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  • feedwordpress 20:42:18 on 2018/06/08 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Conflict Resolution, , ,   

    When is it too soon—or too late—to thwart bullying? 

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    Each month we feature a question from our friends at Business Management Daily’s Admin Pro Forum. Please enjoy engaging in a conversation about this month’s question.

    Question: “I’ve told myself that if my boss takes a very bullying tone to me again, I’ll speak up about it. But in the heat of the moment, I tend to weaken and not defend myself from it. If I confront him directly, should I come back to his office sometime after it’s over and we’ve both settled down, or deal with the issue right away and risk an escalating argument? Should I report his actions to someone immediately after it happens, or should I wait till I cool down so I get a better perspective and have notes? It’s not so much a question of if I try to put an end to what I think is bullying; it’s when.” – Anonymous Admin

    Feel free to leave your response below!

     

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    “Of all the programs offered by other training companies that I’ve attended, World Class Assistant™ was much more comprehensive and intense. This program is head and shoulders above the rest!” – Jennie

    The post When is it too soon—or too late—to thwart bullying? appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 15:30:49 on 2018/04/30 Permalink
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    5 Ways to Be a Value-Added Employee 

     

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    I’m not sure if you know that 80% of my work is onsite training for administrative office professionals so I do a lot of traveling, in fact, 100% of my clients are out of state. From this point forward, I will be traveling extensively through September.

    While traveling gets old after a while and is tiring, I love what I learn when I go on site into an organization. I see employees in action in their environments. I meet executives and have great discussions. Observing administrative professionals at work is one of my greatest moments. When I’m facilitating a full-day workshop for assistant or executives about maximizing their assistant’s time, I experience several aha moments. I’ve been doing this for 28 years and I never grow weary of learning, experiencing, and coming home feeling rewarded!

    One thing I can tell you from working with top-notch organizations nationwide is that the bar is being raised for all employees across the board. Organizations are communicating that it is time to “step up your game” or you may not be in the game in months to come. I know this is hard on those of you who already contribute a great deal and truly are committed. Then we all know there are the slackers appearing to be doing work. But don’t lose hope. As spring brings everything into bloom, this is your time to bloom. This spring, let your brightest colors show through (meaning all your talents) and be in full bloom.

     

    Be a ‘value added’ employee

    How much value would you say your work adds to the organization? Have you ever thought about it? Now more than ever, not only is every employee expected to pull his or her own weight, each person’s work must add value to the organization. There are a number of ways to be what I call a “value-added” partner. Here are a few that can help you earn the rewards and recognition you deserve:

     

    1. Boost productivity. If you can think of ways to streamline your job (or the work processes in a department, for example), it’ll improve overall productivity. That means more can be accomplished in less time – and management is sure to appreciate that.

     

    1. Make money. Is there a profitable opportunity that your employer is not currently taking advantage of? Whether you are a manager or an assistant, if you are familiar with your business, you can often see ways to make money—perhaps by paying attention to competitors or watching trends. Speak up, or prepare a brief summary describing your idea. Profit-generating ideas are a sure-fire way to promote your value.

     

    1. Save money. “A penny saved is a penny earned” applies to the workplace, as well. In what ways could you help save your employer money? Propose them.

     

    1. Be proactive. Ultimately, the best way to demonstrate your value is to show you don’t have to be asked to do something. You do it because it makes sense – because it helps the business and your co-workers!

     

    1. Go the extra mile. You will be noticed. Anyone can do what is expected, but not everyone can go the extra mile. Think of ways you can take that one extra step or add that one extra special touch.

     

    Star Tip: Document your value-added efforts to ensure you reap the rewards over time. Share results with your leader as they occur, and then again at performance review time. Even if your organization has a salary freeze this year, keep doing your best. Trust me, it’ll pay off!

     

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    Joan Burge
    Founder and CEO

     

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    The post 5 Ways to Be a Value-Added Employee appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 18:28:14 on 2018/03/16 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Conflict Resolution, , , ,   

    Do You Have A Problem Saying No? 

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    What are your tips on the best way an assistant can overcome their problem saying no.

    “I have a real problem saying no at work. How do assert myself when I can’t take on any more?” This is one question I frequently here from administrative and executive assistants. I’m sure you many of you have encountered this, so I’d like your advice.

    “I have a problem saying ‘no’ to anyone. In the past, climbing up to the position I presently hold, it was an asset and it helped me to get noticed and promoted, but now I find it has labeled me as the go-to person. With all the duties I am expected to perform, I just can’t help everyone, yet I find myself doing it anyway. How do I decline without sounding difficult or rude?”

    Assistants all over the world have struggled with how to say ‘no’ at work.

    My question to my readers: How have you handled or would handle a similar situation?

    We encourage you to share in the comments below.

    Are you an assistant who doesn’t have any trouble saying no? What has that experience been like for you?

    Are you an assistant who has a problem saying no at work? Does that spill over outside of work? What are some of the biggest obstacles for you in saying no when you simply can’t or shouldn’t accommodate a person’s request of you?

    Do you simply being the ‘go-to’ person and yes is your favorite word? Let’s hear it! Please share below.

    Need more help in the area of asserting yourself? We’ve got your back. Check out my entire series of blogs and webinars that can help you build your assertiveness in the workplace.

    Do you think that saying no to someone means you are a terrible assistant? Check out our article: Qualities of a Great Assistant (spoiler – Yes Man/Woman isn’t on the list of qualities).

    Related: How Well Do You Communicate? A guest post by Judi Moreo

    Why Being A People-Pleaser Is Bad For Your Health

    The post Do You Have A Problem Saying No? appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 21:30:52 on 2018/03/09 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Conflict Resolution, , , , ,   

    Setting Healthy Boundaries Today 

     

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    Setting Healthy Boundaries

    I was teaching a class two weeks ago from the Star Achievement Series®.  Our theme for that day was the attitude component of Star Achievement. Under that umbrella, we addressed topics such as self-management vs. stress management, learning specific difficult people types and how to handle each of them, the benefits of conflict and much more.  Of course, we had plenty to talk about and one tip an attendee mentioned was, “setting healthy boundaries.”  She definitely got a big star for that one because setting healthy boundaries is important!

    So, what kind of boundaries are we talking about and with whom? After all, as administrative assistants and executive assistants, you sometimes feel like you can’t set boundaries or you might get fired or your leader will think you are not a team player. Some people think when I’m talking about setting boundaries, they have to do with sexual harassment in the workplace.

    When and where to set boundaries

    Boundaries can be set anytime, any place, on anything, and with any person. I’ll give you a perfect example that just happened to me this morning as I was traveling.  I was at the Las Vegas airport in the security line and was in line to pass my carry on through the screening process. (Keep in mind; I’ve been traveling for 20 years about 75% of the time, each year so I know what to do.) I was quickly placing my laptop in the bin, folding my raincoat up, taking off my shoes, and putting my purse on the conveyor when all of a sudden, this young woman who had been in line behind me, stepped right in front of me with 2 suitcases and placed them on the conveyor. She still needed to take off her shoes – and she didn’t know she was supposed to take off her sweat jacket.

    You are probably thinking, “So what?” So what? It was rude that she thought she could just jump in front of me especially when she was not ready herself. It was not as if she said, “May I go ahead of you?” or I looked behind me and said to her, “You can go ahead of me.” I nicely told her that she couldn’t cut in front of me. Of course, she looked at me in shock and made a few comments. (I will spare the details of our back and forth dialogue.) She finally took her items and moved behind me and told me to have a nice day.

    Addressing boundaries

    A boundary in the office for an administrative assistant can be as simple as addressing a coworker or manager who constantly steps into your workspace and takes your pens or pads and does not ask or return them.  If that bothers you, you need to say something.

    Another boundary you might need to set is your accessibility after hours to your leader as far as emails go. This is becoming a huge problem. As I travel the country and talk to hundreds of administrative office professionals ranging from administrators to executive assistants, I’m hearing them say they are spending too much of their personal time (evenings or weekends) managing and/or responding to emails from their leader.  One administrative assistant, who’ll I’ll call Sue for anonymity reasons, said that originally her manager did not expect her to check business emails and take action on non-work hours.  But she wanted to get a jump on things or was curious as to what was going on or wanted to read emails on Sunday night to be prepared for Monday morning. The problem is… she started responding to her leader’s emails and taking action steps if required. Now, she is frustrated because she spends 50% of her weekend working. I told her, “She created the monster.”  It wasn’t required of her and while she thought nothing of it at first, it snowballed and now she will have to say something to her leader.

    Rules to follow

    First, do not create situations that you will later regret.

    Second, people will act as we allow them to. If you don’t say something when something isn’t right, then the person assumes it is okay.

    Third, professionally communicate when setting boundaries yet be firm.

    Setting healthy boundaries is good for you and the other person.  It teaches them how to work with you in a way that stimulates win-win situations. You feel good for reasons that are too many to even mention in this blog. A few are that you feel confident, peaceful, in control (not walked over), respected, like a peer or business partner and viewed as a leader.

    Good luck with setting healthy boundaries!

    Related:

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    The post Setting Healthy Boundaries Today appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:30:11 on 2018/02/26 Permalink
    Tags: , , Conflict Resolution, , , ,   

    Fighting Office Dragons 

    Employee_ConflictI have been speaking about office dragons for years and how to professionally deal with the dragons. Dragons were huge, dominating, fictitious creatures. Medieval writers had vivid imaginations for big, scary things. For many people, work is like a dragon. It can be overwhelming and certainly dominates well over half of our waking hours. Sometimes the people we work with can be pretty “fiery” creatures to deal with, too.

    Please join me on Thursday, March 1, 2018 | 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. PT for my LIVE E-Course, Fighting Office Dragons. Reserve your spot now.

    There are many dragon species at work. Three of the most common perceived species are leaders, co-workers, and self. We are going to look at:

    1. The behaviors of each species that makes them appear to be like a dragon. Notice, I said the word appear.
    2. How to professionally deal with your dragons.

    Leaders can appear to be dragons when they:

    • do not communicate on the employee’s level
    • give poor direction
    • show favoritism
    • do not follow through on what they say
    • do not resolve conflicts

    Co-workers can appear to be dragons when they:

    • gossip
    • convey a bad mood at the office
    • do not perform their part of a job
    • are not a team player
    • do not share necessary information

    You can be a dragon to yourself when you:

    • do not focus on the job
    • let others damage your attitude
    • do not see your own potential
    • lack confidence
    • take criticism personally

    You can do more harm to yourself with negative thinking than any outside dragon. It is your thought process and attitude that controls your internal dragon. You have the power at any time to tame your dragon and put out the fire of any dragon-like qualities.

    Here are 5 strategies you can use with any of the dragons:

    1. Act … Don’t React. Reaction cycles never end. Only when you decide to think and act independently will you progress toward your goal. Reacting is responding to your immediate feeling. It puts you at the mercy of the dragon.
    2. Stop the Mind Reading! Face it, we all move so fast that we seldom take the initiative to clarify things with others. Instead, we ponder a scenario, rolling it over and over in our minds. We “determine” i.e., mind read, what that person was thinking/motivated by/perceiving, without simply asking them to clarify.
    3. Focus on Self-change vs. Changing Others. A good first step is communicating with the dragon. Informing someone and offering suggestions can sometimes be helpful because people don’t always see their negative attitude or behavior. In the final analysis, however, every adult does as he or she chooses. When you can’t change a situation or a person’s behavior, look at changing your view about this person. You can still control your attitude.
    4. Take Independent Steps Toward Your Goals. Determine what your goals are and write them down. List the one thing you can do toward achieving those goals each day. Doing this combines the winning strategies of independent action and self-change. Setting and achieving goals gives you a sense of accomplishment. This is a positive feeling. When you feel good about who you are and what you do, it naturally flows over to others.
    5. Make Friends. You spend more time with co-workers than you do with your family or friends. People at work must become allies instead of dragons. The work relationship requires respect, honesty, confidentiality, appreciation, communication, and energy.
    6. I personally have used all these strategies and know they work. I wish you the best in dragon fighting this week. The most important thing I want you to remember is that most of the time, the dragon is in our mind.

    Joan Burge

    Please join me on Thursday, March 1, 2018 | 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. PT for my LIVE E-Course, Fighting Office Dragons. Reserve your spot now.

    This post is part of Joan’s Monday Motivators, a weekly editorial designed to kick off your week with practical ways to create a new mindset, change behaviors, develop positive relationships and thrive in the workplace with energy, effectiveness, and excellence. Sign up HERE to follow Joan’s Monday Motivators.

    The post Fighting Office Dragons appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
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