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  • feedwordpress 16:15:22 on 2018/10/16 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Difficult People   

    Should You Let Your Boss Shift the Blame to You? 

    Question: “My boss recently shifted blame in my direction for some mistakes in a print campaign, when the problem was actually some simple miscommunication between us. She didn’t blame me directly or maliciously; she just conveniently left out some facts when describing the problem to her superiors, and that made her look a little better at my expense. What should my reaction be? How much ‘bad press’ should I be willing to absorb for the sake of helping her out, since helping her out is my job?” 

    – Daphne, Public Relations Assistant

     

    See comments below, and send your own question to editor@adminprotoday.com.

     

    This post was shared by our friends at Business Management Daily.

     

    The post Should You Let Your Boss Shift the Blame to You? appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 22:14:32 on 2018/10/05 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Difficult People, ,   

    How to Change Someone’s Bad Attitude 

    As you know, I am big on attitude! I believe in what Charles Swindoll once wrote, “I am convinced that life is 10% what happens to me, and 90% how I react to it.” Being positive or negative about any situation will have its inevitable conclusion because you’ve already framed the end result.

    If you’re like most people reading this weekly column, you choose to surround yourself with positive thinkers. Your continuing success reflects that. Still, we can’t always avoid working with (or sometimes, living with) negative thinkers. Therein lies a problem: What can we do to change a person’s inherently bad attitude, in part so it doesn’t affect us? And should we try?

    Here are a few observations that can help:

    • People are who they are. Like spouses or children, they don’t “change” because you will it. So exerting your influence and expecting the response you want is foolhardy at best and potentially disastrous for your relationship at worst.
    • Try to empathize, even a little. Remember: Life is not fair, and it can be harder on some than others. People who feel defeated or alone in the world still have to wake up each morning and eke out a living like the rest of us. We don’t have to know the exact reasons behind their troubles to see the cloud that surrounds them at work, and to pause a moment and wish that weren’t so- for their sakes more than ours.
    • Reach out as you’re able. Make an effort to connect and be friendly- more than once, if need be. People with poor attitudes tend to be protective and distrusting- and may not initially welcome your friendship, perhaps because they fear there are “strings” attached. Be gentle in your persistence: It’ll reinforce your sincerity, likely earning their trust and a better attitude in the process.

    One final note: When a person’s bad attitude cannot be tempered by the above methods, yet still needs to be addressed for the benefit of the workplace, you may want to consider constructively confronting the situation or suggesting that a manager do so. Many times, informing people of their bad attitude in a positive way (i.e., “I thought you’d want to know the impact X, Y or Z is having on the staff, because I’m confident that’s not how you meant to be perceived…”) can help influence change, simply by making them aware.

    Have a great week- and remember your attitude impacts others, too! So share your positivity, and help everyone you encounter make the most of every day!

    joan_burge_signature

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  • feedwordpress 16:28:55 on 2018/08/02 Permalink
    Tags: Difficult People, , ,   

    Creating A Friendly Work Atmosphere 

    Create a Friendly and Approachable Atmosphere

    In our fast-paced world, people are becoming detached and desensitized. We are more transaction-based, unfocused on how our interaction is affecting other people. When you have that style of interaction with others, the world becomes decidedly colder. You must be aware of when that happens and take the steps necessary to turn it around:

    • Your body language and facial expressions provide visual clues, whether you intend them to or not. You need to be aware of messages you might be sending that you don’t want to send. You should not assume you are communicating what you think you are! You must be open to inventorying your communication style and be aware of cultural diversities that could work for, or against, you.
    • It is important to be genuinely interested when a person is communicating with you. Stopping, listening, and asking questions demonstrates your interest.
    • Assess what kind of environment you work in. Do you post a warning sign that states, “Stop. I am in a bad mood,” when you are having a rough day? Some assistants will say that is exactly the message they want to send. However, even when you are in a bad mood, which is very possible, you want to be very cautious of the message you send to peers or your manager. Sending this message is not conducive to controlling your attitude or choosing what attitude to wear each day.
    • What kinds of things do you surround yourself with that make you look unapproachable? (Your job is to support people whether you want to be bothered or not.)

    Come In with Zeal, Leave with Zen

    You go to work with zeal, having a mindset that you will conquer the day. Then you get into the office and find it is like a zoo.

    You want to leave with Zen, so you approach work by being excited about what you are doing. You approach your work with a good attitude, no matter what happens!

    You find that your work improves, and as that happens, you feel good about what you are accomplishing and how the work is moving forward.

    You are now adding value every day, and it isn’t dependent upon everything at work being perfect. You are managing your attitude (in spite of the zoo!) and so, when it’s time to go, you leave with a Zen-like peacefulness, knowing you cannot be moved by what’s happening around you.

    You form your own emotional “environment,” and in so doing, you work better and have more peacefulness. That’s how you come in with zeal and leave with Zen.

     

    This excerpt is from the book, Who Took My Pen…Again? by Joan Burge. This is available for purchase at the Office Dynamics Success Store.

    The post Creating A Friendly Work Atmosphere appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 20:42:18 on 2018/06/08 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Difficult People, ,   

    When is it too soon—or too late—to thwart bullying? 

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    Each month we feature a question from our friends at Business Management Daily’s Admin Pro Forum. Please enjoy engaging in a conversation about this month’s question.

    Question: “I’ve told myself that if my boss takes a very bullying tone to me again, I’ll speak up about it. But in the heat of the moment, I tend to weaken and not defend myself from it. If I confront him directly, should I come back to his office sometime after it’s over and we’ve both settled down, or deal with the issue right away and risk an escalating argument? Should I report his actions to someone immediately after it happens, or should I wait till I cool down so I get a better perspective and have notes? It’s not so much a question of if I try to put an end to what I think is bullying; it’s when.” – Anonymous Admin

    Feel free to leave your response below!

     

    training_program_for_administrative_assistants

    “Of all the programs offered by other training companies that I’ve attended, World Class Assistant™ was much more comprehensive and intense. This program is head and shoulders above the rest!” – Jennie

    The post When is it too soon—or too late—to thwart bullying? appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 20:00:19 on 2018/05/01 Permalink
    Tags: , Difficult People, , , , , ,   

    Before You Retaliate 

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    Before you retaliate

    It’s almost instinctive to yell back or to be offended at someone who is yelling at you—be it a co-worker or a manager. But yelling back or arguing accomplishes little. It can destroy a business relationship and certainly dims your professional image. So before you respond to a verbal attack, keep these things in mind.

    • Figure out what’s really going on. In each of the following cases, compassion—not retaliation—is in order.
    • Every one is liable to blow up during a rough day at work. If the person yelling at you isn’t known as a chronic jerk, then consider that the source of the blow-up could stem other reasons and not personal.
    • Consider that some people are just socially inept and know no other way to communicate.
    • Then, there are some people who crave the attention and know that yelling or being aggressive is one way to get it.
    • Listen before you leap to conclusions. Assume first that what a person is saying is true. More often than not, we tend to start making a list of what’s wrong with a person and miss the opportunity to really find out what’s at issue. At that point, no one is listening to what the other is saying.
    • Stay neutral. Instead of adding fuel to the argument by yelling back, deflect the hostilities. Don’t walk away. Instead, demonstrate a neutral position. Answer in a calm, steady voice or give an inane answer. It usually stops an argument cold.
    • And don’t handle this via email. Take advantage of a Human Moment.

    Forgiving is not forgetting; it’s letting of go of anger and hurt and moving on. Take time. It’s not easy to forgive with both your head and heart.

    – Joan Burge

    The post Before You Retaliate appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
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