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  • feedwordpress 08:00:34 on 2020/05/05 Permalink
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    The One Aspect Of Crisis Management That No One Talks About 


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    Some people are more suited to crisis leadership than others. Many hunker down and hope they make it through. Others are bold and dynamic, always driven to stay a step ahead of events.

    But throughout the spectrum, there is one aspect of crisis management that no one is talking about. Whatever your approach, you must stay aware of your people.

    What’s happening today is effecting every person on your team at a deep level. And if you want to stay successful as a leader, you need to address those changes.

    Here are some of the ways your people are likely reacting:

    Some go into deep into action mode. Many people think that if they stay busy and are in constant motion, they won’t have to address what is happening around them. So they go into action mode. Some of my clients are now working 16-hour days just to keep moving.

    Some are angry and don’t even know it. People may be feeling frustrated—about change, about uncertainty—unaware that underlying that frustration is anger. Anger happens when frustration isn’t being addressed. A massive crisis that changes nearly every aspect of life with no clear end in sight is a perfect example of a situation that can cause deep-seated anger.

    Many are mourning what used to be. People are likely to be mourning their old lives and wishing things could go back to what used to be. Some may be grieving for long-awaited events, family gatherings and celebrations that have been canceled. Others may have lost a friend or family member. When people are grieving, emotions such as guilt, despair, fear and anxiety are common.

    Most are reflecting on their lives. Crisis often triggers inner turmoil, because it takes away the noise of everyday distractions and gives people a clear look at their life from a new perspective. They may be asking themselves, Am I where I need to be? Is this what I thought I would become? Is this giving me the joy I was looking for? And the answers may change their future direction.

    If you aren’t recognizing what is happening to your people and communicating with empathy and understanding, you may be facing a bigger crisis within your organization than you realize. Leading in a crisis is not about just having an action plan and implementing it for success. It’s about acknowledging your people and accepting that they’re likely to be going through things that will take them some time, and maybe help, to work thorough.

    As a leadership coach, I have seen countless organizations in crisis, and I know the price of ignoring its human dimension. if you want to keep your most talented and capable people, address the issues they’re struggling with.

    Lead from within: Crisis management is not only about having a plan for the future; it is recognizing your people for who they are and what they need from you as a leader.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: istockphoto

    The post The One Aspect Of Crisis Management That No One Talks About appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 05:00:04 on 2020/02/11 Permalink
    Tags: , , Goals and Success, , , , , ,   

    How the Best Leaders Manage Up Effectively 


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    Managing up—finding effective ways to work with those above you on the org chart—it is a skill that’s rarely taught, but it’s essential to leadership at every level. Whatever your position, whatever your aspirations, building appropriate relationships with your higher-ups is important to your success and advancement.

    The key is to develop the best possible understanding of your bosses’ quirks, preferences, priorities, work style, and communication style. Those insights will guide you in working with your bosses effectively and making a great impression. Here are some specifics to work on:

    Shift your mindset. The skills that have served you well in attaining a leadership position and managing a team need to be adapted for success in managing up. Prepare yourself to take on a new set of skills and align them with your goals.

    Build relationships. Take advantage of opportunities to meet and interact with your higher-ups, especially in informal settings away from the workplace—like receptions, fundraisers and athletic events. Getting to know your bosses and building a rapport in a relaxed environment is a great way to start building strong relationships.

    Rely on your competence. Give yourself extra confidence in a situation like a presentation involving your bosses. If you begin to feel uncomfortable, remind yourself that you’re showcasing skills and strengths you already possess. Confidence is believing you are able; competence is knowing you are able.

    Provide value. Think about what the people above you need and look for opportunities to add value. From this perspective, your job is to make them look good. Try to stay connected to their goals and objectives as well as their pressures and issues, and always be ready with ideas and solutions.

    Make yourself indispensable. Some people equate managing up with sucking up, but that’s not it at all. It’s about highlighting your skills and showing you’re dependable and proactive. And all it takes is excellent work and a willingness to please. Do your job cheerfully, work hard and lighten your boss’s load where you can.

    Communicate well. Be mindful of making a good impression as a communicator: don’t allow yourself to ramble, watch your tone and volume, and remember what you have to say. Be clear, concise and competent. Communicate well and you’ll automatically be perceived as knowledgeable and capable.

    Don’t drop the ball. Be honest with yourself about your workload so you don’t overextend yourself. You may not have all the skills you need yet, and that’s OK. Taking on new assignments is a great way to learn, but don’t be afraid to ask for help from those who can coach and mentor you. Especially when you’re making yourself visible to the higher-ups, you don’t want to be seen dropping the ball.

    Managing down, across and up all involve different skills , and all three are important to anyone in leadership. Work to build strengths in all three areas, but remember that managing up is essential to advancement.

    Lead from within: Knowing how to manage up well is a major skill in effective leadership.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How the Best Leaders Manage Up Effectively appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:58 on 2019/06/25 Permalink
    Tags: , , Goals and Success, , , , , , ,   

    How to Ask Someone to Be Your Mentor 


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    We all know how valuable a mentor can be. They can change your career, open up new perspectives, and help you reach the next level. But many people never take advantage of the benefits of a mentor, even though they really want one, for the simple reason that they don’t know how to ask.

    If you’re considering a mentor or working up your nerve to ask, here are some tips that can help:

    Start by thinking it through. Before you start selecting a prospective mentor, give some thought to what you want to accomplish and what kind of help you can use.

    Find a candidate. Identify a mentor who can help you with what you want to achieve. The ideal candidate is someone who has done something similar themselves, who has the expertise and knowledge you need. Think of the people you already know, and talk to colleagues who may be able to connect you with a wider network of candidates. As you think about possible mentors, consider their values and their style of leadership and communication to make sure they’re compatible with yours. And keep your options realistic: the CEO of a large corporation may be the person who feels like the best fit, but it’s not likely that they have time to devote to mentorship.

    Make the ask. Once you’ve identified the best candidate, it’s time to approach them. Don’t just walk up to someone and ask, “Will you be my mentor?” It might work, but it’s awkward and not the best path to a yes. Instead, try this technique, which has always worked for me: Say, “I really admire [something that stands out to you about their work] and was wondering if I could ask for your advice and guidance from time to time as a mentor as I [what you want to accomplish].

    Express gratitude. Once you have a response, whether it’s yes or no, express gratitude for their time and effort. You never know why they might be saying yes, and you can never judge the reasons why they may have said no. Whatever their answer and their reasons, a gracious response from you will build goodwill.

    Set up expectations. If the person does say yes, follow up to work through the details. Be sure that you and your mentor have a clear understanding of exactly what you want from the relationship, how much time it will take, and how often you will meet.

    Lead from within: A mentor can be immensely helpful. It’s important to find the right person and, once you do, to get the relationship off to a good start by asking in the right way.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Ask Someone to Be Your Mentor appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:42 on 2019/05/23 Permalink
    Tags: , , Goals and Success, , , , , , ,   

    How to Make the Most of One-on-One Meetings with Your Boss 


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    Everyone wants to have good meetings, especially the one-on-one meetings with their boss. Many people dread them, but those meetings are the foundation for success. It’s possible to not only excel in them but to come away from them feeling more productive and energized. Whether you meet with your boss weekly, quarterly, or even just once a year, here are some tips for making the most of that time:

    Create an agenda. The most productive meetings have a set agenda. Establishing an agenda ahead of time gives the meeting structure and allows both of you to prepare. Several days ahead of the meeting, jot down any questions you want answered and items you want to discuss, and provide a copy to your boss.

    Show leadership. Who you are is just important as what you say and how you say it. Don’t be afraid to demonstrate your abilities and speak with confidence. When you do, you reinforce the idea that you’re the right person for the job.

    Stay on track. To demonstrate your productivity and effectiveness, don’t get sidetracked by small talk except for a short set of pleasantries at the beginning. Instead, update your boss on your current projects and future plans. Don’t bombard them with too many details; let them know everything they need to stay informed without taking up too much of their time.

    Present new ideas. Show your boss that you are not only working on your current projects but developing other ideas as well. Always focus on solutions instead of problems.

    Ask for feedback. It’s great for your boss to see your strengths, but you want to also show that you’re open to development and growth, so ask for feedback. Be specific—don’t just ask “How am I doing?” but “What do you think I can do to improve in workflow?” (or leadership, management, or another area).

    Make agreements. It’s best to have an agreement with your boss about the next steps in each of the things you’re working on. Agree on the immediate way forward, and be clear about expectations.

    Be of service. End your meetings by asking your boss “How can I support you?” Taking even a few minutes to acknowledge their role can make a big difference. It shows empathy, consideration, and an eye for the big picture—and it will likely build valuable trust and goodwill.

    At the end of the day, the most effective one-on-one meetings are a two-way street: where you and your boss serve and support each other. Don’t ask yourself how you can get the most out of the meeting but how both of you can find ways to work together to advance your organization’s mission.

    Lead from within: Even if your one-on-one meetings are already working well, consider these ideas and other ways to make them more effective and successful.


    #1  N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Make the Most of One-on-One Meetings with Your Boss appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:58 on 2018/07/05 Permalink
    Tags: , , Goals and Success, , , , , , ,   

    How to Make Your Management Meetings More Productive  


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    For anyone who works within an organization, meetings are a fact of life. And there are few things in corporate life worse than badly run meetings—the ones that don’t start on time and don’t stay on track but circle around and around in endless discussion with no direction, leaving everyone to wonder who’s in charge.

    It doesn’t have to be that way. A meeting that’s structured and run well can be an effective and even productive use of everyone’s time. As a leadership and executive coach, I’ve helped hundreds of chief executives learn how to run effective meetings.

    Based on that experience, here are the strategies that work best:

    Provide an agenda in advance. An effective meeting needs prep work, and that  means putting together an agenda. An agenda is a great tool for making sure your meetings stay on track and on time. It can help you set expectations up front, organize the subjects you want to cover into a workable structure, and avoid wasted time.

    Send the agenda and any important background material 24 hours in advance. Once you’ve prepared your agenda, send it to participants for input. There may be something important that another participant wants to talk about, or something you’ve forgotten to add—or there may be some points you’ve listed that are already resolved. By sending the agenda and other meeting materials in advance, you give people a chance to prepare and make the most of their time.

    Highlight important agenda items. Make a list of the highest-priority items, the ones that are the most important or urgent. Get through those before you tackle the lower-priority items so if something takes longer than planned you don’t have to let the meeting run late.

    Determine whether each agenda item requires a decision or is open only for discussion. Then include both lists as part of the agenda. If possible, assign and enforce time limits for all speakers on each agenda item.

    Prepare yourself. For every meeting on your calendar, schedule a 15-minute block of prep time. Use that time to think of ways you can add value to the meeting. Good preparation will allow you to lend your expertise to the meeting.

    Start on time. If you don’t start your meetings on time, chances are you won’t end on time. Then the next meeting starts late. Before you know it, the entire day is off schedule. This strict time rule needs to happen at every level of the organization, starting from the very top.

    Gather the right people. Give some thought to the list of people who should be there because of their expertise, their great ideas, or their need to know. At the same time, don’t waste the time of people who don’t have a reason to be there.

    Stay away from rabbit holes. Every meeting has a tendency to stray off topic. If the subject begins to wander, quickly move back to the agenda. Don’t be afraid to intervene and bring the conversation back to the topic.

    Have a parking lot. When a meeting goes off topic but the discussion is a good one to talk about, park the idea with a commitment to revisit it at a later meeting. Then make sure you really do revisit it.

    End on time.  If you’re good about setting an agenda with clear outcomes, you will know when a meeting needs to end. People have short attention spans. By keeping meetings short and timely, you have a better chance of holding their attention. Time is a precious resource, and no one wants their time wasted. Streamline meetings as much as possible.

    Summarize each agenda item when you’ve finished discussing it. At the close of the meeting, summarize the next steps that the group has decided to take. This will ensure that everyone is clear on the tasks that have been assigned to them and the actions they need to take next.

    Capture decisions and discuss next steps. You may have had a wildly productive meeting, but if the decisions weren’t captured, it could be as if it never happened. End every meeting with clear agreements and make notes on final decisions. Make sure you capture any immediate actions and assign them to the appropriate people. Send out your meeting notes promptly to everyone who attended to provide people with something to refer back to.

    When you know how to lead great meetings, your team will have less wasted time, less frustration, and more time and energy for everyone to do the work that matters most.

    Lead From Within: Meetings are good if they are productive, if they waste your time, get rid of them, because actions speak louder than words.


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post How to Make Your Management Meetings More Productive  appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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