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  • feedwordpress 09:00:03 on 2019/11/05 Permalink
    Tags: , Chanage Management, , Integrity, , , , ,   

    A Change Leader Must Do These 4 Things to Be Successful 


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    Study after study states that a change leader has a critical role in determining the success of change programs undertaken by organizations, among the different expectations from leaders in supporting change, they have found there are four elements that change leaders have to deliver to their people for change to be successful:

    The element of confidence: Change is not only inevitable, for businesses, it’s mandatory. because if organizations fail to improve continuously, they ultimately encounter serious performance gaps relative to more adaptive competitors, and to stay competitive it needs confidence, a confident leader, who is confident in their vision, strategy, and it in this self-assurance it gives those they lead the confidence to implement the change, without confidence, people would not only doubt their leader but they would doubt themselves.

    The element of clarity: To be a successful change leader, you need to tell your people the reason behind the change, which means outlining the details and scope and timelines.  Because people will first want to know how change will impact them. therefore, the best leaders go great lengths to explain the rationale behind change in the manner that can be understood by those they lead.

    The element of communication: Communication is key when you want to implement change. You cannot over-communicate when you are asking your people or organization to change. Every successful leader who has led a successful change management effort expresses the need for over-communicating during a change experience. Change initiatives often fail due to lack of good communication. Communication is paramount when it comes to change management.

    The element of consistency: when it comes to being successful in change management a leader must be extremely vigilant with those they lead, and reassure their people that during the transition times there will be alignment between what they hear and what they witness. this is where the element of consistency is the professed and enacted behavior by the leaders in the context of change. To what extent, leaders are seen as binding their own behaviors to the new norms visibly surrendering some of the hereto decision making flexibility.

    Change has a bad reputation in our society. But change isn’t all bad – not by any means. In fact, change is necessary to keep us moving, to keep us growing, and to keep us developing.

    Lead from within: Change is never easy for anyone, but if you have confidence, clarity communication and consistency it can help leaders be successful within their initiatives and those they lead.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post A Change Leader Must Do These 4 Things to Be Successful appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:02 on 2019/10/31 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Integrity, , , , , , , ,   

    12 Phrases That Will Help You Resolve Any Conflict   


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    Conflicts are an inevitable part of any workplace and a constant source of stress for many leaders. Conflict resolution is an important skill for any leader to master.

    Like many other challenges, conflicts can actually present opportunities for positive change. Effective conflict resolution can build deeper relationships and foster more effective communication.

    One of the issues many leaders face in conflict resolution is simply knowing what to say. Here are some effective phrases that I have coached my clients to use in times of conflict. Try them out the next time you’re faced with a conflict:

    I sense that you’re feeling emotional about this topic. Is that right? Sometimes to break tension you need to label the emotion. Never ignore emotions, because they will only escalate. Labeling acknowledges what the person feels without judgment, helping them feel recognized and acknowledged and decreasing their tension.

    Let’s take a breather before we think this through. Sometimes the best thing to do is to take a break. The word breather is deliberate—giving pause to the situation and giving everyone involved a chance to take a few deep breaths.

    Thank you for your candor—I appreciate your feedback. Most people who tell the truth don’t receive appreciation. The best way to resolve conflict is to remain open to all feedback, because resolution requires that people tell it like it is.

    I recognize your efforts and hard work. Most people are appreciated only for results, not for the effort that they put in—especially if that effort was part of something unsuccessful. If you appreciate someone’s effort you are telling them they are valuable even if they haven’t succeeded. Helping people feel appreciated and valued can establish a positive connection and help open up common ground.

    Let’s work on this problem and fix it together. This phrase is important because instead of placing people on opposite sides of the conflict, you are signaling partnership. It shows that you care not just about resolving the current conflict but also about building and maintaining a spirit of collaboration.

    Tell me more—I want to understand. Most people speak to be heard, but few take the time to understand. This phrase is powerful because everyone wants to be understood. It doesn’t mean you have to agree, just that you are willing to hear them out.

    Let’s see what we can do to make sure it doesn’t happen again. When you express concern for the work without placing blame, you shift the discussion from a defensive back-and-forth to a prevention-focused exploration.

    What can we do to change the situation? The important word in this phrase is we—it’s not about what you can do or what you can tell them to do. Using we signals collaboration instead of hierarchy and problem-solving instead of finger-pointing.

    Yes, you’re completely right. If you are miles apart, find something you can agree on together so you can start the conversation with this phrase. When people feel heard and validated, they’re more likely to engage in a constructive dialogue.

    I wasn’t aware of this—tell me more. Stating your ignorance is sometimes a good place to begin defusing a situation. Stop talking and really listen; let the other person know that you are interested in what they are saying. Keep asking questions and listening empathetically until you get to the root of the conflict.

    I am with you on that. It can be hard to hear yourself being blamed, but your willingness to be held accountable can work wonders. If you let people know you are with them, you can not only resolve the current situation more readily but also avoid future confrontations.

    How can I support you? This phrase is one that every leader should use over and over and over again—in conflict, in dialogue, in conversation, in all communication. It eases stress, defuses conflicts and sets a positive tone for relationships.

    One of the biggest mistakes leaders can make is trying to avoid conflict. Dealt with the right way conflict can be a force for positive change. It opens the channel to better communication and stronger relationships.

    Lead from within: The bottom line is that conflict will always exist, but a satisfactory resolution and positive outcomes are within your power.

     


     

    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

     

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 12 Phrases That Will Help You Resolve Any Conflict   appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:52 on 2019/10/24 Permalink
    Tags: , , Integrity, Lack of Confidence, , , , , ,   

    This is What Happens When Your Leadership Lacks Confidence 


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    Confidence is one of the most important leadership skills you can have—but it isn’t always easy to come by. Confidence is grounded in your perception of your own abilities and how you come across to others. If you’re constantly comparing yourself to others and feeling that you’re coming up short—not smart enough, not successful enough, not advancing quickly enough—you can quickly spiral into self-doubt. Here are some of the insights I’ve discovered about confidence in my many years as a leadership coach:

    Confidence is not just one thing. Confidence covers a range of perceptions, attitudes and feelings, and labeling yourself as lacking confidence is an unhelpful generalization. At any moment we’re almost all very confident in some respects and unconfident in others. Get to know the entire profile of your confidence and the things that influence it from day to day.

    Appearances can be misleading. Many people who appear to have a great deal of confidence actually have no more than the rest of us. The difference is this: they know that they might make a mistake, get something wrong, or put their foot in their mouth, but they keep those possibilities in perspective and know that it’s not life or death. Most people feel less confident than they look, and remembering this can help you navigate your own moments of unconfidence.

    Confidence comes from doing things well. Before you can do anything well, you have to learn how to do it badly. Confidence comes from practicing your capabilities and competencies. Once you know that you can start something and improve on it through practice, you’ll feel less anxious about taking on new roles and skills.

    People take you at your own estimation. Ask yourself what habits you have that may signal to others know how you feel about yourself. Even if you think you’re hiding your thoughts, people will pick up on your level of confidence and adjust their expectations to match. True confidence is hard to fake—you need to develop it as something you feel and know about yourself.

    When a leader lacks confidence, the consequences affect the entire team. Unconfident leaders withhold information, postpone important decisions, and have trouble building teams and inspiring them. Without confidence, there is no leadership—because what you don’t have, you cannot give to others.

    Leadership can be difficult—at times it’s just about impossible to navigate—and if you don’t have confidence in yourself, your team isn’t going to have confidence in you or in themselves. Cultivating your own confidence is one of the best things you can do for yourself and your team.

    Lead from within: If you want to generate self-confidence, learn more about what causes you to have lack confidence. It is only then that you can build your self-esteem.


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post This is What Happens When Your Leadership Lacks Confidence appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 04:40:39 on 2019/04/25 Permalink
    Tags: , , Insecurity, Integrity, , , , ,   

    10 Signs You May be an Insecure Leader (and How to Be More Confident ) 


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    At some point in our lives and our leadership, we all experience insecurity. And when we act out of that insecurity we tend to behave badly, sometimes harming our relationships and reputation in the process. Especially for leaders, insecurity affects not only ourselves but also those around us.

    Because when an insecure leader thinks everything is about them as a result, every action, every choice, ever decision is put through the filter of their own self-centeredness, which doesn’t really serve others well.

    Here are 10 of the top signals that insecurity may be damaging your leadership. If any of these sound familiar, stop the behavior and work through the issues before major consequences result.

    You become defensive when challenged. When an insecure leader feels they’re being challenged or confronted, their first response is to feel they’re in the wrong—and to avoid that discord they quickly become defensive. Learn to welcome direct, honest communication even if it’s not what you want to hear; make peace with the fact that you will sometimes get it wrong.

    You micromanage. Insecure leaders like to control everything, even how other people do their work. They feel the more control they have the less likely they’ll be faced with a better way. Instead, give autonomy to your team and allow them to show off their talents and strengths.

    You’re not interested in feedback. Insecure leaders get annoyed when their team members or colleagues want to give them feedback. They see it as a confrontation and respond with fear and dismissal. Become familiar enough with your own strengths and weaknesses to take criticism in stride.

    You refuse to explain your decisions. Insecure leaders fear that the rationale for their decision may not hold up well, so they communicate decisions with no underlying explanation. Explain your decisions and the reasons behind your thinking so others can understand and trust your choices.  

    You stop listening to other people’s opinions. Insecure leaders see asking questions, seeking advice and listening to the opinions of others as a sign of weakness. They don’t want to be perceived as needing help. Emulate confident leaders by being willing to listen and learn from the opinions of others. In time you’ll realize that it’s actually a sign of strength.

    You always have to have final word. Insecure leaders need to be seen as always winning—even in an honest difference between two sound opinions. Learn to value the thoughts of others, especially in areas you need to know more about.

    You get angry when a team members resigns. Insecure leaders see any departure as a reflection on their leadership, so they respond in anger and focus on the faults of the person who’s leaving. When you lose a valued team member, take stock and ask yourself whether there’s anything you should do differently to keep your best people happy and productive.

    You blame others. When things go wrong, an insecure leader will never take responsibility but will always blame others first so they can avoid thinking about the possibility that they did something wrong or made a bad decision. Work to be secure enough in your leadership to say, “I messed up—let’s go make it better now.”

    You take credit for your team’s achievements. Insecure leaders like to take credit for other people’s work—not because it makes them feel better, but because it makes them seem indispensable and helps ease their fears of being unnecessary or unworthy. Emulate the great leaders who know success takes a team, and be quick to praise and recognize the achievements of others. (By the way, that’s also the best way to make yourself look good.)

    You don’t promote or develop your best people. Insecure leaders want to protect themselves at all costs, and they see the smartest and highest-achieving people around them as threats. They hand out titles only to those they believe will never question their authority or outshine them. As a leader, the best success you can achieve is the success of your people.

    We all have moments of insecurity. But if any of these descriptions sounds like you, you need to act quickly to change directions. If you can’t do it on your own, recruit the help of a coach or mentor—someone who can help you become more confident in who you are. Left unchecked, your insecurities will affect not only you but also everyone you lead.

    Lead from within: An insecure leader must become big enough to admit their mistakes, smart enough to correct them and strong enough to embrace them.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 10 Signs You May be an Insecure Leader (and How to Be More Confident ) appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:46 on 2019/02/05 Permalink
    Tags: Integrity, , , , , , , ,   

    10 Things Successful Leaders Never Tolerate 


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    Successful leadership is the product of several factors. Skill and education play a part, but one of the most important hallmarks of great leaders is the standards they uphold. That means building good habits of action and thought, and drawing a firm line at things that are unacceptable. It’s about what they do, but it’s also about what they’ll never take part in or allow in their team.

    Here are some top examples:

    1. Inertia. The reality of leadership is this that yesterday’s results become today’s status quo. Leaders need to constantly be moving forward and prepared to seize opportunities. Inaction is incompatible with strong leadership.

    2. Poor communication. The best leaders put communication at the heart of their leadership. Their communication is timely, clear, and appropriate, and they expect the same of those around them—because communication is a two-way street.

    3. Mediocrity. Successful leaders are ordinary people who aspire to the extraordinary. They’re constantly looking to break through expectations—their own and other people’s—and they’re never interested in hearing “good enough.”

    4. Ambivalence. Successful leaders don’t have the time or patience for indecision. They understand that to achieve success, you must put aside fear and doubt, pick a course and stick to it. Their decisions are grounded in knowledge and strategic thought, but they don’t waffle or create subcommittees to examine every detail first.

    5. Toxic relationships. Successful leaders don’t waste their valuable time and energy on negative relationships. They set boundaries, distance themselves from negativity and redirect their focus firmly on the positive. Positivity is fuel for progress.

    6. Dishonesty. Successful leaders understand that dishonesty destroys reputations and, ultimately, success. If you can’t be counted on to be honest, what kind of leader are you?

    7. Disrespect. Successful leaders treat every person they encounter with respect. They earn respect, in part, because of their willingness to show respect to others, and they don’t allow anyone around them to be treated disrespectfully or to be disrespectful.

    8. Fear. Leaders are human, and no one is without fear. But the best leaders understand that to succeed, they must tackle their fears and move through them to succeed. They feel their fear and keep going.

    9. Negativity. Successful leaders avoid negativity because they know it can only hold them back. Nothing good comes from being negative; negativity only breeds more negativity.

    10. Lack of integrity. Successful leaders understand the importance of integrity. Anyone around them who lacks integrity compromises their work, their team and their leadership. They lead with character in everything they do, and they expect others to do the same.

    There are many more things successful leaders don’t tolerate—this list is just a few of the most important. Let it remind you to keep your tolerance low when it comes to compromising who you are and who you can become.

    Lead from within: To build a successful career and life as a leader, know where you draw the line on anything that can harm your leadership and your team.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photos

    The post 10 Things Successful Leaders Never Tolerate appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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