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  • feedwordpress 08:00:42 on 2019/03/21 Permalink
    Tags: , HR, , , , , ,   

    When it Comes to Leadership, This is What Really Matters 


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    When I first started out as an executive leadership coach, not many CEOs saw the importance of leadership coaching or development. Over the past few years attitudes have changed, and recent research finds that 90 percent of CEOs are planning to increase their investment in leadership development and see it as the most important human capital issue their organizations face.

    Identifying and developing great leaders is a critical factor in organizational health, which in turn drives shareholder returns. But what direction should that development take? I think it’s important to focus on the fundamentals—the most critical traits and skills leaders need to be successful. Here are some of the most important:

    Emotional intelligence. Any successful leader must have a healthy dose of emotional intelligence. Leaders with good EI know how to identify and manage emotions—their own as well as those of others. They practice awareness and empathy, and stay connected with their own feelings and in control of situations. Understanding emotional intelligence and developing the EI of your organization’s leaders is a great investment.

    Effective problem solving. Knowing how to solve problems is one thing, but knowing how to solve them effectively is far more valuable. To be an effective problem solver requires the ability to discover key information, the knowledge to conduct a detailed analysis, and a willingness to consider all solutions. It’s a key skill, not just in high-stakes situations but every day, and it’s surprisingly difficult to get it right. Successful leaders have just as many problems as others, but they know how to solve them more effectively.

    A willingness to consider the opinions of others. Most leaders think they need to have all the answers to be successful, but that’s as far from the truth as you can get. Successful leadership means being able to listen to the ideas, viewpoints and positions of others. Leaders who do well on this dimension typically base their decisions on sound analysis and input from the right people; they avoid biases and premature conclusions.

    The ability to achieve results. Great leadership is not only about developing and communicating a vision and setting objectives but also about following through to achieve results. Leaders who focus on results tend to emphasize the importance of efficiency, productivity and accountability, resulting in a process that naturally prioritizes the highest-value work.

    Being able to be supportive. A successful leader is supportive of those they lead by showing up with authenticity and a sincere interest. They build trust and help people overcome challenges. They manage group work in a way that promotes efficiency, and they never forget that the role of leadership is not to develop followers but to develop new leaders.

    The power to motivate and inspire. Part of great leadership is developing strategies that reenergize people’s attitudes about the organization and their role within it. Research shows that leaders who can reenergize their employees tend to have a workforce that’s truly engaged, with higher levels of employee retention and productivity. And because motivation and inspiration mean different things to different people, the most successful leaders in this area start by knowing their people well enough to understand what works for them.

    These are far from the only traits a good leader needs, but they’re among those with the highest return on investment. Keep them in mind as you plan your leadership development program.

    Lead from within: For organizations investing in development of their future leaders, prioritizing the most important areas ensures the highest level of success.

     


    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photo

    The post When it Comes to Leadership, This is What Really Matters appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:13 on 2019/03/14 Permalink
    Tags: , , , HR, , , , , ,   

    How to Work with a Leader Who Lacks Emotional Intelligence 


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    Many experts believe that a person’s emotional intelligence quotient, or EQ, may be more important than IQ. The ability to perceive and manage emotions certainly seems to be a better predictor of success, quality of relationships, and overall happiness.

    Low emotional intelligence has demonstrated negative effects in the workplace; it lowers morale and reduces productivity.

    When leaders exhibit low EQ, the effects are especially pronounced. A study by Pearson and Porath of thousands of managers and employees found strong repercussions when a leader engages in negative behavior:

    • Two-thirds of employees said their performance declined
    • Four out of five employees lost work time worrying about an unpleasant incident
    • 63 percent wasted time trying to avoid the offender
    • More than 75 percent said their commitment to their employer had waned
    • 12 percent resigned due to the leader’s behavior

    Unfortunately, many leaders still lack emotional intelligence. But there are strategies that can help when you encounter a leader with low EQ. Here are five of the most fundamental ways to help improve the situation:

    Acknowledge them. Leaders have a lot on their plate; they are juggling more than one responsibility at a time. The best way to work with a busy leader who lacks emotional intelligence is to acknowledge their emotions and frustrations, to let them know you see their challenges and hardships. Let them learn how it feels to be acknowledged. In South Africa, when you greet someone you say “Ubuntu,” which translates as “I see you.” See your leader and their struggles.

    Serve them. Leaders serve others, so even if you feel they don’t need your help, it can be beneficial to let them be on the receiving end of service. Give respectful feedback without criticism. Help them understand the importance of emotional intelligence and the benefits of cultivating related skills, for the benefit of not only the leader but also the team and the entire organization.

    Calm them. A big component of emotional intelligence is the ability to manage emotions and triggers. If your leader has a low EQ, it may fall to you  to calm them down and model for them how emotionally intelligent people are able to regulate and control their emotions.

    Appreciate them. It’s hard for a leader not to notice when people on their team are appreciative and thoughtful. It not only makes them feel good but also sets the tone for the way people speak to each other and behave toward each other. Consideration, compassion and understanding are important elements to demonstrate.

    Lead them. Be the example you want to see in your team and your company. Watch your own emotions and your own triggers—be the person who understands how your emotions impact others and recognize the role you may have played in creating difficult circumstances. At the end of the day you become the leader who illustrating to others what it’s like embodies emotional intelligence.

    At the end of the day, the best way to help those who lack emotional intelligence is to lead by example in acknowledging them, serving them, calming them, and caring for them. Show them what is like to have EI within yourself and how they too can begin to embody those skills to benefit themselves and those around them.

    Emotional intelligence is essential in the workplace. Don’t tolerate a lack of it.

    Lead from Within: Whether you’re a leader now or may become one in the future, cultivating emotional intelligence will not only serve you but also help you outlast and outperform.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Work with a Leader Who Lacks Emotional Intelligence appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:30 on 2019/03/11 Permalink
    Tags: HR, , , , , , ,   

    This is the Best Way to Manage Your Team 


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    In business, today we seem to focus more on the exciting parts of our work—innovation and creativity—and less on the day-to-day requirements of leadership. It’s great when you have an organization that’s all about speed, agility, innovation, and creative thought, but it’s your job as the leader to make sure that people understand the vision, that the work’s getting done, that the necessary results are being achieved. Without leadership, you won’t have coherence or consistency—or success.

    A great leader needs an extensive set of skills, from planning and delegation to communication and motivation. It’s tempting to focus your growth and development on the areas where you’re already comfortable or those that offer the most excitement. But for long-term success, it’s wise to analyze your skills across the board and challenge yourself to improve in every area.

    Here are some of the most important everyday things you can do to lead your team well:

    Maintain good communication. As a leader, you have to keep everyone informed about projects, goals, and deadlines, so it’s essential that you communicate well. When you are open with your team they’ll be open with you, creating opportunity for dialogues, feedback, and any questions or issues they want to address (and shutting down gossip and rumor mills in the process).

    Build meaningful relationships. Get to know members of your team individually—personally as well as professionally. When you put the effort in to get to know a bit more about the people you work with, and you better understand who they are and what they do, everyone works more productively and effectively.

    Delegate effectively. Delegation is key to great leadership. People perform better and are more engaged in their roles and responsibilities when they feel their skills and talents are recognized and put to use, and when you know the strengths and goals of each person it becomes easier to delegate strategically. The benefits are twofold: Your team members grow and learn under your supervision, and you can achieve much more.

    Manage conflict. When there is conflict—and there is always conflict—make sure not to ignore it but to address it and manage it. Turning a blind eye or hoping it goes away on its own can lead to a negative atmosphere, which in turn can affect the whole team and ripple out into the organization. It is crucial to address and manage conflicts in way that people feel understood and know that a solution can be reached.

    Be decisive. To lead a team well you have to be decisive, willing to hold strong opinions along with an open mind. Decisiveness doesn’t mean you aren’t open to learning but that you have a clear vision and can translate it into bottom-line decisions. Strong decision making that aligns with your organization’s values and the needs of your team brings great results.

    Appreciate hard work. Don’t be one of these leaders who doesn’t respect effort or who thinks hard work is just the minimum that people should do. Express appreciation for effort and hard work and do it often, because those who feel recognized and valued will continue to work harder than those who don’t. Appreciation builds confidence and engagement.

    Lead by example. People look up to leaders. They are constantly watching you and seeking your guidance, support and coaching, so it’s imperative that you set a good example, Whatever expectations you have of others, set the example yourself. Act in the ways you want others to emulate.

    Lead from within: There are many ways to manage a team, but to lead a team takes range of specific skills that are practiced and repeated daily.


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photo

    The post This is the Best Way to Manage Your Team appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:56 on 2019/03/07 Permalink
    Tags: , HR, King Of Scotland, , , Leadership Lesson, , , , Spider, , ,   

    A Big Leadership Lesson from a Small Spider 


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    There’s a story about Robert the Bruce (Robert I), a 14th-century king of Scotland. As he was struggling to protect his kingdom against the English, he found himself driven from his castle and forced to flee to keep from being taken prisoner. Feeling completely defeated and at a loss about what to do next, he took refuge in a cave.

    Soon he spotted a small spider spinning its web. He watched as the spider would spin and then stop, spin and stop. Each time it didn’t make a move for a long while, he thought it had given up and failed in its task. But each time it eventually started again, moving with slow determination. And in time, after many stops and starts, it completed its web.

    The king reflected on the three characteristics that made the spider successful—patience, awareness, and determination—and set out to apply them to his own situation.

    To gain patience, he cleared and sat quietly until he found himself calming down and collecting his composure.

    To cultivate awareness, he thought about the situation he was in and what it would take for him to survive in the short term and continue ruling his country. This awareness not only calmed him down but also allowed him to see things in a new way, removing some of the darkness he’d been under.

    To embody determination, he thought about coming out of the cave ready to fight and do whatever it would take to regain his kingdom.

    The king left the cave with patience, awareness and determination. The fight was long and difficult, with its own starts and stops, but within a few years Scotland prevailed and gained its independence.

    That little spider, gone for centuries, changed the course of history. And we can still apply its lessons today.

    When you find yourself in a challenging situation, ask yourself how you can attain patience. It is patience—with yourself, with your circumstances, and with your thinking—that will give you the wisdom to find new solutions to old problems.

    When you feel everything is conspiring against you, ask yourself what awareness you need to cultivate. Awareness can help you understand that even when you cannot change a situation, you can always change yourself. Developing the ability to tolerate negative circumstances will make you rethink who you are as a leader.

    When you want to give up, ask yourself how you can dig a little bit deeper to find your determination. Great leadership comes from embodying grit, using your inner strength to persist, not allowing any setbacks to stop you from moving toward your mission.

    Leadership lessons are all around us. If a king can learn the most important lesson of his life from a spider, how much can we learn from the people, the things and the opportunities we experience every day if we stay open and pay attention?

    Lead from within: Some of your most valuable leadership lessons will come from unexpected sources. What will you take away?

     


    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    Photo Credit: iStock Photo

    The post A Big Leadership Lesson from a Small Spider appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:12 on 2019/02/28 Permalink
    Tags: , HR, , , , , ,   

    5 Important Things Most Leaders Are in Denial About 


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    Leaders are a diverse group, but they do share some common traits. For example, there’s something in the nature of virtually every leader—whether it originates in pride, a primal need for power, a desire for control, or an obsession with success— that causes them to be in denial about certain types of things.

    Once you know what to look for, you’ll be better prepared to make sure you stay connected with reality. Here are five of the top topics that leaders are in denial about:

    1. Self-awareness. Many of the leaders I coach assure me that they have more than enough self-awareness. It’s a statement that almost always is grounded in denial. It’s not that people want to fool themselves, but it can be genuinely hard to look in the mirror and see the truth about yourself. Most leaders are inaccurate in assessing their own strengths and weaknesses.

    2. Communication skills. Many leaders think they’re great communicators, not realizing that they may be communicating only in one direction. Some pride themselves on being approachable and accessible, but they never really hear what others are saying. Some fail to set goals or provide context for the things they ask people to do, and others never offer feedback, leaving people wondering what they need to do to be successful. Communication is imperative for good leadership, so if there are gaps in your skills you need to know about them so you know where to improve.

    3. Autonomy. The biggest mistake many leaders make, especially if they’ve worked their way up through the ranks, is failing to make the mental shift from being a doer to being a leader. As a result, they refuse to let the members of their do their job, and end up micromanaging to the point of frustrating their most talented people. An important part of a leader’s success rests in giving people the freedom to do their jobs.

    4. Connection with their team. Most leaders know almost nothing about what their employees want, for the simple reason that they never take the time to ask. Employees quit because they see greener pastures in another workplace. That’s typically because  of a leadership failure, and it happens more often than you’d think.

    5. Mistakes. Successful leaders own their mistakes—they take responsibility, they learn from their missteps and move forward. Leaders in denial, however, put more energy into hiding their mistakes than it would take to own up to their responsibility and explore ways to make things right.

    Leaders who choose to live in denial are likely doomed to fail. Think of these symptoms as warning signs, indicators that you may not be adequately attuned to the reality of their leadership. It’s well worth your time to take a second look or even to compare your perceptions with those of a trusted advisor.

    Lead from within: More leaders would learn from their mistakes if they weren’t so busy denying them.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photos

    The post 5 Important Things Most Leaders Are in Denial About appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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