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  • feedwordpress 08:00:45 on 2018/09/18 Permalink
    Tags: , Employees, , Important, , , , ,   

    10 Ways to Make Your Team Feel Appreciated and Important 

    Whatever we learned about leadership even a decade ago is outdated. Under the old model, leaders made all the decisions and the rest of the team went along.

    Today the concept of employee empowerment is changing the game. Giving front-line employees the authority to make decisions once reserved only for managers and leaders brings them a sense of ownership and gives consumers the experience of a responsive, caring organization.

    Here are some ways to make your team feel appreciated and important under the new model:

    Offer them safety. People will entrust their future only to someone they consider reliable; they want to know they can count on someone trustworthy, someone who will have their back when things go wrong . if you want to empower your people make them feel safe.

    Speak with kindness. It takes wisdom and determination to lead others not through power and authority but by inspiring and motivating them with words that are both truthful and kind. Kindness makes anyone feel valued and respected.

    Accept them for who they are. We have an all-too-human inclination to judge others, and overcoming it can be difficult. But the best leaders are those who don’t judge but unconditionally accept others, with all their strengths and weaknesses. It’s an approach that raises people’s self-esteem, reinforces their self-image and makes them enthusiastic members of the team.

    Demonstrate that you trust them.  Let them make decisions that matter and can impact the company. Verbal appreciation is important, and bonuses and other perks are always welcome—but ultimately, showing someone that you trust their opinion and expertise is the most valuable form of appreciation you can give.

    Be available and accessible. Adopting an open-door policy shows that you care about your team by being available and accessible enough that  they can always come to you with their input and insights. Let them know their opinions are valued and appreciated. Whether you regularly walk around or simply leave your door open, show your team that you’re there for them.

    Appreciate their efforts. Many leaders appreciate people for obtaining results, but the best kind of leader appreciates people for their effort. Letting your team know they’re doing a great job will not only ensure they continue to produce high-quality work but also increase their satisfaction.

    If you want to speed processes and still produce quality materials and services, focus on making your team feel appreciated and important. In return, they will reward you with hard work and loyalty.

    Lead from within: Leadership at its core can make or break teams. As a leader, you have the power to make people feel important and appreciated or overlooked and ungrateful. It’s your choice.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post 10 Ways to Make Your Team Feel Appreciated and Important appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 04:52:00 on 2018/06/16 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Employees, Hate, , , , ,   

    How to Get Along with a Co-worker You Hate 

    Hate is a strong word. But sometimes you will likely have to work with people you have a hard time getting along with, and over time those feelings can grow into something strong enough to warrant the word.

    Maybe they’re untrustworthy, or lazy, or self-aggrandizing, or unaware of how their habits affect others. Maybe they just rub you the wrong way. Whatever the issue,  you may be feeling that the only way to make it better is to leave.

    But if leaving isn’t an option–or if you like your job and don’t want to give it up–there are things you can do to cope.

    Here are seven ways you can make life more bearable with a co-worker you despise:

    If you can’t change the situation, you have to learn to change yourself.

    If you can’t change the other person–and the odds are high that you can’t–what you can do is to change yourself. Work to adopt a different attitude and mindset. Remember that leadership begins from within, and by developing the resources to deal with your frustration, you’re building a valuable skill.

    To get a solution you must first reframe the problem.

    It’s easy to recall all the things you dislike about your coworker, but instead work to reframe them by focusing on their good qualities. As a coach, when I help people navigate conflicts, I always have each person state a few things that they appreciate about the other. If you can come from a positive side and find something, however small, to feel good about, you’ll be much better off.

    Let the things that irritate you lead to a better understanding of yourself.

    When you have a strong reaction to someone else, psychology says that it might be projection or envy. When you realize you’re totally irritated by something, take a moment to consider whether it might relate to something you dislike within yourself. What we hate in others is likely to be a reflection of our own worst qualities.

    Remember that whatever you resist will follow you.

    If you can’t find a way to work through what you’re feeling, chances are that you’ll have to face the same issue down the road. The lessons we encounter in life tend to be repeated until we manage to truly learn and internalize them. It’s human nature to resist these patterns–and the more important the issue, the more resistance we throw at it. But if you work through it now, you can save yourself a lot of trouble.

    Be radically honest no matter how much you want to hide the truth.

    Hating anyone burns up your emotional bandwidth and energy, keeping you from the things you need to do. Be honest and have a courageous conversation by being vulnerable about voicing your opinions. Much of the time, people are completely oblivious to how their behavior makes other people feel. Bringing their lousy behavior to their attention may open the door and change things for the better.

    Treat feedback as a gift that you are given in the present.

    When you confront someone, you also have to be prepared to listen to their side. Seek first to understand-pay attention to what is being said, taking in body language and tone as well as what’s spoken, then respond, don’t react.

    Focus on inclusion because segregation has never brought anyone but trouble. 

    When you really can’t stand someone, don’t think of segregating yourself from that person. Instead, find ways to include them in what you do. Find out more about the person, learn their story, and try to understand what drives them. You may find out you’ve been reading them all wrong.

    These things are not easy to do–trust me, I know. When people come to me as a coach and ask how to handle a person they hate, they want a quick fix, but quick fixes aren’t really fixes at all. If it’s going to get better, we have to work harder.

    In a perfect world, we’d get along perfectly in good relationships with all our co-workers. In reality, most of us spend at least some time working with someone we can’t stand– but there are always options to try and make things a little better.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post How to Get Along with a Co-worker You Hate appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:53 on 2018/06/12 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Employees, , , , , ,   

    How to Encourage Your Employees to Take Leadership Roles  

    Every organization needs strong leadership at the top—but that’s not enough. You need leaders throughout your company, in every area and at every level.

    When you have people with leadership potential in roles where they can make important decisions, achieve goals, reach targets and feed the bottom line, you’ll have a thriving and strong organization.

    One of the best things you can do as a leader is to encourage your employees to take on leadership roles. Here are some ways to make that happen:

    Create a compelling vision tied to a strong sense of purpose.

    It’s a combination that gives people the energy and passion to be creative, responsible and accountable. Thinking in terms of a mission greater than themselves, they feel empowered to bring out their best. Seek out and hire people who resonate with and are excited by the organization’s vision, and provide ways for them to help fulfill its purpose.

    Identify the right people to do the right things.

    One of the best ways to empower people is to recognize their talents and give them jobs that feed their strengths. It begins with having the right people—those who can elevate themselves into leadership roles via their competence and capabilities—doing the right things and gaining confidence along the way.

    Encourage decisiveness and accountability.

    One important trait of being a leader is the ability to make decisions and to be accountable for your actions. When you give your employees autonomy and authority, you’re telling them you trust them. And when you show trust, most—if not all—will step up and surprise you with how much they can do if they know you are counting on them.

    Promote collaboration and cooperation.

    It’s frustrating and difficult when an organization is structured in silos; the best companies foster cross-functional teams that cut across departmental boundaries to take full advantage of the ideas and expertise of all employees. Any time you put people together, encourage teamwork, collaboration and cooperation, and reward those who take on extra initiatives. This practice will encourage people to display their leadership skills and is a great investment for the business at large.

    Communicate often. If you want people to take on leadership roles, communicate with transparency and share information freely. Only when they have information can employees make sound decisions, achieve their goals, reach their targets and step up to their leadership roles.

    Lead from within: The more you support your people, the more support your people will provide you.

     


    N A T I O N A L    B E S T S E L L E R

    THE LEADERSHIP GAP

    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post How to Encourage Your Employees to Take Leadership Roles  appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 02:12:11 on 2018/06/12 Permalink
    Tags: , , Employees, , , , ,   

    9 Easy Ways to Show Your Employees You Value Them 

    Employees who feel appreciated feel valued. And when people feel valued, they’re more likely to go above and beyond for the organization. They’re quicker to hold themselves accountable for their part of a project. Most importantly, they’re happier in their roles, which means they’re less likely to leave.

    When leaders disregard opportunities to connect with their team and show employees their appreciation, they lose a secret weapon in building a dedicated, long-term team.

    The first Friday of every March is Employee Appreciation Day, but don’t wait until then to celebrate and appreciate your most important asset. Make employee appreciation not an annual event but a daily habit.Here are nine great ways to show your employees some appreciation:

    1. Do little things that make a big difference.

    Appreciation doesn’t require big extravagant gestures. Send a handwritten note of appreciation, write a quick email, make a call of encouragement. Even little gestures can make a big impression.

    2. Create new opportunities.

    One of the best ways to win the hearts and minds of your employees is to give them as many opportunities as you can. Let them take on big challenges like a highly visible project or a new leadership role, or pick up the tab for a workshop or conference.

    3. Make it personal and specific.

    Be specific about your expressions of appreciation and recognition. Don’t just say “good job”; give a bit of detail about what impressed you. For example, “Thanks for having the courage to speak up in the meeting. It made a big difference in breaking the ice when everyone else was too fearful to talk about the problem.”

    4. Show you trust them.

    When you can show your employees you trust them, it sends a very important message. In essence, you’re telling them their work is good enough that they don’t need you looking over their shoulder.

    5. Make internal improvements.

    Make sure your team has the tools they need to do their job–up-to-date technology, good lighting and HVAC, and comfortable, ergonomic fixtures. Consider taking suggestions and adding extras like a break room or lounge.

    6. Make time to connect.

    Leaders have a lot of responsibilities, and it’s easy to get caught up in your own work, without paying much attention to your team. But one of the best ways to show your employees you appreciate them is making the time to connect with them. Find out how they’re doing–including their lives outside work.

    7. Make mentorship part of the culture.

    In almost any organization, there are newer employees who could benefit from being paired with an old hand. Whether you establish a formal mentorship program or a more casual buddy system, there’s no better way to transmit helpful information and give newbies a support system right from the start.

    8. Give them ownership.

    A surefire way to motivate people to bring their best is to hand them the keys to a project close to their expertise and interest. If possible, let the project be based on the employee’s own ideas. Not only will the employee be empowered to grow and succeed, but other employees will be inspired by seeing their colleague’s creativity rewarded.

    9. Be honest and transparent.

    Honesty should be a given, but it’s easier at some times than at others. Many people believe you shouldn’t talk about the bad news, but those conversations–difficult as they may be–prove you care enough to deliver even hard truths. Truthful and transparent feedback will gain you respect and garner the best possible results.

    The bottom line: Once you your employees know how much you value them, there’s nothing they won’t work to accomplish for you and the team.


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now
     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post 9 Easy Ways to Show Your Employees You Value Them appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 19:28:10 on 2018/06/11 Permalink
    Tags: , , Employees, , , , ,   

    6 Reasons Your Employees Hate Coming to Work (and What to Do About It) 

    A recent Gallup poll showed that just 30 percent of employees in America feel engaged at work. Around the world, across 142 countries, the proportion of employees who feel engaged at work is just 13 percent.

    Far too many people are finding that work has become a depleting, dispiriting experience. Here are some of the reasons employees say they hate coming to work:

    1. Work demands too much of their time. Blurred boundaries between work and home magnify the challenge of worker engagement. Thanks to technology, work hours extend way beyond the traditional work day–and sometimes run 24/7.

    2. The distinction between work and life is reduced. An unprecedented flood of information and requests compels us to read and respond at all hours of the day and night. Even if it’s not directly job-related, there’s constant pressure to keep up on developments in your field, social media, and other related areas. When demand exceeds capacity, it drains energy and stamina.

    3. It’s difficult to focus on important tasks. When there’s too much to do and not enough time, frustration is a given. Overload and competing deadlines make it hard to set priorities and focus. When people are asked to do everything, they end up achieving nothing.

    4. There’s no time to reset. When workers feel a constant pressure to produce, to the point that they can’t even take breaks or make time for themselves, they end up feeling discouraged and disparaged. Giving the organization 100 percent means there’s nothing left over for a personal life. It also makes workers less effective; research says people focus best with a break every 90 minutes.

    5. They don’t feel valued. If people don’t feel recognized and appreciated for their hard work, they become indifferent and lose motivation. Making people feel appreciated and valued has a more significant impact on employee effectiveness than any other behavior by a leader. Employees who say they have a more supportive culture are 1.3 times as likely to stay with the organization and are 67 percent more engaged.

    6. They can’t find meaning: If there is no compelling purpose attached to the job they do, most people will end up hating their work. When you don’t understand or subscribe to the meaning, you don’t really end up liking what you do. People want to derive meaning and significance from their work. And those who do are three times more likely to stay with their organization–making it the single most impactful variable in any survey on engagement.

    If you want your people not to hate coming to work, you have to not work them 24/7, give them work-life balance, allow them to work without distraction, let them know you appreciate and value them, and provide compelling meaning for the work they do.

    Put your people first–even above customers–because they are the key to creating long-term value.

     


    N A T I O N A L    B E S T S E L L E R

    THE LEADERSHIP GAP

    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post 6 Reasons Your Employees Hate Coming to Work (and What to Do About It) appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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