Tagged: Leadership Development Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • feedwordpress 22:50:27 on 2021/05/19 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Leadership Development, , , Self Serving   

    Why Being a Self Serving Leader is So Dangerous 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    Good leadership is focused on others, but self-serving leadership undermines that principle to focus on the ego and the symptoms can take hold and begin damaging your leadership before you’re even aware. Be on guard against these signs so you can recognize them in yourself before they take root and grow:

    Arguing. If you find yourself often arguing with others or in a mindset where you’re right and others are wrong, you’re likely coming across as rigid and unwilling to listen. Stop arguing and start being open to finding points of agreement.

    Absence. If you’re always engaged in something else when your people need you, they’ll see you as distracted, absorbed and preoccupied. Work to becoming a leader who empowers, inspires and motivates by being available and accessible.

    Defensiveness. When your leadership is about protecting and defending yourself, you’re likely to find yourself working against those you’re supposed to be leading.

    Boasting. When you take all the credit instead of sharing it with your team, you show them where your priorities are, so don’t expect them to work so hard next time. Spotlight your people instead of yourself.

    Bluster. If you’re in the habit of speaking over others, interrupting, and making statements without allowing others to respond or express their own thoughts, you kill the energy and ideas of your team. Talk less and listen more.

    Competitiveness. Competition can spur people to do great work, but if you’re competing against those you lead, you’re setting a bad example. Remember that they’re on your side; work to elevate their performance and focus your competitive side elsewhere.

    Envy. When you’re jealous or begrudging of those you lead, remember that leadership at its core is taking pleasure in other people’s success. Celebrate, appreciate and recognize the work and success of others.

    Self-promotion. If your leadership is ego-driven, you’re missing the point. Turn your attention to elevating those you lead, not yourself. Any time you  find yourself wanting to promote yourself, change it up and honor your team instead.

    Delusion. if you’re basing your leadership on a false impression of your own self-importance, you need to understand that grandstanding serves only to isolate you from those you are trying to influence and lead, and it’s counterproductive to bringing people together to do great things. Break down the false and misleading impressions you have of yourself and practice leading from reality.

    Ego. When you think of leadership as something you do to serve yourself, your leadership is bogged down in ego. Instead, try dedicating your energy to helping others be successful. Be known as a leader who serves others instead of yourself.

    Self-serving leadership is dangerous to you and to those you lead. Few things can do more to undermine your influence, respect and trust.

    Lead from within: It’s easy to fall into self-serving leadership behaviors, even if it’s not the way you normally operate. So be a thoughtful leader who is self-aware at all times.


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    The post Why Being a Self Serving Leader is So Dangerous appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 10:50:53 on 2021/05/04 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , Leadership Development, , , , , ,   

    Your Leadership Is Contagious—Whether You Know It Or Not 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    When standards in an organization change, the process tends to be so gradual that it’s not readily noticeable. One day you look around and realize that things that used to be unacceptable are now commonplace. Whether it’s a lax attitude toward work and deadlines, gossip and backbiting, or dishonesty, it’s easy for negative behavior to take hold.

    When norms change, people tend to ask “How did that happen?” I’m here to tell you: it starts at the top. Leadership is contagious, whether leaders know it or not. If a leader’s standards slip, the standards of the organization follow. If leadership’s values are compromised, the values of the business won’t be far behind. It’s imperative to keep close tabs on your own leadership, because others are certain to follow your lead, one by one, until your entire team is affected.

    Here are some of the ways leaders can ensure that their contagious leadership is spreading only good qualities:

    Be consistent and predictable. If you want to be trusted, respected and credible, people have to know that they can count on your conduct to always be consistent.

    Remain true to your values. Let others know who you are and what you stand for, and lead through your example of living out your values every day. Give people reason to feel good about emulating you.

    Evaluate your communications. Leaders communicate a lot, and people are quick to judge those communications as well as the cues they get from body language and nonverbal communication. Think about what you’re saying and—even more important—how you’re saying it.

    Show people what’s most important to you. The quickest way to learn what’s important to someone is to see what they give their time to. Ask yourself if you’re spending your time in ways that reflect your values or if you’re sending mixed messages.

    Take command of your emotions. If you’re quick to lose your temper, if you yell when things go wrong, if you lose patience easily, you’re sending a message to others that it’s OK—and maybe even expected—to do the same. Don’t let your own behavior validate screaming, tantrums, or abuse. Remember, your emotions have the power to make people comfortable or uncomfortable—which do you want it to be?

    Embody positivity. A positive leader means a positive team and positive organization; a negative leader is working to build a team and culture based on negativity.

    Treat others the way you want to be treated. Treat people with respect and dignity and they will treat you—and their coworkers—the same.

    When you’re a leader, your actions are constantly being watched by others. Ask yourself if you want those you lead to emulate what you do and how you do it. If not, be thoughtful of how you lead and commit to setting a good example.

    Lead from within: If you know your leadership is contagious, you’re more likely to exhibit behavior worth catching.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Your Leadership Is Contagious—Whether You Know It Or Not appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:03 on 2021/04/13 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Leadership Development, , , , , ,   

    Why Too Much Passion Is Bad For Your Leadership 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    To keep up with the development and growth of the leaders I coach, I do an annual assessment of their leadership with my clients and with the people they lead. Last year I heard an interesting bit of feedback in one of these sessions: “At times his passion is great, but most of the time it’s overwhelming.”

    I’d never before considered the possibility of a leader’s having too much passion. But since then, I’ve taken some time to think about the highly passionate leaders I’ve worked with. And they do seem to share some tendencies that can lead to problems:

    They can be overwhelming. As I learned directly, passionate leaders can come across as overwhelming without even realizing it. Their passion and enthusiasm can feel like a burden to people who are struggling to keep up with their pace and level of energy.

    They can make everything important. Passionate leaders have a tendency to make everything high priority, and that urgency creates chaos. They may try to make everything urgent—which ironically means nothing can stand out as being important. People need clear priorities.

    They can complicate the simplest matter. Passion can drive complexity, complicating things that should be simple. People are thrown off by unnecessary complication.

    They can be too intense. People want to feel comfortable around their leader. Intensity can easily cross the border to be disturbing or even frightening.

    They aren’t always adaptable. Great leadership is about being adaptable and flexible, able to change course when needed. When passion makes a leader stubborn and unyielding, they’re unable to find new solutions and have difficulty adapting to changing circumstances.

    They can be closed-minded. Leaders need to always hold an open mind. They have to be able to listen to others and learn along the way. Sometimes passion leads to the kind of certainty that closes a leader’s mind and shuts others out.

    They can be intimidating. Some leaders express their passion by speaking loud and long, which may unnerve people and leave little room for them to express their thoughts.

    But here’s the good news: It’s possible for passionate people to lead without being overwhelming, complicating and rigid. The secret is staying attuned to others. To be an effective leader means being able to read the room and meet people where they are—not where you want them to be.

    Leaders who are admired for their passion are inclusive. They listen when others speak, they stay flexible and adaptable, and they’re great communicators.

    When passionate leadership is about a single-minded perspective and a narrow mindset, it’s likely to go off on the wrong track. But when it’s about making others better, serving the organization and guiding a vision, it can be a source of tremendous strength.

    Lead from within: The world needs passionate leaders, but make sure you avoid the traps of overly passionate leadership.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Why Too Much Passion Is Bad For Your Leadership appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:03 on 2021/04/13 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Leadership Development, , , , , ,   

    Why Too Much Passion Is Bad For Your Leadership 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    To keep up with the development and growth of the leaders I coach, I do an annual assessment of their leadership with my clients and with the people they lead. Last year I heard an interesting bit of feedback in one of these sessions: “At times his passion is great, but most of the time it’s overwhelming.”

    I’d never before considered the possibility of a leader’s having too much passion. But since then, I’ve taken some time to think about the highly passionate leaders I’ve worked with. And they do seem to share some tendencies that can lead to problems:

    They can be overwhelming. As I learned directly, passionate leaders can come across as overwhelming without even realizing it. Their passion and enthusiasm can feel like a burden to people who are struggling to keep up with their pace and level of energy.

    They can make everything important. Passionate leaders have a tendency to make everything high priority, and that urgency creates chaos. They may try to make everything urgent—which ironically means nothing can stand out as being important. People need clear priorities.

    They can complicate the simplest matter. Passion can drive complexity, complicating things that should be simple. People are thrown off by unnecessary complication.

    They can be too intense. People want to feel comfortable around their leader. Intensity can easily cross the border to be disturbing or even frightening.

    They aren’t always adaptable. Great leadership is about being adaptable and flexible, able to change course when needed. When passion makes a leader stubborn and unyielding, they’re unable to find new solutions and have difficulty adapting to changing circumstances.

    They can be closed-minded. Leaders need to always hold an open mind. They have to be able to listen to others and learn along the way. Sometimes passion leads to the kind of certainty that closes a leader’s mind and shuts others out.

    They can be intimidating. Some leaders express their passion by speaking loud and long, which may unnerve people and leave little room for them to express their thoughts.

    But here’s the good news: It’s possible for passionate people to lead without being overwhelming, complicating and rigid. The secret is staying attuned to others. To be an effective leader means being able to read the room and meet people where they are—not where you want them to be.

    Leaders who are admired for their passion are inclusive. They listen when others speak, they stay flexible and adaptable, and they’re great communicators.

    When passionate leadership is about a single-minded perspective and a narrow mindset, it’s likely to go off on the wrong track. But when it’s about making others better, serving the organization and guiding a vision, it can be a source of tremendous strength.

    Lead from within: The world needs passionate leaders, but make sure you avoid the traps of overly passionate leadership.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Why Too Much Passion Is Bad For Your Leadership appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 11:47:25 on 2021/04/06 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Leadership Development, , , , ,   

    How The Best Leaders Avoid Doing Everyone Else’s Job 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    If you’re a leader, a manager or a boss, you know how things come at you—all at once, all the time, without stopping, and with people relying on you to respond quickly and decisively.

    The ability to respond to complex situations and make rapid-fire decisions is necessary to great leadership, and it’s grounded in knowing how to keep your perspective and avoid distractions.

    Here are some of the ways the best leaders maintain a clear view on their own roles and responsibilities and avoid doing everyone else’s job.

    They focus on what’s important. Leaders with perspective don’t allow themselves to be sidetracked by checking off items on the to-do list of others. Instead, they stay connected to the things that are most important to them and keep their attention concentrated there—every day, all the time.

    They keep their emotions out of it. We all know leaders who worry and are fearful that others might not be doing their job as well as they can. The best leaders keep their emotions in check, and concentrate on their own responsibilities. They may feel fear and worry, but they trust their people and their experience to do their jobs.

    They listen to learn. The best leaders are always interested in gaining new understanding, educating themselves in new areas and becoming better informed. Don’t be a leader who only makes a show of listening and jumps into act. Listen to learn.

    They let go of their biases. Leaders with perspective don’t allow their own personal experiences and circumstances to obscure their objectivity. They work hard to understand and overcome their biases, if they have judgment on other people’s work, they work hard on letting those biases go, because they know how harmful they can be.

    They don’t make mountains out of molehills. Leaders with perspective don’t blow things out of proportion or respond unreasonably when something goes wrong. They are able to step outside the moment and see mistakes, mishaps and unfortunate circumstances of others, for what they are.

    They have an expansive mindset. Leaders with perspective see the whole rather than fragmented pieces. They make a point of focusing on the big picture and the long-range view.

    They don’t judge or make assumptions. Judging and assuming are surefire ways to lose perspective. Don’t be one of those leaders who forms opinions or comes to conclusions without hearing all the facts and gathering all the information, because uninformed assumptions can be incredibly damaging.

    They don’t have to be the smartest person in the room. Even if they know a lot, leaders with perspective know that they don’t know it all. Listening to other viewpoints and learning along the way allows them to have a wider and more in-depth understanding.

    It is easy to want to jump in and do everyone else’s job, but when you have much to accomplish yourself, it’s best to concentrate on what you have to do, and do it well.

    Lead from within: When your perspective isn’t clouded by distractions, worry and fear about others, you’ll be able to do your own job more clearly, making you a better leader and a better person.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How The Best Leaders Avoid Doing Everyone Else’s Job appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
esc
cancel

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedlink.class.php on line 302

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedlink.class.php on line 302

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedlink.class.php on line 302

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedlink.class.php on line 302