Tagged: HR Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • feedwordpress 08:00:36 on 2019/04/23 Permalink
    Tags: , HR, , , , , ,   

    7 Things Every Leader Needs to Quit Doing Immediately 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    Coaching as many leaders as I have, there are patterns that emerge—and there are times it’s apparent, from the perspective of an outsider, that certain actions are not going to lead to the desired results.

    I consider it part of my job to help leaders avoid unnecessary struggle. It’s in that spirit that I present some things you need to quit doing immediately—not because I say so but because they will not serve you in the way you think they will.

    If you’d rather learn these lessons the hard way, that’s your right. But for those who are open to advice from someone who’s witnessed a lot of leadership situations, good and bad, here’s the list of things you need to quit doing (or avoid starting):

    Comparing your success to that of others. Your leadership will never be like anyone else’s, and your journey is all your own. You will likely be successful in ways other leaders aren’t and you will fail as others might not. The goal of your leadership should be to be the best leader you can be, and the only accurate way to measure your success is against your own ideals and self-awareness.

    Running from your problems. If you can’t face your own problems head on, you can’t lead others in their own struggles. To be a great leader, you must first build understanding by struggling with your own problems and issues. That experience is what will ultimately shape you into the leader you were meant to become.

    Trying to be popular. If you want to be popular, you cannot be a leader. If you want to be a leader, you have to be willing to do the hard work, have the difficult conversations and take the major risks that make it all but impossible to be popular. Leadership can be risky at times—be prepared.

    Being indecisive about what you want. You can never leave where you are until you decide where you would rather be. Decisiveness is everything when it comes to being successful in leadership. Make a decision about what you want, then pursue it with passion and determination.

    Pretending you have all the answers. It’s important to remember that you don’t have to know everything. The sooner you admit you don’t have all the answers, the quicker those around you will be willing to help you fill in the gaps.

    Going it alone. Leadership can be lonely, but it doesn’t mean you have to lead alone. The best leaders surround themselves with people who hold them accountable for their actions and help strengthen their character. If you have a tendency to isolate yourself, make it a practice to connect with others who will support you.

    Trying to be everything to everyone. One of the greatest challenges of leadership is wanting to always do more. But trying to be everything to everyone is impossible and will just burn you out. Don’t allow yourself to flounder in the weeds trying to meet everyone’s expectations. Instead, believe in yourself and in others, and help inspire people to work toward their own priorities.

    Lead from within: There are many lessons to be learned in leadership. Whenever possible, try to avoid learning them the hard way and quit them before they stop you.

     

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 7 Things Every Leader Needs to Quit Doing Immediately appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:55 on 2019/04/09 Permalink
    Tags: HR, , , , , , Transition,   

    How to Successfully Transition to a New Leadership Role  


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    If you’re making the transition to a new leadership role, whether it’s in the same organization or somewhere new, it’s a challenging and important moment in your professional life. Your actions in the first few weeks of a new role can determine the success or failure of your tenure.

    It’s an unfortunate truth that nearly half of leadership transitions fail. Studies show that anywhere between 27 and 46 percent of executive transitions are regarded as failures after two years.

    What can you do to ensure that your transition is successful out of the gate and that you stay on the right side of that statistic? Here are some key points:

    Don’t move too quickly. Leaders who have been successful in a previous leadership role sometimes make the mistake of wanting to change the culture and immediately fix everything that it isn’t working. You may think you need to move quickly to make things happen, but that’s far from what will make you successful. Instead, you must be deliberate and thoughtful about any changes you implement. Fast moves and new initiatives are likely to have a negative impact, which reflects badly on you. To be successful in transition, learn to move slowly.

    Make sure you’re prepared. A recent study finds that as many as 83 percent of global leaders in a new role say they are unprepared. Leaders often think that what got them there is going to keep them there. But a leader in a new position has to prepare for transition by with the knowledge that they don’t know everything. They have to lead with an inquisitive mind to figure out what skills, learning or development they need, then go out and cultivate them. To be successful in transition, learn to assess.

    Become an effective collaborator. As you’re developing new initiatives, consider it an opportunity to model a collaborative approach. Don’t hand down edicts but help your team take on sponsorship of the initiative. Lead them in strategizing, optimizing and working on integration with all the aspects of the business. Allow them to be the architects of the plan to make sure everyone can buy into the idea. Together you will go much farther than any leader can go alone. To be successful in transition, learn to share ownership.

    Build a comprehensive view. Before you take any broad action, make sure you have a good sense of the five basic dimensions of leadership—the strategy and operation of the business or function, the corporate culture, the team, the leader themselves, and other stakeholders that need to be managed—and how they work together in the current context. For transformational change to be successful you need a leader who can fluently switch between the big picture and a more detailed view. To be successful in transition, know when to act.

    Transitions are a great opportunity to build a foundation for long-term success—both your own and the organization’s—but they need to be carried out slowly and deliberately.

    Lead from within: The most successful transitional leaders must first go inward before they can be effective leading outwardly.

     


    N A T I O N A L B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photo

    The post How to Successfully Transition to a New Leadership Role  appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:54 on 2019/04/04 Permalink
    Tags: , , HR, , , , , , , Team,   

    12 Stupid Things to Stop Saying to Your Team Immediately 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    We all have our leadership blind spots, and sometimes even the most intelligent leaders say things that are—well, just stupid. And then they’re surprised when, predictably, they get the opposite effect of what they want.

    Here are the 12 stupidest things you can say to your team, but they must be stopped immediately.

    “Do it my way.” If you hire a group of talented individuals to use their skills and expertise to do a job, then tell them to do it exactly the way you would do it, you’re bound to alienate and disempower them.

    “That will never happen.” Using the word never closes a door, and it makes you sound unprofessional and limited. Nothing is impossible—there are always opportunities and options.

    “Do you know what I mean?” It’s always important to make sure you’re connecting with people and that everyone’s on the same page, but you need to find a way to do so that isn’t condescending and annoying.

    “It’s none of your business.” Anything that pertains to the project or the team is everyone’s business.

    “That was my idea.” If you’re caught up who gets credit, you’re not concentrating on what’s important. As a team, you do things together to accomplish great things. Focusing on individuals—especially yourself—is inappropriate on a team project where the goal is a collective accomplishment and result.

    “You’re doing it wrong.” There are many ways to tell people they seem to be moving off track. It’s important to remember that people do things in different ways, so they may just be taking a different approach. If you think someone is in error, enter into a dialogue instead of making pronouncements.

    “Before you say that, let me tell you . . . ” Why would you want to shut people down or tell them not to speak? Communication is key to great teamwork, and you want to encourage people to express themselves. Listen before you speak.

    “I already knew that.” Even if it’s true, listen again. Maybe this time you’ll learn something new.

    “Because I said so.” This phrase, the hallmark of halfhearted parenting, will make people roll their eyes and lose all respect for your leadership.

    “You must have misunderstood.” Sometimes people do misunderstand, but it’s unprofessional and disrespectful to assume that a miscommunication was entirely the other person’s fault. You don’t want to make people feel they’re not smart enough to understand what you want from them.

    “What’s in it for me?” This phrase shouldn’t even be in a leader’s vocabulary. What’s in it for us? is more like it. A team is a collective, and what happens to one happens to all.

    “I’m the boss.” They know you’re the boss. And you wouldn’t have to remind them if you acted like their boss—by letting them do their job, empowering them, supporting them, and helping them develop.

    Lead from within: We have all said stupid things without being aware of them. When you’re in a leadership position, it’s especially important to think before you speak.

     

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 12 Stupid Things to Stop Saying to Your Team Immediately appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:32 on 2019/04/04 Permalink
    Tags: , HR, , , , Onboarding, , ,   

    4 Mistakes Leaders Need to Avoid When Being Onboarded 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    Having coached many CEOs and senior executives through onboarding processes, I know how important the early days are—and how much can go wrong. Most of the serious missteps I’ve seen have happened because the person coming on wasn’t given all the information they needed to be successful.

    When you come into a new role, you have a unique opportunity to showcase who you are as a leader. While you’re doing so, make sure you tread somewhat carefully until you’re able to figure out the things you’re not being told. Here are some tips for the balancing act of onboarding:

    First, listen. It is a natural inclination to start a new position by showing how qualified you are. But remember, that’s not the most significant aspect of your leadership. Far more important is taking the time to listen before you take action. Ask questions and learn; there will be time for action, but the early days and weeks should be about taking it all in and getting a feel for the big picture by tapping into numerous perspectives.

    Don’t rush the changes. We all want to leave our mark, and especially if you’ve seen evidence of problems it’s tempting to come in and start showing others how you can make things work better. Disruption is fine—it may even be part of what you were hired to do—but you have to start by giving the people you’re disrupting a chance to buy in to your leadership. Even if you feel you’re making a slow start, it will even out quickly once you have some momentum.

    Keep it humble. Don’t feel that you need to show off all your accomplishments, experience, intelligence and capability right off the bat. Instead, demonstrate your humility and look to see where those around you shine. As an incoming leader you have only a small window to give a good first impression of your character, so use it wisely.

    Keep communication open. One of the most important things you can do in your first days is to establish an open line of communication and let people know you are here to listen and support. Especially if you’re coming on after a crisis or a leadership failure within the organization, employees may have a low level of trust. Make it your responsibility to initiate conversations, to earn trust, and to establish a tone of transparency and frequent honest communication.

    Onboarding is challenging, and sometimes it can leave you feeling that you’re surrounded by blind spots and opportunities for mistakes. But if you stay aware of the areas where mistakes are most likely to happen, if you make use of every opportunity to learn from others and stay focused on the people you’re serving, you can position yourself for long-term success in your new role and any future ones.

    Lead from within: Onboarding in new position can be extremely difficult, but if you are aware of the most likely errors you can avoid those mistakes.

     

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 4 Mistakes Leaders Need to Avoid When Being Onboarded appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:29 on 2019/04/02 Permalink
    Tags: 90 Day Plan, HR, , , , , ,   

    How To Make Your Last 90 Days At A Job As Meaningful As The First 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    We hear and read a lot about the first 90 days of a leader’s tenure—all the things you should and shouldn’t do.

    We know those 90 days are important because they set the stage and determine people’s perceptions of their new leader. We know too that the best way to start a new leadership position is not to be reactive and immediately make massive changes but to take your time and focus on serving and empowering others.

    The same is true for a leader who’s departing. The last 90 days are just as important as the first; how you leave is just as important as how you come in. Just as you wanted to make a good impression at the beginning, you want to leave with the respect and goodwill of your former colleagues.

    It starts with thinking about your departure from your team’s point of view. Feeling left behind creates a reaction that can be surprisingly strong.

    Here are some thoughts on easing the transition for those around you and securing a good legacy for yourself:

    Keep lines of communication open. In stressful times, communicating with honesty, integrity and transparency is critically important. Keep the focus on the team, assigning new roles where you can and making sure systems are in good shape so things can function well without you. Remember that the first response of many on your team will be to wonder What will happen to me now? and make sure your actions, as well as your words, are reassuring.

    Speed things up instead of slowing them down. Many leaders think of a transition as a time when things should slow down and decisions be delayed, but this is actually the perfect time to rev things up. Give people reason to stay engaged with their goals, to remember where they’re going and how they’re going to get there. Send a clear message that leaders are important but those who implement strategy and work toward attaining the goals are more important. Any organization’s greatest asset is the people who get the job done; leaders come and go, but the people who make it work are essential. Make sure you’re setting up the people you leave behind for success.

    Prepare your team not for loss but for big gains. Satoru Iwata was a Japanese video game programmer and the fourth president and CEO of Nintendo. He is widely regarded as a major contributor in broadening the appeal of video games, and he led Nintendo through one of the most successful periods in its history. When he died, most people thought the company would go under. Instead, his employees honored their beloved leader by growing the company. Their shared goals were focused not on loss but on moving forward and working to keep his legacy alive.

    It’s about empowerment, not ego. At the organizational level, your departure is not about you. Most people have only a superficial interest in why you’re leaving or what your departure means to you—they’re concerned primarily with their own feelings and a possibly uncertain future. But the best kind of leadership—in any season, not just during transitional times—happens when the leader focuses on empowering their team instead of personal issues. In the words of Lao Tzu, “A leader is best when people barely know he exists. When his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: we did it ourselves.”

    As a coach of executive leaders around the world, I know that the last weeks a leader spends at an organization are incredibly important. If you want to leave those around you better than when you came, make sure your actions are focused on empowering them. When people feel their own inner power, in spite of the sadness and difficulty of a leader’s departure, they can still maintain the energy to move forward.

    Lead from within: Whatever the stage in your relationship with your organization, give your best and be aware of the likely effects of your actions.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L    B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photo

    The post How To Make Your Last 90 Days At A Job As Meaningful As The First appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
esc
cancel