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  • feedwordpress 09:00:05 on 2021/01/19 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , Life Balance, , , , , ,   

    The Leadership Quality That Will Help You Get Comfortable With Crisis 


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    In times of crisis, one of the most important roles of leadership is setting an example that shows others how to respond. In uncertain times people look up for guidance—they watch those in charge to see how to manage their anxiety and stay focused and motivated.

    The secret to leading in such situations is staying mindful. Act in the awareness that you’re working to help those around you feel more comfortable in a difficult time. That means bringing the core principle of understanding to everything you do.

    Here are some ways to bring understanding to your crisis leadership:

    Be approachable and available. Understanding begins with letting those you lead know you’re in this with them, which means being present and available. Be generous in the time and attention you provide, and make sure you’re doing more listening than speaking. Give people space to express their anxiety, stress and fears. Remember that you don’t have to try to fix everything—help where you can, but stay within appropriate boundaries. What’s most important is your willingness to listen with empathy and presence.

    Be sensitive to what other people are feeling. People have strong feelings in times of difficulty, and as their leader it’s your place to let them feel without trying to make it to be about you or the organization. Never negate anyone’s feelings by telling them “Don’t be anxious” (or scared or sad or whatever they’re feeling). Empathize and, if you can, point them toward resources or information that may be helpful. Be sensitive not only to the feelings people are expressing but also to those they’re silent about.

    Be flexible but grounded. To be understanding is to make the changes that might be needed or helpful in response to shifting circumstances while maintaining the stability people hold on to in difficult times. You need to find the balance between being flexible and adaptable on the one hand and strong and grounded on the other.

    Be determined and showcase perseverance. To be understanding of others you first need to know about yourself. Tap into your own determination and motivation. Think about ways you’ve persevered in the past, and share those experiences with others. In this as in all things, your example is your most powerful leadership tool. Show them how it’s done through your own actions and by sharing your stories and those of people you admire.

    Leading people through uncomfortable times is never easy, but it’s part of every leader’s responsibility to help them become as comfortable as possible. And that’s done by being approachable, available, strong and adaptable, and by remembering that the people you’re leading may not have been through a significant trial before this.

    Lead from within: If you can help others be comfortable being uncomfortable, they’ll be prepared to handle whatever situation comes along.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post The Leadership Quality That Will Help You Get Comfortable With Crisis appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:50 on 2020/07/28 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Life Balance, , , ,   

    Is Your Leader Really as Bad As You Think 


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    As with anything else in the world, there are good leaders and bad leaders. If you’ve experienced a really good leader, be thankful. And if you’ve ever worked with a horrible leader, you know what a miserable experience that is.

    If you’re in that situation now, though, consider the possibility that your leader isn’t as awful as you think. Maybe, just maybe, the person who needs to make some adjustments is you. Ask yourself truthfully if any of these descriptions sound like you:

    You tend to view the glass as half empty. Most of us like to think of ourselves as realists, but it’s possible that you’re looking at the world through a pessimistic or defeatist lens, coloring your perspective and even your outcomes. Maybe your leader isn’t the problem—or at least not the whole problem.

    You struggle with delegating. If you find yourself controlling or monitoring everything that everyone around you is doing, watching and commenting and picking apart the work of others, and struggling to delegate even when your boss tells you that you need to, you have a problem with micromanagement. Giving other people room to work without looking over their shoulder will improve your relationship with your boss—and with everyone else on your team.

    You keep stepping on toes. Overstepping is right next door to micromanagement, but it takes the form of doing tasks that fall completely outside your area of responsibility. When you overstep, you show a profound lack of faith in those around you, and ultimately in the leader who made the assignments. Your boss and others will be happier if you stay in your lane.

    You have all the answers and rarely ask questions. People who think they have all the answers don’t feel the need to ask questions. But if you don’t ask questions, you have no way of knowing if your answer is the best possible or if it’s completely inaccurate. If you aren’t seeking out as much information as you can to solve an issue, you’re part of the problem.

    You isolate yourself. There are times at work when you want to isolate yourself. You might have an urgent project or some work that requires intense concentration. And if you’re an introvert, you may work best alone. Isolation is a different matter. Refusing to engage with those around you leads to lost productivity and damaged relationships. Ask yourself if you should be more engaging and inclusive with your team

    If you suspect you’re guilty of any of these behaviors, know that you’re playing a major role in your own unhappiness. Instead of pointing fingers at your boss, change your own direction before you do lasting harm to your mental health or career success.

    Lead from within: Whether you’re a leader, manager, boss or person who aspires to become one, there is a lot you have to do to hone your craft. Don’t be one of those people who point fingers at others, because your leader might not be as horrible as you think.


    #1  N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Is Your Leader Really as Bad As You Think appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:50 on 2020/07/28 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Life Balance, , , ,   

    Is Your Leader Really as Bad As You Think 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    As with anything else in the world, there are good leaders and bad leaders. If you’ve experienced a really good leader, be thankful. And if you’ve ever worked with a horrible leader, you know what a miserable experience that is.

    If you’re in that situation now, though, consider the possibility that your leader isn’t as awful as you think. Maybe, just maybe, the person who needs to make some adjustments is you. Ask yourself truthfully if any of these descriptions sound like you:

    You tend to view the glass as half empty. Most of us like to think of ourselves as realists, but it’s possible that you’re looking at the world through a pessimistic or defeatist lens, coloring your perspective and even your outcomes. Maybe your leader isn’t the problem—or at least not the whole problem.

    You struggle with delegating. If you find yourself controlling or monitoring everything that everyone around you is doing, watching and commenting and picking apart the work of others, and struggling to delegate even when your boss tells you that you need to, you have a problem with micromanagement. Giving other people room to work without looking over their shoulder will improve your relationship with your boss—and with everyone else on your team.

    You keep stepping on toes. Overstepping is right next door to micromanagement, but it takes the form of doing tasks that fall completely outside your area of responsibility. When you overstep, you show a profound lack of faith in those around you, and ultimately in the leader who made the assignments. Your boss and others will be happier if you stay in your lane.

    You have all the answers and rarely ask questions. People who think they have all the answers don’t feel the need to ask questions. But if you don’t ask questions, you have no way of knowing if your answer is the best possible or if it’s completely inaccurate. If you aren’t seeking out as much information as you can to solve an issue, you’re part of the problem.

    You isolate yourself. There are times at work when you want to isolate yourself. You might have an urgent project or some work that requires intense concentration. And if you’re an introvert, you may work best alone. Isolation is a different matter. Refusing to engage with those around you leads to lost productivity and damaged relationships. Ask yourself if you should be more engaging and inclusive with your team

    If you suspect you’re guilty of any of these behaviors, know that you’re playing a major role in your own unhappiness. Instead of pointing fingers at your boss, change your own direction before you do lasting harm to your mental health or career success.

    Lead from within: Whether you’re a leader, manager, boss or person who aspires to become one, there is a lot you have to do to hone your craft. Don’t be one of those people who point fingers at others, because your leader might not be as horrible as you think.


    #1  N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Is Your Leader Really as Bad As You Think appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:10 on 2020/06/30 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , Life Balance, , , , , , ,   

    Why Every Leader Needs to Spend Time Alone 


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    Studies have long shown that chronic loneliness and isolation are damaging to people’s mental and physical health. But a balanced amount of time spent alone has clear benefits—and depending on your temperament, it may be a necessity. It can even help strengthen your leadership. Here’s how:

    Improved social relationships. At first glance, it doesn’t make sense to improve your social relationships by being alone . But when you take the time to look inward, defining your needs and priorities, your social life will be better spent. Similarly, time alone can improve your relationships at work. And the better your relationships, the happier and more productive you’ll be—as a human and as a leader.

    Improved creativity. The best way to foster creativity is to take the time to give yourself a framework of goals, outcomes, objectives and results. If you don’t slow down to do this work you will find yourself going around in circles. And once you’ve determined a destination, getting and staying in touch with your creativity requires the kind of deep dives that are best accomplished alone.

    Improved confidence. Many leaders subscribe to the mantra fake it till you make it, but as a leadership coach I have seen this approach cause far too many implosions. Instead, lead from within by developing an understanding of who you are and what you’re good at. From there you can build on your strengths and leverage your weaknesses in authentic ways that benefit both you and those you lead. It’s a deeply rewarding process, one that will benefit you in every way, and it requires spending the kind of focused time and energy that you can find only when you’re alone.

    Improved emotional regulation. Most leaders have a thousand things coming at them all at once. Those who spend some daily time centering themselves in quiet meditation, prayer, or thought are able take it in stride. Those who never give their nerves a break from the constant overstimulation and chaos of the work day are far more likely to react badly as soon as something goes off track.

    Improved decision making. When decisions need to be made—and especially when they need to be made quickly—the best leaders take a moment to themselves. They aren’t stalling—they’re making a peaceful space to review their options, make sure they’re thinking clearly and accounting for everything. A little focused time yields clear, well-thought-out decisions.

    Many people, especially those who are extroverts by nature, may find it hard to spend time alone. But if you can develop a regular practice of closing your door to the world, you’ll give yourself time with your thoughts and a space for your mind to wander in new directions. Time alone can be restorative, building your confidence, creativity, and productivity, and helping you better engage with others.

    Lead from within: Give yourself a break and spend some more time alone so you can become the leader you are meant to be.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Why Every Leader Needs to Spend Time Alone appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:52 on 2020/05/26 Permalink
    Tags: , , Control Freak, , , , Life Balance, , , ,   

    How to Be A Great Leader In A World Of Control Freaks 


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    Chances are, somewhere in your professional or personal life you’ve encountered an all-out control freak. They’re the ones who think they know best about everything, who refuse to delegate anything, who incessantly judge other people’s choices, and who want to micromanage every detail of everything they’re part of. Forced to go with someone else’s plan, they may quickly become moody or sulky.

    There’s certainly no shortage of control freaks in most organizations. You may not be able to escape them, but as a leader it’s part of your job to mitigate their behavior and show them more effective alternatives. Here are some ways to protect your team from control freaks and turn controlling team members toward a leadership mindset:

    Embrace opportunities to give useful feedback. Take advantage of opportunities to call controlling behavior as you see it. Candid feedback, given with humility and compassion, can be a powerful weapon to encourage control freaks to let go and find a helpful role within their team.

    Set and maintain boundaries. Great leaders know the difference between what you create and what you allow, and healthy boundaries help you differentiate between the two. It’s part of your role as leader to set limits on your team’s culture, so keep control freaks from taking over by emphasizing interdependence and shared decision making. People in organizations are constantly looking to see how leaders react to trends and situations, so stay on top of control issues.

    Remain authentic. Many leaders believe they have to constantly portray themselves as confident and optimistic. While it’s important to set a positive tone, I’m not a big believer in the “fake it till you make it” approach. Be your authentic self, even when you’re not feeling confident or optimistic. Being honest about the times when you don’t feel completely in control sets a good example by letting everyone know it’s OK not to be on top of everything every minute.

    Communicate clearly and compassionately. Whether you’re dealing with the more controlling members of your team or the people they’re trying to control, remember to communicate clearly and concisely—and always with compassion. The best leaders understand that if their message is going to be heard, it has to be expressed with empathy and concern.

    Lead by example. The biggest issue with control freaks is thinking they know it all. In a position of leadership, you can demonstrate that no one has all the answers, that delegation benefits everyone, and that the best decisions are made by including diverse perspectives. Show that you’re not driven by trying to control opinions, people or any decisions. Ultimately, leadership by example is the best way to move control freaks toward a leadership mindset.

    Lead from within: Although the cost of having control freaks in your organization may be invisible, the price everyone pays is real. It’s part of your job to rein them in and show them a better way.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Be A Great Leader In A World Of Control Freaks appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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