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  • feedwordpress 08:00:33 on 2020/05/19 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Future of Work, HR, , , , , ,   

    How Great Leadership is Generated in Significant Crisis 


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    For years I have studied and observed great leadership, teaching and coaching leaders and organizations around the world on the qualities that make leaders effective. One thing I’ve learned through that experience: when crisis hits, the best leaders are ready to act courageously and boldly. Their leadership grows and deepens even through dark times because they hold close to the core principles of leadership:

    They think of others, not themselves. Many people are drawn to leadership because they want the titles and perks of a powerful position. In a time of crisis, those leaders generally find themselves facing an out-of-control disaster. Great leaders know that their power to steer through rough waters comes not from looking out for themselves but by putting the needs of their people first.

    They confront reality instead of hiding behind speculation. The best leaders assess the situation and get the facts they need at every step. Especially in situations where fear and change are the norm, they need to be able to instill confidence that their communications and decisions are based in reality.

    They say what needs to be said without hiding behind an agenda. When it’s time to communicate to their team or to the public, great leaders have the courage to be brutally transparent and honest. They refuse to hide behind an agenda; they’re not afraid to say what needs to be said, and they share the information they have wherever it might be useful.

    They assign tasks and implement purpose. The worst thing a leader can do in a crisis is to say, “Let’s wait and see.” That approach does nothing to ease fears or alleviate anxiety—and it ensures a complete lack of preparation, no matter what direction circumstances take. The best leaders take charge and act in the service of the company, the community, the people. They work to establish order and direction so people stay connected to a sense of purpose.

    They stay flexible and willing to learn. Everyday leadership is one thing, but navigating through a crisis requires a certain level of comfort with chaos and dizzying change. Great leaders understand that they will have to make adjustments on the fly to accommodate a rapidly changing situation. They learn from their mistakes so they can pivot quickly as circumstances change.

    They lift spirits when motivation is low. Great leaders make their people feel that even through the worst of times, they’re right there with them, working and caring. They encourage everyone to push forward, lifting spirits and keeping motivation high, They have a presence that tells everyone around them, “We can make it.”

    In times of crisis there are leaders who will fall back and fail to meet the challenge—but for those who are there for the right reason, difficult times can provide fuel to grow into greatness.

    Lead from within: In times of crisis there are leaders who will emerge to help us overcome our fears and anxiety. They will be a shining light in our dark moments.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How Great Leadership is Generated in Significant Crisis appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:34 on 2020/05/05 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , HR, , , , , , , , ,   

    The One Aspect Of Crisis Management That No One Talks About 


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    Some people are more suited to crisis leadership than others. Many hunker down and hope they make it through. Others are bold and dynamic, always driven to stay a step ahead of events.

    But throughout the spectrum, there is one aspect of crisis management that no one is talking about. Whatever your approach, you must stay aware of your people.

    What’s happening today is effecting every person on your team at a deep level. And if you want to stay successful as a leader, you need to address those changes.

    Here are some of the ways your people are likely reacting:

    Some go into deep into action mode. Many people think that if they stay busy and are in constant motion, they won’t have to address what is happening around them. So they go into action mode. Some of my clients are now working 16-hour days just to keep moving.

    Some are angry and don’t even know it. People may be feeling frustrated—about change, about uncertainty—unaware that underlying that frustration is anger. Anger happens when frustration isn’t being addressed. A massive crisis that changes nearly every aspect of life with no clear end in sight is a perfect example of a situation that can cause deep-seated anger.

    Many are mourning what used to be. People are likely to be mourning their old lives and wishing things could go back to what used to be. Some may be grieving for long-awaited events, family gatherings and celebrations that have been canceled. Others may have lost a friend or family member. When people are grieving, emotions such as guilt, despair, fear and anxiety are common.

    Most are reflecting on their lives. Crisis often triggers inner turmoil, because it takes away the noise of everyday distractions and gives people a clear look at their life from a new perspective. They may be asking themselves, Am I where I need to be? Is this what I thought I would become? Is this giving me the joy I was looking for? And the answers may change their future direction.

    If you aren’t recognizing what is happening to your people and communicating with empathy and understanding, you may be facing a bigger crisis within your organization than you realize. Leading in a crisis is not about just having an action plan and implementing it for success. It’s about acknowledging your people and accepting that they’re likely to be going through things that will take them some time, and maybe help, to work thorough.

    As a leadership coach, I have seen countless organizations in crisis, and I know the price of ignoring its human dimension. if you want to keep your most talented and capable people, address the issues they’re struggling with.

    Lead from within: Crisis management is not only about having a plan for the future; it is recognizing your people for who they are and what they need from you as a leader.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: istockphoto

    The post The One Aspect Of Crisis Management That No One Talks About appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:10 on 2020/04/23 Permalink
    Tags: , , HR, , , , , , ,   

    Why Its a Bad Idea to Hire Someone Like Yourself 


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    There’s a weakness shared by many leaders—one that spans cultures and industries—and most aren’t even aware that it’s a weakness. It’s this: in hiring, most leaders gravitate toward people they can relate to, people they can get along with and enjoy working with. While the results of such hires may not be disastrous, they fall short of being the best choice for you and your team.

    When you hire someone like you, you’re duplicating a skill set, a background or a perspective—or all three. You already have someone like you on your team; what you need is someone who can complement your strengths, not mirror them. The differences between people are a valuable asset, and the more diverse your team is—the more skills and perspectives you can bring to the table—the stronger it will be. Seek out a range of people, hire them and appreciate them for who they are and what they contribute.

    When you hire someone you like, you’re working from the wrong criteria. It’s great to enjoy the people you’re working with, but it’s far more important that they can stretch who you are and what you know. And sometimes the people who stretch us the most are those who can be frustrating and challenging. Don’t look for the most likeable candidate but the one who can bring the most to your team and your leadership.

    When you hire someone you get along with, you may be creating an echo chamber. It’s always a good experience when you have positive chemistry with a prospective hire—when something immediately clicks—but you may be surrounding yourself with people whose personalities are too similar to your own. While you don’t want to hire anyone toxic or exceptionally difficult, remember that some tension is necessary for developing great work. The right kind of tension means you and everyone on the team are challenged to be open to new ideas and to shift your way of thinking—and that’s a positive force.

    Making a bad hiring decision can be costly to your business and your leadership reputation. But bad hires are easier to avoid than the ones that aren’t terrible but also aren’t the best you could do. Filling positions with the right people is crucial to making your business and leadership work smoothly, so keep an open mind and remember the value of diversity when you’re tempted to hire someone who appeals to you on a personal level.

    Lead from within: If you keep hiring people like yourself, people you like, and people you get along with, you’re depriving yourself and your team of important opportunities for growth and achievement.

     

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Why Its a Bad Idea to Hire Someone Like Yourself appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:47 on 2020/04/14 Permalink
    Tags: , , HR, , , , , ,   

    How to Engage Employees During Uncertain Times 


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    When times are uncertain, people disengage. They’re distracted by anxiety and personal concerns, worried about the future, and less likely to view the work they’re doing as an important part of their life.

    Leaders need to know how to positively re-engage and refocus their people. In tough times employees look to their leaders even more than usual. Here are some ways to help them stay connected and engaged:

    Show emotional support. People who are feeling uncertain and anxious don’t want good intentions. They want emotional support and vulnerability, a sense of genuine caring and concern. The best leaders work hard to support the physical and psychological well-being of their people.

    Provide insight and communication. Especially in difficult times, employees want a leader who will communicate and provide clarity. At the core of leadership is the leader’s responsibility to calm people down and engage them in a way that provides comfort and assurance along with honesty.

    Foster a strong community culture. People often turn inward as they work to cope with stressful situations, but the resulting isolation makes the situation even worse. The cure for isolation and disengagement is community. Do everything you can to keep your team’s community and culture strong so no one feels they’re going through this alone.

    Minimize distractions. When your employees are anxious, when their work schedules change, when nothing is operating normally it’s easy for people to feel scattered and disengaged. That’s when the best leaders step up to help people focus by setting goals and maintaining accountability—while also remembering to keep expectations realistic.

    Remove financial burdens. As a leader it is important to emphasize to your employees that you are there to support them. If they need financial support to help them through, be creative in finding ways to provide it, and if money needs to come from somewhere, take it from the top. Recently the CEO of Southwest Airlines took a 10 percent pay cut to help their employees out.

    Make sure you’re ready for an economic downturn. I have seen unprepared companies get destroyed in downturns. Your best defense—aside from a stockpile of cash, if you’re lucky—is an engaged and determined team. Help them feel positive about their work and show them the gratitude they deserve for their critical role.

    Avoid layoffs at all costs. The last thing you should find yourself doing as a leader is laying off people. Review expenses and debt levels now, and commit to resourcefulness and creativity in leading your team and organization through what may be a lengthy recession. Workforce reductions should be the absolute last resort.

    The best message you can give your employees, in your words and your actions, is that you’ll all get through this together. Then do everything you can to keep your company and people engaged and productive.

    Lead from within: Great leaders know that managing uncertainty is a matter of putting themselves in the shoes of their employees and delivering the strong, compassionate leadership they expect.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Engage Employees During Uncertain Times appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:08 on 2020/04/09 Permalink
    Tags: , HR, , , , , ,   

    How to Lead in Times of Crisis 


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    Most leaders believe they’re prepared to lead through a crisis. But after working with hundreds of executives as a leadership coach, I’ve found that many of them don’t fully understand what crisis leadership entails. Faced with an actual crisis playing out in real time, it’s easy to become overwhelmed by uncertainty. Here are some touchstones to help you remember the things you need to do to maintain success—not only for yourself but also for those who are counting on you.

    Meet people where they are. Your first instinct may be to rush into action, but your first job in any crisis is to make sure your people feel safe. Once you’ve addressed that essential element, you can move on to the next steps.

    Look ahead, not just around. While you’re reacting to what’s happening in the moment, you also need to be thinking and projecting several steps ahead through every likely scenario. Especially if you can map what’s happening now against an earlier crisis, you can determine what you’re likely to encounter and be prepared to meet it.

    Expect frequent course corrections. In times of crisis things are always changing. Make a plan, but be prepared for course corrections along the way. Agility and flexibility make the best plans work, and the more perspectives you consider the better prepared you’ll be to adapt.

    Communicate continually. The worst thing you can do in a crisis is to leave your people in the dark. They need to trust that you’ll always let them know what’s going on, even if the news is bad or the answer is “I don’t know.”

    Set priorities. Even in the best of times, leaders have to balance urgent needs with longer-term but equally important tasks. In times of crisis, it’s more important than ever to determine what you need to deal with immediately, what can wait, and what you can delegate.

    Make sure you’re learning. There is nothing more important than learning from each crisis—examining what is working and what is not, and applying that as experience. If the past can’t teach you what you need to know, make sure you can apply what you learn along the way to the future.

     Aim for constant improvement. Every crisis is an opportunity to learn about the strengths and weaknesses of your leadership. Reflect on your initial responses to stress, your emotions and behaviors. As yourself how you can better handle the human dimensions of the crisis. Even in the most challenging situations, great leaders are constantly working to improve themselves.

    Elevate others. In stressful times it’s more important than ever to seek out ways to empower and inspire people. Put the well-being of your people before anything else. The way you treat them in a time of crisis will define much of your legacy as a leader.

    Lead from within: In a crisis, it’s not the command-and-control type of leader who is successful but the one who stands with their people.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Lead in Times of Crisis appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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