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  • feedwordpress 08:00:50 on 2020/10/13 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Disengaged Leader, HR, , , , , , ,   

    How to Work With A Leader Who is Disengaged 


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    A disengaged employee may be unproductive and ineffective, but a disengaged leader can do real damage. Those who work with disengaged leaders often feel disappointed and frustrated, even if they’re otherwise satisfied with their jobs.

    So how can you do your best when you’re working for a disengaged leader?

    First, it’s important to try and understand the origin of the disengagement in the leader’s situation and perspective. That means putting yourself in their shoes for a time. Many disengaged leaders fall into one of a few categories, and the best response for each is a bit different:

    They’re responding to an external issue. If it’s a recent development, especially if it was also sudden, it may be related to something situational, like an illness or family crisis. Ongoing disengagement is a different issue and may be related to an issue like substance abuse or long-term stress. Ask others about their perceptions, being clear that you’re coming from a place of concern, not a desire to gossip or denigrate. Many leaders are unwilling to talk about a personal issue with a subordinate, but you can still demonstrate a spirit of caring. If you’re in a position to do so, make sure that everyone on your team—including your leader—has access to information on mental health resources.

    They simply don’t know how to engage. Your leader may just be an introvert or someone for whom engagement doesn’t come naturally. The best way to engage an awkward leader is by taking the initiative. You may be able to open the door a bit, and by modeling engagement you set a good example for the leader and for your coworkers.

    They’re focused on the strategic side of leadership. Your leader may be drawn to the strategic elements of their position—things like decision-making and crafting policy—rather than directly managing people, and they avoid the part of their job that they consider too draining. Engage this type of leader with small interactions instead of long exchanges to show them that being with people doesn’t have to be overwhelming.

    They’re self-centered. Ego-driven leaders rarely look beyond their own needs and interests. If it’s not about them, they’re not interested. They’re among the most frustrating leaders to work with for a number of reasons, but it may be possible to exert a positive influence on them if their indifference and sense of entitlement aren’t already too ingrained. You may need to feed their ego to get anything accomplished, but you can help compensate for their shortcomings and set a good example for others by making sure you’re quick to give credit and encourage others.

    A disengaged leader is a serious problem. And like any serious problem, it requires careful assessment and an action plan.

    Lead from within: If you’re working with a leader who is disengaged, try to engage them. Speak from the heart and show them what true engagement feels and sounds like.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Work With A Leader Who is Disengaged appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:01 on 2020/10/08 Permalink
    Tags: , , , HR, , , , , , ,   

    How to Boost Your Leadership Emotional Intelligence 


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    Many competencies play a role in great leadership, but the most critical is probably emotional intelligence—the ability to identify and manage your own emotions and to understand the emotions of others. Many, many studies have demonstrated the power and importance of emotional intelligence, and if you’re a leader or aspiring leader and you haven’t already done so, you need to begin working now to understand and develop it. Here are the basics:

    Cultivate self- awareness. Before you can lead others, you must know and understand yourself. The image you have of yourself is likely different from what others see, so the  best way to achieve a realistic self-awareness is to work with a trusted advisor, coach or mentor. Once you better understand your strengths and weaknesses, you can begin to consider your responses in different situations more clearly.

    Manage self-regulation. Every leader should be capable of regulating their emotions. That means not verbally attacking others when you’re upset, not making rushed or emotional decisions when you’re stressed, not stereotyping others when you’re outside your comfort zone, and not compromising your values under pressure. Self-regulation is all about holding yourself accountable and staying calm—behavior that inspires others to do the same.

    Develop inner motivation. Everyone needs to be self-motivating, but it’s even more important for leaders. Self-motivation means you’re aware of your goals and working with them consistently in mind. It instills high standards and integrity, and it offers encouragement by helping you find positivity in the face of challenges and even failures.

    Embody empathy and humility. We live in a world that rewards people for hiding their insecurities, but it’s much more important to hide your sense of self-importance. That means letting go of your pride, picking and choosing battles, and looking for opportunities to listen to others. It means recognizing others for who they are, and—even when you feel you’re right and they’re wrong—it means listening and finding understanding in disagreement.

    Acquire social skills. I am a big believer that leaders who work on their own self-awareness, managing their emotions and embodying empathy have an easier time developing the understanding and connection that make social interactions naturally gracious. Leaders with well-developed social skills appreciate others and communicate effectively, and they’re comfortable being supportive and reassuring. Working on your emotional intelligence and developing yourself as a leader gives you the tools to build great relationships with those around you.

    Bottom line, emotional intelligence is the ability to sense, understand, and effectively apply the power and acumen of emotions as a source of human energy, information, connection, and influence.

    If you’re a leader but you haven’t developed self-awareness or the ability to manage your emotions, you’re constantly at the mercy of how you feel. And if you lack empathy and social skills, you aren’t likely to get far as a leader—no matter how smart you are.

    Lead from within: Great leaders work on cultivating their own emotional intelligence as well as that of those they lead so together they can succeed.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Boost Your Leadership Emotional Intelligence appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:29 on 2020/10/06 Permalink
    Tags: , , , HR, , , Leadership Styles, , , ,   

    What is the Best Leadership Style That Outlasts All Trends 


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    As a leadership coach I’m often asked about trends in the field—which styles are current and which are growing outdated. But I don’t see leadership as a conflict between established and emerging styles but as a range of styles, old merging with new.

    At their core, I believe, most leaders are working to achieve the same things—empowering their people and building strong teams. And the leadership style that outlasts all trends, as it turns out, is a shifting balance between polarities. Here are some of the most important:

    A leader must be both a decisive planner and a creative visionary. We all know the importance of planning and decision-making in effective leadership. Stability and consistency are important to organizations. But we also need leaders who are thinking far ahead, creative visionaries who help us see what the future can be. Great leadership embodies both.

    A leader must make decisions with conviction and also be agile and flexible toward change. When we think of great leadership, we often think of someone who makes decisions with consistency and clarity. Important as that ability may be, great leaders must also be able to navigate fast-changing situations in which decisions often need to be reconsidered—and sometimes changed.

    A leader must be an expert and keep a learner’s mind. We expect leaders to know their subject matter thoroughly, to be professional and masterful at what they do, to ask the right questions and know the right answers. But leaders also need to the ability to say, “Wait, I know a lot but I’m also here to learn.” A willingness to keep learning is one of the most important traits of great leadership.

    A leader must be a great communicator and an even better listener. Leaders are called to be great communicators. We expect them to be clear and succinct, to say what they mean and mean what they say, to speak and write with clarity and purpose. But a great leader needs to know not only how to express themselves but also how to listen—an essential skill that few people bother to master.

    A leader must be both powerful and humble. Leaders need to acknowledge the power they hold by leading from the top, taking decisive action and inspiring and guiding others while being present in the day-to-day realities. But with that power should come humility and humbleness, qualities that make people feel included and considered.

    The best leadership, then, isn’t drawn from any single theory or trend but comes from learning to balance a set of constantly changing polarities. If you want to be the best leader, to embody the kind of leadership that inspires people to do their best work and seek out your support and guidance, you must be attuned in the moment. That kind of leadership will ask different things of you at different times.

    Lead from within: The leaders who are the most successful and effective are those who can recognize and balance shifting polarities of all leadership styles.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post What is the Best Leadership Style That Outlasts All Trends appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:02 on 2020/09/15 Permalink
    Tags: , , , HR, , , , , Remote Working, ,   

    How to Collaborate Effectively with a Remote Team 


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    Many of us are missing the days when collaboration was as easy as stopping by someone’s office or arranging a face-to-face team meeting. Effective collaboration can still happen in the remote workplace, but it means cultivating a different set of skills and attitudes.

    Here are some of the foundational elements for successfully collaborating as your team works remotely.

    Shift the mindset. In the early days of the pandemic, working from home felt like a novelty—a quick solution for a few weeks until things got back to normal. The perspective now is far different. Remote work looks to be a long-term reality for many of us. As leaders, we need to help people shift their mindset to consider the new possibilities for creativity and innovation that remote work brings instead of wishing they were back at the office.

    Understand the different types of distance people are experiencing. In addition to the constraints of physical distance, remote teams face operational distance, where different teams have different sizes, skill sets, and attitudes, and connection distance, where trust, empathy and listening are more important—and more challenging—than ever. Leaders who want to build a strong foundation for team performance should first focus on improving connection distance. Strengthened trust and communication, in turn, are the best way to overcome operational and physical distance.

    Ensure psychological safety. Remote communication blurs some of the nonverbal cues people rely on for a sense of safety and security, and as a result there’s a greater tendency for people to hold back. Leaders need to create an atmosphere of safety and mutual respect so people know their questions and thoughts are welcome and feel safe speaking their mind.

    Foster true diversity and inclusion. Great collaboration requires diverse viewpoints, and it’s easier for majority voices to dominate in online settings. Leaders need to make sure everyone is included—that diversity is genuinely built into the collaborative process and not a matter of token representation.

    Prioritize process and accountability. Clear and well-documented workflows and documentation are critical to the success of any remote team. Something I often suggest to my clients is creating and maintaining a team charter—a regularly updated document that identifies the team and its responsibilities, context and accountability; sets specific measurable goals; assigns roles and responsibilities; and outlines work processes, a communication plan, and structures for decision-making and conflict resolution. Such a document, accessible to all and updated as needed, can go a long way in keeping everyone collaborating successfully and in promoting accountability.

    Especially since the pandemic upended everyone’s work processes, a proliferation of systems, platforms, apps and gimmicks are all being marketed as helping teams collaborate effectively. Some of them may even be effective for your workplace. But before you dive in, remember that collaboration begins with people, and meaningful improvement won’t come from new technologies but from better connections and deeper relationships.

    Lead from within: For collaboration to be effective as we work remotely, leaders need to focus on connections, processes, and communication.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Collaborate Effectively with a Remote Team appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:02 on 2020/09/01 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , HR, , , , , Struggling, , , , ,   

    How To Manage An Underperformer Remotely 


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    Love it or hate it, working remotely is likely to remain a reality for some time to come. A fairly common challenge, now that people have had time to settle into new workflows, is that more employees may be struggling to keep up. How you handle that situation is important—to your employee, to you, and ultimately to your entire team. Here are some tips that have proven to be successful for preventing and dealing with underperformance:

    Set up clear expectations. Like many things, communicating expectations can be tricky when you’re unable to speak to people in person, so it’s important to be very clear and to make sure you’re understood. It’s helpful to not only list expectations but also prioritize them, and to connect them to the big picture by showing how they add value to your team’s and organization’s goals.

    Get to know people individually. Especially with people you’ve never worked with in person, make a real effort to get to know them and begin building a relationship. Find out what motivates and inspires them, who they are and where they’re from, what their home situation’s like, what they’re passionate about outside of work.

    Manage how you give feedback. When people are struggling brutal and direct feedback doesn’t work, and that’s even more true remotely. People become defensive or shut down, so the problem is still in place—and now the lines of communication are closed. Some better ways: relate and share (“Here are three things that really work for me in those situations”), question and analyze (“What was the thinking that led to that decision?”). Empower people` by allowing them to tell you what they’re struggling with instead of you telling them.

    Ask how you can support them. If you suspect an employee needs help, ask them directly, “How can I support you? What do you need?” And then listen to what they say. It may be as simple as “The time we meet is the worst time for me to be present” or as complex as “I don’t think I can get this done without some additional resources.” Let them know you understand and respect what they say, and then do what you can to help.

    Serve as a coach. When you help people learn for themselves, they grow and gain self-confidence. Switch hats sometimes and act as a coach—ask questions and guide them in finding their own way. Ask questions like “What did you learn?” and “How did things get better?”

    Stay connected. Even in the best of times, it can be hard to stay connected. And working remotely compounds the difficulty. Make it a priority, and keep a toolkit of simple ways to connect—a Zoom call, a quick text or email, even a handwritten note.

    It’s not easy to work with an employee who’s not performing well, especially when you can’t sit down face to face and talk from the heart. But using these specific road-tested techniques can help you strengthen others and  improve your leadership.

    Lead from within: Invest in your people as you invest in your organization. Let people know they matter to you, especially when they are struggling.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How To Manage An Underperformer Remotely appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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