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  • feedwordpress 09:00:42 on 2018/11/12 Permalink
    Tags: , Dysfunction, HR, ,   

    10 Ways Disruption in the Workplace Turns into Dysfunction 

    Disruption is one of those buzzwords that suddenly started turning up everywhere. In its positive sense of shutting down the status quo and forcing us to look at our processes and values with fresh eyes, it’s a great concept to incorporate into any workplace. But when disruption creates chaos and low morale among your team, it’s taken a wrong turn.

    As a business consultant and executive leadership coach, I’ve seen the havoc that dysfunction can leave in its wake. If you see any of these behaviors creeping into your organization, treat them like an invasive species and do whatever it takes to wipe them out before they do lasting damage. Your team and your organization—and you—deserve better.

    Disrespect. You can’t force a person to show respect, but you can refuse to have an organization where people are disrespectful. Never allow anyone on your team to yell, scream, insult, mock, or cross other personal boundaries.

    Gossip. Nothing turns co-workers against each other faster than gossip. It’s one of the most destructive negative forces in any team, and it’s up to you to set a clear example to your team that it’s not acceptable.

    Undermining. When teammates start working against each other, your entire enterprise will suffer. Make sure your policies for things like raises and promotion don’t inadvertently pit people against each other.

    Negativity. Even one relentlessly negative person can pull down an entire team. Create a culture so overwhelmingly positive that there’s no room for negativity.

    Mistrust. Trust is the core of every great team. Treat it with the care and respect it deserves and never allow mistrust to take hold.

    Defensiveness. When people act defensive, it’s often a sign that they feel unsafe. Ask yourself—and your team—what’s going on to make people feel that way.

    Unaccountability. When you fail to hold people accountable, you fail to make them responsible. Build accountability into every position and project on your team so it’s not considered optional.

    Unproductivity. Getting things done is what being a team member is all about. When you have solid accountability in place, there won’t be any room for unproductivity.

    Deflection. If your people are unwilling to take responsibility for their mistakes and blame others, make sure you’re being sufficiently supportive of failure. When people feel secure in taking risks, there’s no need for them to blame others.

    Betrayal. An extreme form of dysfunction—if people on your team are experiencing betrayal, you have a lot of work to do.

    If any of these disruptions are happening in your organization more than occasionally, it’s likely a problem rooted in the culture. And because culture tends to happen from the top down, look inside your heart and ask yourself where you aren’t setting the example you’d like.

    Lead from within: If you want an organization where disruption doesn’t become dysfunction, you need healthy habits—and they must start from the top. Lead by example and let others know what is tolerated and what needs to be eliminated.

     


    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 10 Ways Disruption in the Workplace Turns into Dysfunction appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:20 on 2018/11/09 Permalink
    Tags: , HR, , , , ,   

    7 Easy Ways to Support Your Leader 

    When we speak about leadership, it’s not unusual to discuss the role of a leader in supporting others. But how often do we think about how we can support our leaders?

    Few people—if any—have it at the top of their mind, but it only makes sense. Success comes from partnership, collaboration and cooperation, so why should support be a one-way street? Maybe it’s time to start thinking about how you can support your boss, your manager, or your leader. Here are seven easy ways:

    Demonstrate loyalty. Loyalty is the ability to put others before yourself and stick with someone through good times and bad. Support your leader as a proud ambassador in public and a champion in private. Be willing to go to extraordinary lengths if necessary to help your leader succeed.

    Offer solutions. When things break down, focus on solutions instead of problems; help brainstorm ideas and analyze available options. Find out what went wrong and how to prevent it from happening again. Offer suggestions and, if appropriate, roll up your sleeves and help out.

    Make information available. Whatever your leader’s style of communication, it’s always best to establish and maintain an open line between you. That means you keep your boss involved and informed and protect them from being blindsided. Summarize complex issues and believe me, your leader will thank you.

    Take initiative. There are always numerous ways of going above and beyond at work. Look for challenges that stretch you and increase your competency. Try to anticipate what your boss might require or request and prepare it in advance.

    Be reliable. We usually make promises with the best intentions of keeping them, but sometimes due to either external circumstances or internal shortcomings, we end up not honoring those promises. If your boss knows you’re someone who can be counted on, you’ll not only be supporting them in an important way but also helping yourself stand out.

    Sweat the small stuff. Support your boss by getting ahead of deadlines. Don’t make them ever have to spend a moment reminding you of something or checking on your work. Simply doing your job consistently well turns out to be a huge help.

    Treat your boss with respect. Respect your boss’s time and avoid unnecessary interruptions. Respect at work fuels the interplay between your independence as a professional and a healthy interdependence with your boss—one where you rely on each other for success at work.

    Lead from within: You can’t achieve anything by yourself, and every leader needs a support system.


    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photo

    The post 7 Easy Ways to Support Your Leader appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:40 on 2018/11/06 Permalink
    Tags: , Decision Making, HR, , , , , ,   

    The Surprising Truth About Leadership 

    There’s a common thread in top leadership that surprises most people—and in some cases makes them rethink what they know about leadership.

    When you think of successful leaders you probably think of people who are decisive. The ability to make a decision quickly and without waffling is one of the keystones of leadership.

    But leaders change their minds every day, even at the risk of being branded indecisive or a waffler. Here’s the difference: They don’t back off a decision just because they have second thoughts. They understand when a change of plan is warranted. And sometimes they take decisive action by reversing their earlier decision.

    Here are some of the top circumstances when the best practice is to reconsider a decision:

    New information emerges. Sometimes new information shows up that changes the context of a decision entirely. It may be something that was impossible to foresee, or it may be something you or your team failed to pick up on. When that happens, don’t think in terms of blame but take the new information and integrate it into the decision-making process. Later you can revisit ways to make sure your research is thorough.

    The situation becomes unpredictable or unstable. In today’s uncertain marketplace and political climate, situations can go from stable to chaotic in the blink of an eye. When that happens, it’s wise to reassess decisions that are influenced by the instability and change position if need be. There’s no virtue in steadfastly sticking to a position when everything around you has changed.

    Feedback suggests it. A bold decision may be theoretically sound, but sometimes in the light of day it turns out to be unworkable in practice. If early feedback suggests that a plan isn’t working—for whatever reason—it’s wise to listen and make changes where necessary. Always listen to those who know best: those who are out in the field every day, whether team members or clients.

    It’s time to wait. Once you’re into the thick of something, the clear choice may be to do nothing at all for now. It’s not a matter of reversing a decision in this case, but of delaying its implementation until conditions improve or the surrounding issues become clearer. Despite the pressure leaders feel to be bold and act decisively, doing nothing is preferable to making a disastrous choice. If waiting can give you an edge, wait.

    Let’s honor those leaders who are forward-thinking enough to correct their course, pivot or wait even though they risk their reputations by having people think they are indecisive. Sometimes you need to change your mind, and that’s OK.

    Lead from within: Successful leaders are able to make shifts in their thinking because they never stop looking for ways to improve the end result.


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post The Surprising Truth About Leadership appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:18 on 2018/10/29 Permalink
    Tags: , HR, , , , , ,   

    6 Powerful Habits of The Most Productive Teams 

    Every team has its own habits, but some habits—like some teams—are more effective than others. Building and reinforcing good habits can be the key to a cohesive and productive team. Make sure your team is supported with habits that will take them from vision to goals to achievement. Here are some of the best:

    Keep the safety net strong. Productive teams are not scared of failing or messing up. They’re not afraid to take risks and be vulnerable with each other, because they have the security of knowing no one will fault them if things go sideways. The essence of a great productive team is the combination of accepting risk while insisting on excellence. Every team member wants to know: Can I take risks without feeling insecure or embarrassed?

    Create structure and clarity. The best teams assign each member a clear role with clear plans, guidelines and goals. They make sure that they’ve fit the best qualified person in each key role on the basis of background and personality, and they make sure everyone has the training they need to meet high expectations. The result is an impressive structure and clarity that make effectiveness almost a given.
    Every team member wants to know: Are goals, roles, and execution plans clear? Do I know what’s expected of me, is it a good fit, and do I have the training I need to do it well?

    Work at an optimal pace. It’s not about speed but finding the right pace. If your team moves too quickly, burnout will soon begin to set in; too slowly, and things become stagnant. Productive teams know they have to find the right balance as they continue to grow and achieve. The environment in which teams operate is more important than ever. Every team member wants to know: Do I have to work around the clock to look productive, or can I pace myself to bring out my best work?

    Foster accountability and responsibility. Teams fail when no one holds the members accountable for success. Very few people can continue to function well without a structure in place to ensure consistent progress. The best teams reach their full potential when they are able to be accountable for their work and responsible for their results. Every team member wants to know: Can we count on each other to do high-quality work on time?

    Keep the big picture in view. It’s great to get a talented group of people together to do something well, but that work gains true significance when they know it has impact, that it will make a difference and create change. That awareness is the difference between a good team and a great team. Every team member wants to know: Do we fundamentally believe that the work we’re doing matters?

    Lead from within: For teams to become more productive, they need to master productive habits.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photos

    The post 6 Powerful Habits of The Most Productive Teams appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:58 on 2018/10/25 Permalink
    Tags: , HR, , , , , ,   

    How to Deal with an Unprofessional Leader 

    Every workplace has at least one expectation in common: that employees at every level treat one another with respect and behave in a manner that reflects positively on the company. Leaders in particular are expected to set a good example, so it can be especially distressing when a leader behaves unprofessionally, engaging in harassment, bigotry or discrimination. Whether it’s a peer or your boss, there are things you can do to protect yourself from a leader who is unprofessional.

    A great deal depends on the setting in which you’re working. If you’re in a large enough organization, HR may have policies on dealing with harassment and other forms of misbehavior, and you should talk with them as a first step. In a smaller company, things may be more open-ended. The best response also depends on the specific behavior in light of professional standards—and even, in some cases, the law. But here are some general principles you can follow if you find yourself confronted with bad behavior on the part of a leader.

    See something, say something.  First and foremost, resolve to take action. As the saying goes, if you see something, say something. Don’t allow yourself to maintain denial or assume that the problem will go away in time—if anything, it’s likely to escalate.

    Have a teachable moment. If you’re comfortable doing so and it’s appropriate to the situation, explain to the person that what they’re saying or doing is offensive and inappropriate, and why. Occasionally people honestly aren’t aware. And in any event it’s an opportunity to communicate expectations clearly.

    Draw the line. Respectfully but firmly, let the person know unconditionally what you will and will not tolerate. Be crystal clear in your communication.

    Document everything. Document all unprofessional behavior, including the date and time and any witnesses. Also take notes of every meeting and conversation. They’ll give you added credibility if needed.

    Ask around. Quietly talk with other people in your workplace to find out whether any of them have experienced something similar. There’s strength in numbers.

    Enlist support. These situations can lead to long, drawn-out conflicts, so have plenty of emotional support lined up from friends and family.

    Lead from within: An unprofessional leader damages relationships, businesses and reputations, and tarnishes the trust of those they lead.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photo

    The post How to Deal with an Unprofessional Leader appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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