed him to see things in a new way, removing some of the darkness he’d been under.

    To embody determination, he thought about coming out of the cave ready to fight and do whatever it would take to regain his kingdom.

    The king left the cave with patience, awareness and determination. The fight was long and difficult, with its own starts and stops, but within a few years Scotland prevailed and gained its independence.

    That little spider, gone for centuries, changed the course of history. And we can still apply its lessons today.

    When you find yourself in a challenging situation, ask yourself how you can attain patience. It is patience—with yourself, with your circumstances, and with your thinking—that will give you the wisdom to find new solutions to old problems.

    When you feel everything is conspiring against you, ask yourself what awareness you need to cultivate. Awareness can help you understand that even when you cannot change a situation, you can always change yourself. Developing the ability to tolerate negative circumstances will make you rethink who you are as a leader.

    When you want to give up, ask yourself how you can dig a little bit deeper to find your determination. Great leadership comes from embodying grit, using your inner strength to persist, not allowing any setbacks to stop you from moving toward your mission.

    Leadership lessons are all around us. If a king can learn the most important lesson of his life from a spider, how much can we learn from the people, the things and the opportunities we experience every day if we stay open and pay attention?

    Lead from within: Some of your most valuable leadership lessons will come from unexpected sources. What will you take away?

     


    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    Photo Credit: iStock Photo

    The post A Big Leadership Lesson from a Small Spider appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:46 on 2019/02/05 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Life Skills, , , , ,   

    10 Things Successful Leaders Never Tolerate 


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    Successful leadership is the product of several factors. Skill and education play a part, but one of the most important hallmarks of great leaders is the standards they uphold. That means building good habits of action and thought, and drawing a firm line at things that are unacceptable. It’s about what they do, but it’s also about what they’ll never take part in or allow in their team.

    Here are some top examples:

    1. Inertia. The reality of leadership is this that yesterday’s results become today’s status quo. Leaders need to constantly be moving forward and prepared to seize opportunities. Inaction is incompatible with strong leadership.

    2. Poor communication. The best leaders put communication at the heart of their leadership. Their communication is timely, clear, and appropriate, and they expect the same of those around them—because communication is a two-way street.

    3. Mediocrity. Successful leaders are ordinary people who aspire to the extraordinary. They’re constantly looking to break through expectations—their own and other people’s—and they’re never interested in hearing “good enough.”

    4. Ambivalence. Successful leaders don’t have the time or patience for indecision. They understand that to achieve success, you must put aside fear and doubt, pick a course and stick to it. Their decisions are grounded in knowledge and strategic thought, but they don’t waffle or create subcommittees to examine every detail first.

    5. Toxic relationships. Successful leaders don’t waste their valuable time and energy on negative relationships. They set boundaries, distance themselves from negativity and redirect their focus firmly on the positive. Positivity is fuel for progress.

    6. Dishonesty. Successful leaders understand that dishonesty destroys reputations and, ultimately, success. If you can’t be counted on to be honest, what kind of leader are you?

    7. Disrespect. Successful leaders treat every person they encounter with respect. They earn respect, in part, because of their willingness to show respect to others, and they don’t allow anyone around them to be treated disrespectfully or to be disrespectful.

    8. Fear. Leaders are human, and no one is without fear. But the best leaders understand that to succeed, they must tackle their fears and move through them to succeed. They feel their fear and keep going.

    9. Negativity. Successful leaders avoid negativity because they know it can only hold them back. Nothing good comes from being negative; negativity only breeds more negativity.

    10. Lack of integrity. Successful leaders understand the importance of integrity. Anyone around them who lacks integrity compromises their work, their team and their leadership. They lead with character in everything they do, and they expect others to do the same.

    There are many more things successful leaders don’t tolerate—this list is just a few of the most important. Let it remind you to keep your tolerance low when it comes to compromising who you are and who you can become.

    Lead from within: To build a successful career and life as a leader, know where you draw the line on anything that can harm your leadership and your team.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photos

    The post 10 Things Successful Leaders Never Tolerate appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:40 on 2018/07/31 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Life Skills, , , ,   

    6 Big Career Mistakes That Can Sabotage Your Future  


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    We all make all kinds of mistakes—some because we’re inexperienced, some because we don’t know what we know, and some, unfortunately, because we have a tendency to keep repeating that one mistake until we finally learn our lesson.

    Thankfully, most mistakes don’t do lasting harm and can even benefit us in the long run. There are, however, some mistakes that are so damaging they amount to career sabotage. Here are six of the worst:

    Believing you must KNOW everything and DO everything to be successful. It’s important to become a subject matter expert, but when you think you have to know everything and do everything, you are setting yourself up to fail. You come across not only as a micromanager but also as someone who doesn’t trust your team or colleagues. The most successful people are good at letting those who are qualified do their job and at finding ways to collaborate and work together to get things done.

    Thinking your leadership skills will develop naturally with time. Big mistake! You can be extremely competent in what you do, but if you don’t have any leadership coaching, mentoring or guidance, don’t expect to keep moving up—or even to stay where you are. Everyone who leads others has to be constantly working on their leadership development. As a leadership coach for top executives, I see this all the time—those who get promoted to prestige jobs don’t think they need any more coaching. But leadership is a skill that requires constant nurturing and developing. It may mean devoting time each day to your growth as a leader or hiring a coach  to help you sharpen your interpersonal skills and build your confidence.

    Suffering from S.O.S. (Shiny Object Syndrome) SOS is an ailment of distraction, and it affects businessmen and women who are entrepreneurial, specifically because of the qualities that make them unique: high levels of motivation, a craving for new technology and new developments, and the courage to start new projects and create new things. Think of a small child chasing after something shiny. Once they get there and see what the object is, they immediately lose interest and start chasing the next thing. I am sure you can see how this would derail a successful career. Once you reach a certain level, success isn’t about getting new opportunities but getting the right opportunities. The time you spend looking for the next new opportunity is time you could be working on your own goals or simply enjoying your life.

    Putting your life on hold while you chase success. If you don’t have a life, you don’t have a career. Thinking that putting in longer hours will make you more successful is a big mistake. It’s not the hours but the quality of what happens in those hours that matters. I have seen gifted, talented individuals who work all day and all night and still are not as effective as those who come in early and leave early so they can have time with their family. Study after study shows that you’re at your most effective when you take breaks, nourish your body, walk, exercise, meditate. Don’t work yourself ragged, neglecting your family, friends, and health in hopes that things will improve. Prioritize your tasks and become more efficient, and you can spend less time at the office.

    Chasing the title but not being equipped for the role. Those who are average at what they do chase after titles more than results and effectiveness. Seeking out high status instead of focusing on building skills may not be the only way to disrupt your career, but it will get the job done. Stay focused on the substance, not the symbol.

    Burning the bridge and not understanding the effects of the fire. You never want to become that person that the HR people use as an example: “I have a good story—a good example of what not to do when you leave a job.” Those good stories make for bad references and missed opportunities. And far too often they’re about poor behavior during an exit from the company. It’s easy to get swept up in the excitement of wanting to tell everyone what’s wrong, what isn’t working and how the place you have been is the worst place. It may feel good in the moment—everyone who’s ever had a bad job understands the desire to go out this way—but it isn’t likely to change anything and it will cost you in long-term career damage.

    The important principle is never to make the same mistake twice, especially when they’re mistakes that will derail your career.

    Lead From Within: Keep growing in strength and in knowledge and stay focused on your goals, and you’ll never have to make those mistakes that will derail your career

     


     

    N A T I O N A L    B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photo

    The post 6 Big Career Mistakes That Can Sabotage Your Future  appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:07 on 2018/07/03 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Energy, , , , Life Skills, , , , ,   

    How Successful Leader Manage Their Energy Not Their Time 


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    Many of the leaders I work with are anxious to hear tips on time management. But after working with business leaders and executives for over three decades, I’ve come to realize that the most effective and successful leaders treat time management as a secondary concern. For them, it’s energy management that produces real results.

    Most of my clients—and most leaders in general—have a lot to accomplish. When it feels like there aren’t enough hours in the day to do what you need to do, it’s all too easy to push yourself beyond your limits. As a result, you can become burned out long before you accomplish your goals.

    When I coach my clients on using their time effectively, the first step is to work on managing their energy. It can be challenging in our overscheduled and hurried world, but here are some of the fundamental principles:

    It’s about getting the rest you need. People try to get everything done in an all-nighter, but in fact the longer you stay up the less productive you become. It’s best to get a good night’s sleep and start fresh.

    It’s about quality, not quantity. I don’t know any business leaders who don’t have too much to do. It’s not about how much you can get done but how you get it done. Quality always wins out over quantity. It may even give you the zest to do more—it is a powerful feeling when you get things done with excellence.

    It’s about being present without being distracted. The best way to manage your energy and time is to be fully present with whatever, or whoever, needs your attention. When you have true focus, you can accomplish tasks twice as fast with more energy left over.

    It’s about taking small breaks. Multiple studies have found that you have more energy for the day’s tasks, especially work-related tasks, if you take short breaks throughout the day. Those can be as simple as five to 10 minutes of stepping away from your work space and getting into a different mental zone — for instance, taking a short walk, completing an unrelated task, listening to a favorite song or reading something else. Research suggests that distracting yourself briefly once an hour gives you more energy to work during the day productively.

    It’s about working out. You’ve likely heard it a thousand times already: exercise gives you endorphins, endorphins make you happy and being happy gives you energy. When you feel like you don’t have the energy to exercise and you drag yourself to the gym, you’ll leave feeling more energized. Numerous studies point to regular exercise as having a significant role in increasing energy levels and reducing fatigue.

    Lead from within: If you are truly mindful of your energy and you manage it well, you’re likely to become far more productive—and, as a result, a more effective leader.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post How Successful Leader Manage Their Energy Not Their Time appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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