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  • feedwordpress 08:00:13 on 2020/07/09 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Leadership Development, , , , ,   

    How to Know You’re About To Make A Bad Leadership Decision 


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    Do you know a successful leader who’s made bad decisions? The answer is almost certainly “yes.”

    Decision making is a big part of leadership, and strong leaders pride themselves on their judgment and decisiveness. But even the best of them have made bad decisions at some point—and some of those mistakes were preventable.

    Here are the top red flags that can warn you that you may be making a bad choice. Watch for them in your day-to-day decision making and if you see cause for concern, take some time to reconsider. No decision is without risk, but if you’re thoughtful and deliberate in your decision making, you’ll be right more often than not.

    If you don’t ask for other opinions. Many leaders make the mistake of thinking they have to make decisions on their own. But especially when you’re faced with an important decision, it’s smart to seek out the counsel of others. Talking through the issues with someone you trust can bring clarity and new insights.

    If you decide too quickly. We live in an age where everything seems to require an instant response. The need to make decisions on the fly can lead to mistakes even for the best leaders. Some situations require swift action, but whenever possible give yourself time to process and think.

    If you don’t have all the information you need. The devil is in the details, as the old saying goes, and it’s hard to make a sound decision when you don’t have access to information you need. Carry out your due diligence and do your research. You can’t remove uncertainty from decision making, but you can minimize it by making informed choices.

    If you only want to follow your gut. Many leaders pride themselves on following their gut instinct. For the best, those instincts are grounded in years of education and experience. For most of us, though, our instincts need backup. If all the evidence and facts point in one direction, and your gut disagrees, ask yourself if something else is at work—maybe denial, wishful thinking, or bias. In most situations where you’re facing a significant decision, trust your head more than your gut.

    If you’re too emotional. As a leader, your decisions may be bold, but they also need to be rational. Decisions based on emotion and carried out in the fervent heat of the moment may feel good in the short run, but they aren’t likely to bring good results. Especially if it’s an important decision, take a break and slow things down. Buy yourself some time to quiet your emotions and think things through.

    Making good decisions is not always easy, but heeding the warning signs can help keep you from making bad ones.

    Lead from within: We all make choices, and in the end our choices make us who we are as leaders.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Know You’re About To Make A Bad Leadership Decision appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:17 on 2020/07/07 Permalink
    Tags: , , Leadership Development, , , , , Working Hard,   

    Why You Need to Stop Pushing Yourself So Hard at Work 


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    Most of us believe that in order to succeed, we have to push ourselves hard. Working excessively and compulsively has become the norm, to the degree that Americans are considered workaholics.

    Many of us don’t take the time to think about the toll that working so hard takes on us. But science tells us that overwork is damaging—that pushing yourself too hard comes with serious consequences for your physical and mental health.

    Keep yourself and your employees in mind as you read through these early symptoms of stress from overwork. If they sound familiar, consider finding ways to begin adjusting the norms so everyone within your organization can maintain productivity without sacrificing their health and well-being.

    Chronic irritability. Cranky behavior often signals an imbalance within; it’s a sign that things are not right. Are workloads and expectations creating unhappiness and irritability?

    Feeling that you never do enough. Do you suffer from constantly thinking you you’re not accomplishing enough? Are you always pushing and pressuring yourself to do more, feeling that you can’t even stop to acknowledge what you’ve achieved or celebrate what you’re accomplishing? If so, you need to rebalance your work life.

    Constantly having to be on. Overworked people often feel pressure to be productive all day every day, constantly connected to their computer and devices. If any effort to relax, even for one night, fills you with guilt and anxiety, think about how much unnecessary stress you’re subjecting yourself to.

    Distancing yourself from your personal life. If you find yourself coming up with work-related reasons to avoid doing the things that matter to you and spending time with the people who are important to you, you’re doing damage that will be hard to repair later. The people and causes in your life need your presence, and you’ll never be able to reclaim the time you lose out on with them.

    Compromising on self-care. If you hardly leave your desk, if you’re living on takeout and junk food, if you can’t remember the last time you had a good night’s sleep or worked out or even took a walk, you have a problem that’s going to take a profound toll on your health and well-being. Long-term productivity requires that you keep your body in good working order.

    If pushing yourself too hard at work is harming your life, your relationships, and your mental and physical health, you already know what you need to do. Make it stop, now. Don’t allow yourself to get away with saying “I’ll start taking care of myself after this project is complete” or “I’m only working this hard until my promotion comes through.” Begin today to insist that you, and everyone in your organization, deserves a happy and well-balanced life and take the steps you need to make it happen.

    Sacrificing your well-being in the hopes achieving something great is never smart.

    Lead from within: The way to succeed is not to work long hours, but to work hard in each hour.

     

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    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Why You Need to Stop Pushing Yourself So Hard at Work appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:10 on 2020/06/30 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Leadership Development, , , , , , , ,   

    Why Every Leader Needs to Spend Time Alone 


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    Studies have long shown that chronic loneliness and isolation are damaging to people’s mental and physical health. But a balanced amount of time spent alone has clear benefits—and depending on your temperament, it may be a necessity. It can even help strengthen your leadership. Here’s how:

    Improved social relationships. At first glance, it doesn’t make sense to improve your social relationships by being alone . But when you take the time to look inward, defining your needs and priorities, your social life will be better spent. Similarly, time alone can improve your relationships at work. And the better your relationships, the happier and more productive you’ll be—as a human and as a leader.

    Improved creativity. The best way to foster creativity is to take the time to give yourself a framework of goals, outcomes, objectives and results. If you don’t slow down to do this work you will find yourself going around in circles. And once you’ve determined a destination, getting and staying in touch with your creativity requires the kind of deep dives that are best accomplished alone.

    Improved confidence. Many leaders subscribe to the mantra fake it till you make it, but as a leadership coach I have seen this approach cause far too many implosions. Instead, lead from within by developing an understanding of who you are and what you’re good at. From there you can build on your strengths and leverage your weaknesses in authentic ways that benefit both you and those you lead. It’s a deeply rewarding process, one that will benefit you in every way, and it requires spending the kind of focused time and energy that you can find only when you’re alone.

    Improved emotional regulation. Most leaders have a thousand things coming at them all at once. Those who spend some daily time centering themselves in quiet meditation, prayer, or thought are able take it in stride. Those who never give their nerves a break from the constant overstimulation and chaos of the work day are far more likely to react badly as soon as something goes off track.

    Improved decision making. When decisions need to be made—and especially when they need to be made quickly—the best leaders take a moment to themselves. They aren’t stalling—they’re making a peaceful space to review their options, make sure they’re thinking clearly and accounting for everything. A little focused time yields clear, well-thought-out decisions.

    Many people, especially those who are extroverts by nature, may find it hard to spend time alone. But if you can develop a regular practice of closing your door to the world, you’ll give yourself time with your thoughts and a space for your mind to wander in new directions. Time alone can be restorative, building your confidence, creativity, and productivity, and helping you better engage with others.

    Lead from within: Give yourself a break and spend some more time alone so you can become the leader you are meant to be.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Why Every Leader Needs to Spend Time Alone appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:43 on 2020/06/25 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Leadership Development, , , , , , ,   

    What is the Worst Leadership Styles and Why 


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    People who study leadership theory learn about numerous styles of leadership: autocratic, democratic, strategic, transformational—on and on. It can be interesting to debate the pros and cons of each.

    But whatever theory you subscribe to—or if you’re a self-taught leader who doesn’t believe in theories—there are some styles of leadership that are always detrimental. Here are a few of the worst:

    Know-it-all leadership. People don’t admire leaders who pretend to know everything and insist that whatever they do is right. Leaders who think they’re smarter than everyone else create isolation and quickly come to be resented by their peers and the people on their team.

    Absent leadership. Some leaders are physically absent—always away at a meeting or conference, wandering somewhere else in the building or working from home. Many more are physically present and may even pride themselves on being accessible because their office door is always open. But if they’re distracted and checked out, never really listening or pitching in, they might as well be somewhere else.

    Inflexible leadership. A leader’s behavior is the single biggest factor they bring to bear on influencing others. Agile, creative leadership has the power to energize, engage and motivate people to go the extra mile for their organization. But a leader who’s inflexible and stubborn creates demotivation, poor performance, frequent absences, and high turnover.

    Micromanaging leadership. Micromanagement has a devastating effect on even the best teams, destroying morale and productivity. Part of the problem is that most micromanagers aren’t even aware of what they’re doing. They’re often the ones saying “I don’t believe in micromanagement, but…”. Effective leadership means a commitment to focus on the big picture and on motivating employees, not standing over their shoulder.

    Self-serving leadership. Ego can undermine leadership in two ways. The first is false pride, when you focus on self-promotion and making yourself look good even at the expense of your team or peers. The second is self-doubt or fear, when you lose confidence and question yourself and your abilities. They move in different directions, but they’re equally destructive.

    Leadership by intimidation. Those who lead from fear are often terrified of looking weak, but in trying to look strong they fail themselves and their team. Instead of sharing a vision that motivates, they threaten and complain. Instead of analyzing problems and looking for solutions, they focus on placing blame. Talented team members find new options, leaving only mediocre performers who are lacking enough in confidence to allow themselves to be bullied on a daily basis.

    At the end of the day, every leader has their own preferred style. The important thing is to be aware of what style you’re putting out there and to check in periodically to make sure it’s serving your team and yourself well.

    Lead from within: It’s said that the best sign of a good leader is not how many followers they have, but how many leaders they create. If your leadership style is right, your influence will quickly spread.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post What is the Worst Leadership Styles and Why appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:28 on 2020/06/23 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Leadership Development, , , , , , , ,   

    How to Recognize A Strong Leader In A Group Of People 


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    Strong leaders emerge in different ways and at different times. Some people seem born to leadership, and others build their abilities more slowly. Some have the capacity but need their confidence to develop before they can make best the best use of it. Others don’t step into their leadership until the circumstances call for it—usually in difficult times.

    But in any group of people there will be a few who show leadership qualities, even if they’re not fully developed. Here are some things to look for if you want to know who’s capable of being a strong leader:

    They share their expertise. Those who are supportive of others, those who guide and mentor and are quick to share their expertise are showing key leadership traits. Their attention inspires others to care about what they do, and they’re committed to helping others be their best.

    They are trust builders. People build trust in lots of different ways. Many prospective leaders do so by being competent and reliable in their job. That dependability is the foundation for them to build strong relationships with the people they work with at every level, from their bosses to their peers to support staff. They show integrity, focus on solving problems instead of placing blame, and when things go well they share the credit.

    They are an influence for good in challenging times. People’s true natures tend to emerge when difficulties arise. Some complain or make sure their own interests are served. But those who are empathetic, realistic and proactive—and especially those who look for patterns of recurring challenges and seek ways to solve them—are likely to emerge as true leaders.

    They are emotionally agile. The best leaders know how to manage their emotions and are agile enough to let go of any thoughts, beliefs or emotions that aren’t serving them well. Anyone with that ability has already mastered one of the most challenging components of leadership.

    They are great listeners. Leadership is based on connection, and connection is based on listening. Good listeners—those who seek to understand by asking clarifying questions and by giving their complete attention—have the foundation to make good leaders.

    They don’t wait to be asked. In almost every group there will be few people with no official authority who are quick to step up with support and guidance. Generally it’s the ones who are already excellent at their job, and their combination of helpfulness, initiative, competence and confidence makes them strong contenders for leadership roles.

    You can’t always predict leadership potential, but those who exhibit these positive traits are likely to be effective leaders. Recognize them for who they are, and give them as many opportunities as possible to grow into their potential.

    Lead from within: We sometimes look at leadership in a superficial way. In reality, the person who cares the most is the one who will stand out from a crowd of prospective leaders.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Recognize A Strong Leader In A Group Of People appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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