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  • feedwordpress 09:00:19 on 2022/11/22 Permalink
    Tags: , Credibility, , , , , , , ,   

    7 Common Phrases That Can Ruin Your Leadership Credibility 


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    We’ve all been there: someone says something and you suddenly think I’m not sure I trust them now.

    Credibility is like a currency that never depreciates unless you do something to undercut its value. If people think you’re credible, they trust you. They listen to you, depend on you, and follow you. But if you undermine that credibility, it takes a long time to earn it back.

    In my work as a leadership coach, I help my clients learn to identify and avoid phrases that erode their credibility. Here are seven of the most common:

    “To be honest…” People who are telling the truth don’t have to make a point of it. If you tell people you’re telling the truth, you’re actually warning them to be on guard. When you plant doubt in people’s mind, they lose trust in what you’re saying—and in your overall credibility.

    “I’ll try.” In leadership, it’s important to be decisive and reliable. There is no room for “I’ll try.” If you’re going to do something, say so—and then make sure you do it. If you can’t make that commitment, don’t say anything. When you tell someone you’ll try, all you gain is sounding wishy-washy.

    “Let me get back to you on that.” This phrase may seem harmless, but it sounds like a dodge. Know your capabilities and speak with confidence. If you’re asked something you don’t know, say so outright: “I’m not sure, but I’ll find out.”

    “In my opinion…” This commonly used phrase undermines your point of view. Even if you don’t intend to, it carries a suggestion of bias. Instead, say “I think…” or “My experience suggests….”

    “I could be wrong.” You may be shooting for humility with this phrase, but it comes off as uncertain and unconvincing. If you state a fact, do so with confidence. If there’s a significant chance you’re wrong, lead off with something like “It’s possible…” or don’t say it at all.

    “On the up side…” When people hear this phrase, they know what’s coming: bad news with an attempt at comfort and possibly a poor attempt at humor. Don’t sugarcoat when you have something negative to communicate. Be forthright and honest, and you’ll always hold people’s trust.

    “This is probably stupid, but…” Why would you qualify one of your thoughts as stupid? If it’s genuinely stupid, it’s better left unsaid. If it’s a question, just ask. And if it’s an off-the-wall idea, pitch it that way without calling it stupid.

    When you’re in leadership, communication is one of the most important things you do. It’s how you convey information; just as important, it’s how you signal your credibility and strength. You can be honest and transparent without undermining yourself.

    Lead From Within: Trust, credibility and respect all depend on effective communication.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    The post 7 Common Phrases That Can Ruin Your Leadership Credibility appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:55 on 2021/02/04 Permalink
    Tags: , Credibility, , , , , , ,   

    How to Gain Credibility with your Employees 


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    Do you ever wonder what makes a leader credible? Credibility isn’t something you’re born with but a trait that’s built through hard work and long-term effort. A leader needs credibility to achieve the level of respect and loyalty they need to be effective. To make sure you’re on track to reach that goal, consider the following points:

    Give respect to earn respect.
    Credible leaders understand the importance of treating people with respect—not because they expect it but because they deserve it. And when you give respect to others, they’re inclined to return it to you. Titles can be granted and positions are given, but respect is something you earn—and it’s one of the most significant elements of credibility.

    Show consistency in your behavior. People respond well to consistency. Unpredictable leaders, on the other hand, are disturbing and disruptive. In an uncertain world, people understandably like things they can depend on. If your employees know they can count on you, you’ll be seen as a credible leader. It’s as simple as that.

    Be true to yourself and others. There’s a surprising amount of power in being authentic and genuine. Leaders earn credibility and trust when they’re sincere about who they are and demonstrate that they’re willing to stand up for their values.

    Communicate with transparency. It’s important to always be straight with people and to communicate with candor and a spirit of honesty. You don’t want people to hear or read your words and immediately wonder what you really meant. Honesty and openness go a long way in establishing and keeping credibility.

    Extend trust to receive trust. Like respect, trust is best earned by being freely given. Credible leaders are quick to share trust, and in return they are trusted to lead.

    Tell the truth. Credible leaders follow the voice of their personal integrity. They never fudge the truth to get out of a difficult situation or gain the upper hand in a negotiation. They don’t play games or hide unpleasant details to make themselves look good. Their word is as good as the truth.

    Assume responsibility. Hold yourself fully accountable for your decisions and actions. When you make a mistake, own up to it and take the necessary steps to correct the wrong. Model unwavering integrity in every situation, and in turn you’ll receive not only credibility but also admiration.

    At the bottom line, your credibility as a leader plays a huge role in determining whether people want to follow you or not, whether they respect you or not, and whether they’ll be loyal or not. It’s one of the greatest assets you can give yourself, with a value that extends beyond employees to influence customers, investors, your peers, and your community.

    Lead from within: It’s easy to become a leader but difficult to become a credible one. It takes years of determined effort and doing the right thing to earn a high level of credibility, but the benefits are worth the effort.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Gain Credibility with your Employees appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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