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  • feedwordpress 09:00:47 on 2021/01/07 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Leader, , , , , ,   

    How to Care for Your Employees’ Mental Health 


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    Most of us have greatly expanded our understanding of stress over these past few months, when we have the usual everyday stresses plus the uncertainty, disruption and chaos of a pandemic. It’s no surprise that mental well-being is becoming increasingly difficult to maintain. As leaders we want what is best for our employees, and that means caring for about their mental health—especially now. Here are some solid steps you can take:

    Break the silence. Leaders can mitigate the stigma around mental health issues by discussing them openly, using mental health resources themselves if needed, and sharing their stories. Make it clear that the workplace is a welcoming and supportive space.

    Keep the dialogue going. Hold communication channels open for discussion, taking care not to pressure anyone to disclose private information. Work with Human Resources to identify and issues and resources, and share the information personally in a meeting or seminar. Let employees see your commitment.

    Provide (or advocate for) mental health resources at your company. The best thing you can do for your employees is to be proactive in meeting their needs. Do everything in your power—ideally through your employee health care plan—to provide accessible, affordable mental health services such as counseling, therapy, and treatment for addiction.

    Maintain regular check-ins: The best leaders stay on top of important issues, and making mental health a top priority means treating it as an ongoing commitment rather than something to check off your to-do list. Communicate regularly about mental health and make sure channels are available to help people those who are feeling overwhelmed.

    Watch for signs that someone’s struggling. If you’re worried about an employee who’s experiencing decreased productivity or a marked change in personality, set up an informal meeting. With discretion, care and compassion, ask how they’re doing—at work and at home. As much as possible, provide assistance by adjusting workloads, adding flexible hours, or connecting them with resources.

    Create a virtual support system. The best leaders create virtual connections to alleviate feelings of isolation for employees working from home. A sense of community is an important component of mental and emotional well-being, and connection helps reinforce a spirit of belonging and mutual support among employees.

    Lead by example. Make sure you’re fostering healthy behaviors not only with your words but also through your actions. Don’t tell people to be maintain a good work–life balance and then stay logged in late into the evening yourself. Employees look to their leaders to set the tone, so be the example you want others to follow.

    Advocating for mental health support in the workplace may seem like an insurmountable task, but it starts with small, intentional steps and a caring leader.

    Lead from within: Given that we spend half our waking hours working, it’s unsurprising that work is one of the most influential factors in our mental health. The best leaders understand this principle and address it.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Care for Your Employees’ Mental Health appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:39 on 2020/02/20 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Leader, , , , , ,   

    What to Do When Your Boss Is the Conflict 


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    I often get calls from HR managers about difficult leaders who need help, but one stands out in my memory. It was from the HR director of a pharmaceutical company, who said, “We have an executive who’s arrogant, angry and forceful all the time and he’s constantly causing conflict—he’s a menace to the organization.”

    My first common-sense question was “Why don’t you fire him?”

    “We can’t,” the HR director said. He’s brilliant, and he’s turned the company around. We need him.”

    And so a call was set up and I started to work with—as his colleagues called him—the leader from hell. The process I used with him followed five discrete steps:

    Developing a relationship. For weeks I worked on building a relationship with my new client. I asked about his family, his parents, his kids. I learned about where he grew up and went to school, his hobbies and his passions.

    Discovering the driver. Once we were comfortable together, I asked him one day, what drove him in his work. His answer was thoughtful and eloquent. He had planned to become a doctor but he couldn’t hack the pre-med academics, so he studied business with an aim of working for a pharmaceutical firm. He was still helping patients, still connected to his original goals, but in a way that better suited his aptitude.

    Understanding the issue. As I spent time with my client at work, I saw that he was generally calm but sometimes had outbursts with colleagues or direct reports, treating them curtly and almost abusively. When I asked him why he let his emotions get the best of him, he shrugged and said, “I don’t know, I get impatient.” Similarly, he couldn’t understand his co-workers’ responses: “Don’t they see I mean well? It’s just a moment of anger.”

    Teaching new skills. In leadership, as any other field, there are things you need to know that are never taught in school. For the next year, my client and I worked on the skills he needed to learn—what I called best practices. For the first time he had resources for regulating his emotions, which helped him feel empowered and in control—and better able to deal calmly with whatever was happening.

    Reconciliation. I had him call a meeting with his team where he acknowledged his past behavior, discussed the steps he had taken to improve, and explained that moving forward he would be asking for feedback and responses.

    The end result in this case was a good one, a perfect illustration of the adage “when you know better you do better.” In about a year, my client had become not only a good leader but a great one—a leader who leads from within.

    It isn’t always so smooth. And if the problem is someone in leadership above you, you really aren’t in a position to require coaching or remediation. But you can still follow some version of the steps outlined here: Work to understand what’s underlying the behavior, model positive skills, and communicate as best you can the consequences of the person’s behavior. If they refuse to show any sign of willingness to change, you have a problem, because destructive behavior can’t be tolerated. If you’re in senior management or HR, that may mean setting a disciplinary process into effect. If not, and if reporting the behavior doesn’t bring about change, it may mean looking for a new position in a less toxic environment.

    Lead from within: When a leader is causing conflict, you have to get to the underlying cause and turn it around if you can. If that effort fails, you have to make decisions that are aligned with your company’s values and your own.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post What to Do When Your Boss Is the Conflict appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:21 on 2019/06/27 Permalink
    Tags: , , Leader, , , , ,   

    6 Things Bad Managers Will Fear but Great Leader Will Do 


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    Recently one of my clients, a leader of his own company, saw that one of his teams was not as enthusiastic as they used to be about their work and things were starting to slack. The team’s manager just shrugged and said they were a lazy bunch. That’s when my client called me in to help.

    A recent survey sheds some light on employee dissatisfaction: 69 percent of the people surveyed said they would be more satisfied if their employers better utilized their skills and abilities, and 59 percent felt their company viewed profits or revenue as more important than how people are treated.

    What this survey illustrates so profoundly—and what I’ve found to be true with my client’s team and in other companies I work with—is that people most often lose their passion for work because of how they are treated.

    Here are the suggestions I made to my client:

    Cut back on bureaucracy. Sometimes people lose enthusiasm because they’re so caught up in processes and procedures that feel like they spend their days just feeding the bureaucracy. When you can free them from unnecessary tracking and authorizations, they have the time and energy to connect with the work you hired them to do. Let them know they can lead where they are, with maximum empowerment and minimal red tape.

    Treat everyone as an owner. When you get rid of bureaucracy, you have to replace it with something—and the ideal solution is an entrepreneurial culture, a workplace where people feel they have a say in what is happening now as well as future directions. Get people to start feeling and thinking like owners. Many of my client’s managers objected to this suggestion—they had a lot of investment in the bureaucratic model—but he moved forward anyway. He held a town hall meeting and told each of his employees how important they were to him and that from that point on they should think of themselves as owners. “If you were running this business, what would you do, what ideas would you have?” he asked them—and then let him know that he genuinely wanted to hear their answers.

    Make information fully transparent. One of the biggest complaints employees have is being in the dark with decisions being made behind closed doors. If you expect people to act like owners, they need full access to information, with a clear understanding of the big picture, strategic goals, changes of direction, and what’s going on in the minds of management. They need to be brought to the table for input and be included in important conversations; they need to be invited into meetings and decision-making discussions.

    Let their voices be counted. It’s one thing to say you can drive and make decisions, but it’s another to listen and hear what someone has to say. Great leaders should always grant people a place to express themselves, a way for their voices to be heard and their questions to be asked, and then—this is the tough part—seriously address the issues that they bring up. When you allow people’s voices to count, you increase trust and bring back enthusiasm and drive.

    Follow their lead. If a team member comes up with a great new idea, get behind it and help them find the right people with the right skills to make it happen. Guide them and assist them when they need it but let them lead their own initiative. They’ll learn planning, delegation and management, and you’ll have a more valuable employee.

    Reward effort as well as progress. Everyone wants to be recognized for the work they do. It doesn’t matter what step of the ladder they’re on. As leaders and owners, we sometimes forget to acknowledge the hard work and the long hours, but those are things we should never take for granted.

    Many managers feel threatened by an entrepreneurial culture because they feel their authority has been limited. But leaders with the courage to take the leap soon learn that the more you empower your people the more powerful things can happen.

    Lead from within: Fearful managers restrict power; bold leaders empower people whenever they can.


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 6 Things Bad Managers Will Fear but Great Leader Will Do appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:19 on 2019/03/19 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Leader, , , , , Workforce,   

    How to Attract and Keep the Workforce You Need 


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    Every organization wants a reputation as a great place to work. In many fields, the workplace has become a candidate’s market where the best people have their pick of jobs. And it’s not enough to attract and hire top people—you have to be able to retain them too.

    Being known as an organization where the best people want to work isn’t just an HR issue—it brings a serious competitive advantage when the best people want to be part of your team. But it doesn’t just happen by chance.

    As business consultant and leadership executive coach who has worked with thousands of companies around the world, I’m able to see firsthand which strategies are the most effective in attracting and keeping top talent. They fall into six critical areas:

    Great leadership. People are attracted to leaders who are inspirational, supportive and empowering. Supervisors and managers are sometimes unaware of the role their actions and decisions have on employee turnover, so manager training and leadership awareness are a must. Managers need the skills, the tools, the knowledge and the inspiration to keep employees engaged. When you get leadership right, you get the right people.

    Great jobs. Getting people to join your workforce won’t be a problem if the job is attractive and challenging. But to retain your best people, you have to provide room for advancement with a career path and meaningful professional development. If you fall short in this area, you’ll lose employees to organizations that do better—which in turn will harm your reputation with prospective employees.

    Great culture. People are more committed and engaged when they can contribute their talents and ideas. A sense of ownership and respect makes employees feel they can excel. Creating a culture that nourishes top talent, encouraging creativity and risk and avoiding petty rules, is among the best ways to keep and attract the best people.

    Great purpose. Millennial’s now entering the workforce need to understand the why, not just the what. They want to understand and connect with an organization’s mission; they want to know how their work benefits that mission. You need to make sure you have a clearly expressed mission that resonates with people, and an organization that lives out that mission with authenticity and consistency at every level.

    Great development. The best workplaces make training and development part of their culture. A solid professional development program is one of the best recruitment tools you can develop. The investment of time and money will yield massive dividends in workforce security and the resulting benefits.

    Great rewards. It goes without saying that your salary and benefits need to be competitive. Beyond that, you also need to make sure people feel appreciated and recognized for their efforts with external rewards like public recognition, bonuses and awards. Even more important is intrinsic motivation—feeling connected and valued, with autonomy and opportunity for development and growth.

    Even if you’re doing well right now in recruitment and retention, these issues are important enough to warrant a proactive approach. Make an assessment of your organization’s leadership, culture and practices that affect employees—and if you see an area that’s wanting, don’t wait to make it right.

    Lead from within: Being a good employer means staying aware of what it takes to attract and keep the talent that you have. Pay attention to what your people need so you can be responsive to what they want.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photo

    The post How to Attract and Keep the Workforce You Need appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:47 on 2018/09/04 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Leader, , , , , , , , ,   

    7 Ways to Be a More Effective Leader 


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    The business environment has never been more demanding than it is right now. Factors that would have been exceptional not long ago—global competition, turbulent markets, demanding shareholders and customers, and constantly changing technology—are an everyday fact of life.

    More than ever, successful organizations depend on the quality of their leadership. And successful leadership depends on broad-strokes preparation based on principles you can apply in any situation, however volatile.

    Here are some foundational principles that will make you a more effective leader:

    Be both flexible and resolute. To be an effective leader, you have to learn to balance being unbending and being adaptable. Great leaders know how to go with the flow without losing direction, moving their organization forward with resiliency and alertness.

    Delegate but don’t be demanding. Too many leaders feel they need to control every little thing. Allow others to do their job and do it well. When you delegate wisely and often, you’re developing leadership skills, confidence and trust within your team.

    Set direction but make it compelling. Every employee needs some degree of direction. Set specific and measurable goals with your employees, then regularly monitor their progress against their own goals as well as their contribution toward organizational goals.

    Communicate with honesty and clarity. Many leaders don’t communicate clearly enough or often enough. Make the effort to inform, report, and communicate concisely so people are free to work without information gaps.

    Be accessible and available. At its core, your leadership is all about your people. When someone needs you, it’s time to look up, make eye contact, set aside your work and your phone and any other distractions, and focus on the person standing in front of you.

    Don’t just solve problems, create lasting solutions. There will always be problems, and there will always be a need for leaders who can create timely solutions that endure. Too many leaders settle for quick fixes that often cause bigger problems down the road. Focus on healing the cause of the problem instead of treating the symptoms.

    Consistently recognize the achievements of others.  Every employee wants to do a good job. And when they do, they want recognition from their leader. The simple act of recognizing and rewarding employees for a job well done is enough to set you apart as a leader.

    Lead From Within: If you want to grow into a truly effective leader, start today to cultivate these skills. Then, when the time comes, you’ll be prepared to steer your company and people in the right direction.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post 7 Ways to Be a More Effective Leader appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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