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  • feedwordpress 18:08:16 on 2019/05/02 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Conflict Resolution, , , ,   

    How Do I Tactfully Voice My Concern? – Ask an Admin 


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    Executive Assistants and Administrative Assistants have to deal with a lot. Whether that is working remotely, working with several managers or executives, and sometimes supporting an entire floor of employees! Usually, these difficult situations bring up situations that leave them asking, “how do I tactfully voice my concern?”

    Heather D. asks us:

    I am a Certified Executive Administrative Professional and have been an Executive Assistant (EA) for the last 15 years to a VP of my former employer where we had a very good Business Partner relationship. I have since been forced to leave that employer almost 2 years ago now due to downsizing and am in a different EA role with a quickly growing company reporting to both the CEO and CFO.

    The role posted was framed up that I would be supporting them in the day to day activities much like an EA role does however since the day I was hired I have simply been a  “taskmaster/office manager” doing miscellaneous office/employee relations type tasks with very little interaction with either the CEO or CFO including my mid-year and end of the year evaluations. Both senior leaders have grown with the company for the last 28+ years and have never had what we know to be a true EA and aren’t interested in my role evolving to that at all. They did, however, hire a VP of Sales this past July that I was told I would be supporting as well and that he is being groomed to replace the CEO within the next 1-2  yrs. As part of this VP’s onboarding, I got to know him well and he had a true EA in the last 15 years with his former employer and would like to have one here.

    The CEO, CFO and this new VP of Sales all agreed that most of my time should be supporting him and that the VP of Sales was given the go-ahead to rewrite my job description however I don’t report to him or sit near him and both of those are necessary, in my opinion, to do this EA role the most efficiently and effectively (not to mention an accurate job description). The problem is that this company is moving and growing so quickly with “multiple hot irons in the fire” all the time that neither the CEO or the VP of Sales has had any time to see this transition through and it has been about 2 months since they last told me this transition was happening.

    My question is should I be approaching my direct leader (who I have no interaction with), the CEO or the new VP of Sales (which is who I have been working 50-75% of the time for in the last 6 months)? How do I approach this respectfully and voice my concerns in a firm manner around the current reporting/relationship structure?

    Well that is actually a very tough question! How do you tactfully voice your concern as an administrative professional without causing trouble?


    Want to learn more about Ask an Admin and how to submit your own question? Click here

    The post How Do I Tactfully Voice My Concern? – Ask an Admin appeared first on Office Dynamics - Executive And Administrative Assistant Training.

     
  • feedwordpress 20:10:13 on 2019/04/04 Permalink
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    How to Help Your Manager Get Things Done – Ask an Admin 


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    If you are an Administrative Professional looking for your questions to be answered by your peers, then this is the place for you! This is the best blog for advice for administrative assistants and executive assistants provided by Office Dynamics International.

    This week Renee C. asks:

    As an administrative assistant, how do you get your supervisor to complete his tasks and get things done, especially in a timely manner and meet deadlines? I’ve tried everything from whiteboards of projects to various types of folders with deadlines, to scheduling time in outlook, sending reminders (email, outlook, paper) to standing weekly meetings with him. Things don’t get done nor do they get done in a timely manner. I don’t know what other methods and/or processes to use.

    Wow! Ok, Renee is wondering how does an administrative assistant manage her manager or executive? Does Renee start with managing deadlines, learning how to schedule properly? Or does this frustrated administrative assistant need to build on her partnership with her executive? How do you help your manager get things done?

    We have several tools that actually can help with this but we want to see what you have to say!


    If you have a question that you would like to submit, please send it to officedynamics.aaa@gmail.com and include the name you would like us to use.

    If you want to subscribe to our blog so you don’t miss any posts, please visit https://officedynamics.com/blog/ and subscribe in the right-hand column.

    If you’ve submitted your response on our Ask an Admin blog post, please be patient to see your response and other responses. We have to manually approve them to prevent spammers and profanity. If you do not see your response right away, please give it time and revisit. We apologize for this but this is the best way we can keep YOUR blog clean! Thank you, everyone!

    The post How to Help Your Manager Get Things Done – Ask an Admin appeared first on Executive And Administrative Assistant Training - Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 15:00:55 on 2019/03/21 Permalink
    Tags: , Conflict Resolution, ,   

    Administrative Assistants Working in a Team – Ask an Admin 


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    Ask an Admin is a concept that brings administrative professionals together for the best peer to peer advice from administrative assistants and executive assistants from around the world!

    This week Elizabeth comes to us with a tough question:

    Dear Admins:

    I find myself in a conundrum.  In our division, we have myself (Executive Administrator) and three Team Assistants (two in our building, and one in another state).

    After a long period of uneven support of specific local teams which resulted in the termination of a previous Team Assistant, we hired a new Team Assistant to take over the area.  Thinking to avoid a repeat performance, the candidate was interviewed several managers in the impacted area, as well as the Executive responsible and myself. The start was auspicious – lots of energy, interest and willingness to learn. We are now 15 months in and I observe there is significant departure from the first 90 days – late arrivals, early departures, unwillingness to take on work, lack of communication, dropped tasks, etc.

    I am frustrated as the remaining local Team Assistant and I invested significant time to schedule weekly lunches to ensure we meshed personally, initiated a weekly Admin Team Meeting to discuss activities and needs for backup support, and arranged a weekly all-day work-together session on Fridays to close the week and answer any questions that came up in real-time. Despite individual conversations and an intervention which included the Executive for the impacted area, the behavior does not change.

    I have come to realize that this is a management issue – lack of oversight, unwillingness to oversee the employee.  I am at a loss as to the next step. My boss, our division lead & the manager’s boss,  is informed.  The admin’s manager is not willing to manage the employee to the detriment of his teams and allows the incomplete work to spill over into the task lists of myself and the local Team Assistant. Staff members complain, but the feedback falls on deaf ears.

    What is an admin to do besides pick up the additional workload to ensure the service across teams is consistent?

    Okay, now that is a tough question! What is one to do when “all pistons aren’t firing” properly? The team is suffering because one isn’t pulling their weight and it sounds like the others are having to put extra effort into covering for this individual. Wow, very tough question!


    About Ask an Admin:

    Ask an Admin will be a weekly post on our blog that presents a question that you or a fellow administrative professional submitted to us. We will choose one question per week and post it on our blog.

    If you have a question that you would like to submit, please send it to officedynamics.aaa@gmail.com and include the name you would like us to use.

    If you want to subscribe to our blog so you don’t miss any posts, please visit https://officedynamics.com/blog/ and subscribe in the right-hand column.

    ATTENTION: If you’ve submitted your response on our Ask an Admin blog post, please be patient to see your response and other responses. We have to manually approve them to prevent spammers and profanity. If you do not see your response right away, please give it time and revisit. We apologize for this but this is the best way we can keep YOUR blog clean! Thank you, everyone!

    The post Administrative Assistants Working in a Team – Ask an Admin appeared first on Executive And Administrative Assistant Training - Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 19:00:24 on 2019/02/27 Permalink
    Tags: , , Conflict Resolution, , ,   

    How do I Deal with an Executive that Always Says Yes? – Ask an Admin 


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    Welcome to Ask an Admin! This is where any administrative assistant or executive assistant can submit any question they have and your peers can weigh in on the conversation with their advice. There is more than one way to approach a situation or problem so we would love to hear your input!

    This week Karen asks:

    How do Administrative Professionals deal with an executive who says yes to everything?

    Background info: Our new CEO says yes via meeting requests via email, text, LinkedIn, Facebook and many other social media channels and then in an email or other post tags me asking me to set up a meeting. I’m struggling since the new CEO started in November, I have a Google doc with all of the requests have come through, ranked them via importance. He isn’t making it a priority to prioritize his schedule and also he doesn’t look at his schedule, I can email, print out or text meetings and he only wants to know what meeting is next. He can also get upset if he’s not prepped properly, but if he’s not making our meetings a priority how can I prepare him properly for success in his role?

    So it sounds like Karen may have a “button masher” (someone that just clicks approve or yes without looking) and isn’t taking the time to prep himself. Wow! This is a tough one…

    Well what does Karen need to do? What can she do?

    ATTENTION: If you’ve submitted your response on our Ask an Admin blog post, please be patient to see your response and other responses. We have to manually approve them to prevent spammers and profanity. If you do not see your response right away, please give it time and revisit. We apologize for this but this is the best way we can keep YOUR blog clean! Thank you, everyone!


    About Ask an Admin:

    Ask an Admin will be a weekly post on our blog that presents a question that you or a fellow administrative professional submitted to us. We will choose one question per week and post it on our blog.

    If you have a question that you would like to submit, please send it to officedynamics.aaa@gmail.com and include the name you would like us to use.

    If you want to subscribe to our blog so you don’t miss any posts, please visit https://officedynamics.com/blog/ and subscribe in the right-hand column.

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    Monday Motivators™ is a weekly email sent from Joan Burge that gives you a little kick start to the week. These emails will include work advice, life advice, and sometimes how to find that good balance. To subscribe to Monday Motivators™ please click the button below.


    Help other administrative professionals and share this page using the buttons below!

    The post How do I Deal with an Executive that Always Says Yes? – Ask an Admin appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 17:10:28 on 2018/12/11 Permalink
    Tags: , Conflict Resolution,   

    Bouncing Back from Failure 


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    Has it been another week of adventure? A lot can happen between Monday and Friday, can’t it?

    I’d like to focus today on Turning Failure into Success. Failure is a dirty word in the corporate world. And our success-oriented society often makes it difficult for those who fail to adjust. This negative attitude often forces people to take job-related failures personally, even if they had little to do with the actual events.

    When failure occurs, many people go through a mourning process similar to that for the death of a loved one: 1) denial, 2) bargaining, 3) anger, 4) depression, and 5) finally, acceptance. While no one embraces failure, some people take it harder than others, blaming themselves entirely for their lack of foresight. Embarrassed to face their colleagues, unable to confide in their friends or family, they are isolated in their own grief.

    Thought for the week: “I will turn any failure or setback into a success!” Or, “I will encourage someone else who might be experiencing the feeling of failing, whether it is my child, neighbor, or coworker.” Has it been a great week? If not, you can still make a great one!

    Bouncing Back

    1. Acknowledge the failure. When this first, vital step isn’t taken, an atmosphere of fear is created. Instead, face your failure and see that it is an opportunity to learn and grow.
    2.  Ask for help in preventing future failures. If the guilty party doesn’t request help, it may lead this person to say, “I’ll just be more careful next time. I won’t take such a big risk again.” And that sort of thinking leads to stagnation and a loss of creativity and growth for both individuals and organizations.

    Failure can be an opportunity to reflect, rethink values and interests, and then make positive changes. People are often better off after they’ve failed because if it hadn’t been for their missteps, they might still be in the same rut.

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    The post Bouncing Back from Failure appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
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