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  • feedwordpress 08:00:16 on 2019/09/19 Permalink
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    7 Important Habits of Leaders Who Know How to Listen 


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    Great leaders must be effective communicators. That means they have to know how to speak and write clearly—and it also means they also have to know how to listen. Most of us don’t think of listening as a communication skill, but it’s one of the most important. The best leaders are skilled at listening—here’s how they do it:

    They listen with full attention. Most people like to speak, but it’s far more rewarding to listen with your full attention. You retain more, and people talk more—because the sincerest form of respect is actually listening to what another has to say.

    They listen to learn. In most exchanges, people simply react to the latest comment — a logical and often effective approach. But the best leaders are listening to learn. They don’t track conversations as a back-and-forth but as a path to new information. Listening, learning and putting into practice what you’ve learned will always be the best way to build success.

    They listen to understand. Most people listen with the intent to reply in the front of their mind. But true leaders know that in order to empathize and connect with others, you have to first understand them, and that understanding comes from good listening.

    They listen without interrupting. Most leaders have a genuine desire to be helpful, so it’s always tempting to chime in when someone’s speaking. But when you jump in to be helpful, you’re actually robbing them of the chance to fully express themselves and solve the problem on their own. Instead of rushing to respond when someone else speaks, try to zero in on what they’re actually saying. You can always offer help later if it’s still needed.

    They listen to form connections. The best listeners have developed their ability to hear and form connections—and then articulate the connecting points. When you listen and you are able to form connections with what is being spoken, you’ll find you’re well prepared to help people put their thoughts in context and decide what to do next.

    They listen without needing to reply. If you want to be known as a great communicator, you have to learn how to listen without thinking about your reply. As the old saying goes, we have two ears and one tongue. Focus entirely on understanding what’s being said.

    They listen to silence. Sometimes the most important thing in communication is hearing what isn’t said. Listen for awkward pauses, omissions, hesitation. When you do, you’ll become aware of things you haven’t heard before..

    The most successful people I know are the ones who do more listening than talking. Great communication is more about hearing others than it is about being heard yourself.

    Lead from within: When you really listen well, you’ll be able to engage more deeply with your team, colleagues and customers, and that is the sign of great leadership.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 7 Important Habits of Leaders Who Know How to Listen appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:49 on 2019/09/12 Permalink
    Tags: , , HR, , , , , ,   

    Things Every Courageous Leader Knows (That Most Ignore) 


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    Courage is a trait that seems to be in short supply these days, in leadership and elsewhere. People are looking for the kind of bold confident leaders we’ve seen throughout history—leaders who spoke up and stepped forward, who took the risks of true leadership when radical change was required.

    Whether you’re in politics, business, education, or any other field, at the top of the ladder or working your way up, you will encounter situations that demand your courage. It won’t be easy. Courageous leadership requires strong principles and tremendous tenacity.

    If you have what it takes to be a courageous leader, here are the things you need to do:

    Confront reality head on. Take off your rose-colored glasses and face what is actually going on. Get the facts, because only when you know what really happening can you lead the situation into a more successful, effective place.

    Allow for failure. Courageous leadership is open to bold new ideas—which means you have to allow for mistakes. The road to success is almost always paved with failures, so allow yourself to fail—and encourage your team to fail as well—so you can learn and grow from the experience.

    Say what needs to be said. I cannot tell you how many times I’ve heard someone say, “I wish I had the courage to say what I want to say.” I always respond by saying, “Give it a try.” Be bold and say what needs to be said.

    Encourage people to think for themselves. Many leaders have good ideas and enjoy sharing their wisdom with others, but it’s the courageous leader who encourages people to think for themselves and who listens to their thoughts.

    Hold yourself accountable. Let people know they can count on you. Accountability means you take on responsibility, deliver on commitments, and own up to your own mistakes and limits. When you hold yourself accountable, you model that behavior to those around you and help establish a culture where it’s the norm.

    Make decisions and move forward. Far too many environments foster a fearful approach to making decisions, but nothing great ever came out of fear. Express courageous leadership by encouraging decisive action that keeps things moving forward. Avoid the “paralysis of analysis.”

    Stay on course even when it gets tough. Especially if you’re taking bold actions and encouraging risks, you’ll eventually bump into the challenges of tough situations. When you fall, get back up. When you fail, try again. Tenacity is a huge component of courage.

    Give credit to those who deserve it. Be the courageous leader who isn’t fearful to take less of the credit and give the lion’s share to those who deserve it.

    If it’s your wish to be a leader who wants to change the world, leave a mark, make a difference, you need to start now to mold yourself into a courageous leader. Find and nurture the qualities that make you brave and bold. Courage isn’t inborn; it’s learned.

    Lead from within: The natural response when people say we need a courageous leader is to run from the notion, but life’s greatest leaps occur when we resist the impulse to run.


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Things Every Courageous Leader Knows (That Most Ignore) appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:16 on 2019/09/05 Permalink
    Tags: , , HR, , , , , , , , ,   

    10 Phrases That Will Help You Handle a Micromanaging Boss  


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    If your boss is a micromanager—the kind who wants to maintain as much control over you as they can—you know how frustrating and irritating it is. It’s possible, though, to take back some control—and these phrases can help you make that happen. Use them to start an effective dialogue that can result in more autonomy and less micromanagement:

    I’m going to do everything in my power to make you look good. If you tell your boss you want to make them look good, there is no reason for them to hound you. Accustomed to resistance, most micromanagers will be glad to hear something positive.

    Your success is important to me. Feed the ego of your micromanager and let them know their success matters to you. Their controlling tendencies are likely to ease if they believe your mind is on them—as they want it to be.

    Tell me how you like the work to be done. You may be able to circumvent a hovering micromanager by getting all the information up front. It will help you do the job you are supposed to do while also meeting their expectations.

    I will do an excellent job for you. When you reassure a micromanager about the quality of your work and show them that excellence is important to you, you may be able to put their perfectionist mind at peace.

    I know you want to help me succeed. Disarming a micromanager is important, and labeling their negative action into something positive may have them agreeing with you. Thank them and let them know you appreciate their investment. The recognition will make them feel good about themselves and it may help them give you some peace.

    I value your guidance. This is another way of disarming the micromanager with a positive twist. If you acknowledge their counsel, you may be able to persuade them that you will come to them when you need them.

    You sometimes know things about the situation that I don’t. This phrase feeds the micromanager’s ego and lets them know that you acknowledge their higher position and that you’ll check in when you need to know more.

    All the hovering, adjustments and changes are affecting my productivity. If nothing else is getting through, tell the truth and be straightforward. Leaders are measured by how much their team achieves. They know that productivity issues reflect poorly on them.

    I am going to show you how I do it on my own. Give the micromanager a rest by walking them through your own processes, showing them your competence and care.

    I am always open to your feedback. Holding yourself open for your micromanager to teach, guide, and mentor can help keep your work relationship on the plane where it belongs.

    A leader who’s constantly looking over their employees’ shoulders can inspire a lot of second-guessing and paranoia, and ultimately ends up running away their most talented people. To stop the micromanager—or at least get them out of your hair—try each of these approaches in turn until the situation is under control.

    Lead From Within: Most people don’t take well to being micromanaged because it leads to a loss of control and autonomy. But there are steps you can take before you decide to leave.


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 10 Phrases That Will Help You Handle a Micromanaging Boss  appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:53 on 2019/08/13 Permalink
    Tags: , , HR, , , , , , ,   

    How to Build a Team That Resolves Conflict Effectively 


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    Many leaders make the mistake of thinking they have to resolve every conflict—especially those that affect their team. But the best leaders know that is not the case, they learn to empower their employees by guiding them, giving them the resources they need and incentivizing them to work things out on their own.

    Here are six simple techniques to foster healthy conflict resolution within your office:

    Lead by example. It’s one thing to tell your team what they need to do, and another to hold yourself accountable for your own actions. However you’re personally dealing with conflict, those who report to you will likely follow your lead. To set a good example, pay attention to each person’s perspective, practice good listening skills, accept constructive feedback, and try to create an inclusive environment where differences are respected and honored.

    Coach your team. Every team has conflict—that’s just the norm—but it’s the leader who can coach their team through times of conflict who makes the biggest difference. The best leaders give their employees tools and techniques for mediation and conflict resolution.

    Establish ground rules. Every team needs to know the standards under which they will operate and collaborate. When you equip people with clear expectations and processes, they always know how to respond appropriately.

    Give regular feedback. An annual performance review isn’t nearly enough to prevent and resolve conflict. It is far more effective to have regular feedback sessions with your immediate team. These meetings can help cultivate an atmosphere of open and honest communication, and they present a good opportunity to deal with any misunderstandings or divisive issues before they get out of hand.

    Incentivize your employees. The best way to instill a new practice and keep it going is to provide incentives. They can take many forms—coaching, training, feedback, evaluations, or reward systems. Every leader needs to look at their team and organization and decide what works best for their culture.

    Celebrate successes. When team members successfully resolve internal conflicts, it should be celebrated and acknowledged. An appreciation of successful resolution will help build morale and encourage people to continue following core values and meeting high standards.

    Building a strong effective team that takes conflict in stride starts with leading by example and builds with good coaching, guidance and support.

    Lead from within: Conflict is inevitable. It is leading by example and coaching your team that you can best help them learn to resolve conflicts effectively and efficiently.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Build a Team That Resolves Conflict Effectively appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:34 on 2019/08/08 Permalink
    Tags: , HR, , , , , , ,   

    5 Ways Smart People Sabotage Their Success 


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    Most of us believe that smart people are automatically successful, but that’s not always the case. Intelligent people may have an advantage out of the gate, but a surprising number end up sabotaging their own success. Here are five of the top reasons why:

    They think they know it all. When people genuinely believe they know everything they need to know, there’s no reason for them to work to develop, grow or evolve. It’s easy for them to become stuck in their ways, and over time they grow rusty and fall behind on new developments in their field.

    They feel entitled. Those who think they deserve special privileges and treatment often already have a significant advantage—whether it’s intelligence, wealth or social status. Entitled people tend to sit back and wait for success to come to them instead of putting in the hard work it takes to get there.

    They aren’t willing to take risks. Sometimes smart people rely on their intelligence and avoid risk at all costs—and as a result they miss out on a lot of great opportunities. Big rewards often require big risks, and those who aren’t willing to roll the dice have a much harder time moving past the middle of the pack.

    They overthink. The smarter you are, the more likely you are to overprepare and overanalyze. Of course it’s good to be thoughtful, but overthinking doesn’t just create a problem—it creates a problem were there wasn’t one before. There’s no bigger enemy to opportunity than the paralysis brought about by overthinking. It’s a surefire way for smart people to sabotage their own success.

    They lack emotional intelligence. People with high intelligence sometimes see other skills as less important. They rely on their IQ instead of working on their EQ, and they’re often painfully unaware of what’s happening around them and how their demeanor may be affecting the situation. People who grasp concepts quickly and demand high standards are especially prone to creating difficulties when they interact with others. Sometimes smart people rely so much on their intelligence that they miss out on the nuances of a situation where they could have been successful.

    Intelligence is a great gift. But at times it seduces smart people into thinking they’re destined to succeed when that’s not the reality. No matter how smart you are or what other gifts you’re blessed with, make sure you stay connected to reality and work to maintain balance in your attitudes and approach to leadership and work—and life.

    Lead from within: Smart people sabotage their own success all the time without even being aware they are doing it.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 5 Ways Smart People Sabotage Their Success appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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