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  • feedwordpress 15:00:55 on 2019/03/21 Permalink
    Tags: , Conflict Resolution, ,   

    Administrative Assistants Working in a Team – Ask an Admin 


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    Ask an Admin is a concept that brings administrative professionals together for the best peer to peer advice from administrative assistants and executive assistants from around the world!

    This week Elizabeth comes to us with a tough question:

    Dear Admins:

    I find myself in a conundrum.  In our division, we have myself (Executive Administrator) and three Team Assistants (two in our building, and one in another state).

    After a long period of uneven support of specific local teams which resulted in the termination of a previous Team Assistant, we hired a new Team Assistant to take over the area.  Thinking to avoid a repeat performance, the candidate was interviewed several managers in the impacted area, as well as the Executive responsible and myself. The start was auspicious – lots of energy, interest and willingness to learn. We are now 15 months in and I observe there is significant departure from the first 90 days – late arrivals, early departures, unwillingness to take on work, lack of communication, dropped tasks, etc.

    I am frustrated as the remaining local Team Assistant and I invested significant time to schedule weekly lunches to ensure we meshed personally, initiated a weekly Admin Team Meeting to discuss activities and needs for backup support, and arranged a weekly all-day work-together session on Fridays to close the week and answer any questions that came up in real-time. Despite individual conversations and an intervention which included the Executive for the impacted area, the behavior does not change.

    I have come to realize that this is a management issue – lack of oversight, unwillingness to oversee the employee.  I am at a loss as to the next step. My boss, our division lead & the manager’s boss,  is informed.  The admin’s manager is not willing to manage the employee to the detriment of his teams and allows the incomplete work to spill over into the task lists of myself and the local Team Assistant. Staff members complain, but the feedback falls on deaf ears.

    What is an admin to do besides pick up the additional workload to ensure the service across teams is consistent?

    Okay, now that is a tough question! What is one to do when “all pistons aren’t firing” properly? The team is suffering because one isn’t pulling their weight and it sounds like the others are having to put extra effort into covering for this individual. Wow, very tough question!


    About Ask an Admin:

    Ask an Admin will be a weekly post on our blog that presents a question that you or a fellow administrative professional submitted to us. We will choose one question per week and post it on our blog.

    If you have a question that you would like to submit, please send it to officedynamics.aaa@gmail.com and include the name you would like us to use.

    If you want to subscribe to our blog so you don’t miss any posts, please visit https://officedynamics.com/blog/ and subscribe in the right-hand column.

    ATTENTION: If you’ve submitted your response on our Ask an Admin blog post, please be patient to see your response and other responses. We have to manually approve them to prevent spammers and profanity. If you do not see your response right away, please give it time and revisit. We apologize for this but this is the best way we can keep YOUR blog clean! Thank you, everyone!

    The post Administrative Assistants Working in a Team – Ask an Admin appeared first on Executive And Administrative Assistant Training - Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 19:00:24 on 2019/02/27 Permalink
    Tags: , , Conflict Resolution, , ,   

    How do I Deal with an Executive that Always Says Yes? – Ask an Admin 


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    Welcome to Ask an Admin! This is where any administrative assistant or executive assistant can submit any question they have and your peers can weigh in on the conversation with their advice. There is more than one way to approach a situation or problem so we would love to hear your input!

    This week Karen asks:

    How do Administrative Professionals deal with an executive who says yes to everything?

    Background info: Our new CEO says yes via meeting requests via email, text, LinkedIn, Facebook and many other social media channels and then in an email or other post tags me asking me to set up a meeting. I’m struggling since the new CEO started in November, I have a Google doc with all of the requests have come through, ranked them via importance. He isn’t making it a priority to prioritize his schedule and also he doesn’t look at his schedule, I can email, print out or text meetings and he only wants to know what meeting is next. He can also get upset if he’s not prepped properly, but if he’s not making our meetings a priority how can I prepare him properly for success in his role?

    So it sounds like Karen may have a “button masher” (someone that just clicks approve or yes without looking) and isn’t taking the time to prep himself. Wow! This is a tough one…

    Well what does Karen need to do? What can she do?

    ATTENTION: If you’ve submitted your response on our Ask an Admin blog post, please be patient to see your response and other responses. We have to manually approve them to prevent spammers and profanity. If you do not see your response right away, please give it time and revisit. We apologize for this but this is the best way we can keep YOUR blog clean! Thank you, everyone!


    About Ask an Admin:

    Ask an Admin will be a weekly post on our blog that presents a question that you or a fellow administrative professional submitted to us. We will choose one question per week and post it on our blog.

    If you have a question that you would like to submit, please send it to officedynamics.aaa@gmail.com and include the name you would like us to use.

    If you want to subscribe to our blog so you don’t miss any posts, please visit https://officedynamics.com/blog/ and subscribe in the right-hand column.

    Monday_Motivators_Home

    Monday Motivators™ is a weekly email sent from Joan Burge that gives you a little kick start to the week. These emails will include work advice, life advice, and sometimes how to find that good balance. To subscribe to Monday Motivators™ please click the button below.


    Help other administrative professionals and share this page using the buttons below!

    The post How do I Deal with an Executive that Always Says Yes? – Ask an Admin appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 17:10:28 on 2018/12/11 Permalink
    Tags: , Conflict Resolution,   

    Bouncing Back from Failure 


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    Has it been another week of adventure? A lot can happen between Monday and Friday, can’t it?

    I’d like to focus today on Turning Failure into Success. Failure is a dirty word in the corporate world. And our success-oriented society often makes it difficult for those who fail to adjust. This negative attitude often forces people to take job-related failures personally, even if they had little to do with the actual events.

    When failure occurs, many people go through a mourning process similar to that for the death of a loved one: 1) denial, 2) bargaining, 3) anger, 4) depression, and 5) finally, acceptance. While no one embraces failure, some people take it harder than others, blaming themselves entirely for their lack of foresight. Embarrassed to face their colleagues, unable to confide in their friends or family, they are isolated in their own grief.

    Thought for the week: “I will turn any failure or setback into a success!” Or, “I will encourage someone else who might be experiencing the feeling of failing, whether it is my child, neighbor, or coworker.” Has it been a great week? If not, you can still make a great one!

    Bouncing Back

    1. Acknowledge the failure. When this first, vital step isn’t taken, an atmosphere of fear is created. Instead, face your failure and see that it is an opportunity to learn and grow.
    2.  Ask for help in preventing future failures. If the guilty party doesn’t request help, it may lead this person to say, “I’ll just be more careful next time. I won’t take such a big risk again.” And that sort of thinking leads to stagnation and a loss of creativity and growth for both individuals and organizations.

    Failure can be an opportunity to reflect, rethink values and interests, and then make positive changes. People are often better off after they’ve failed because if it hadn’t been for their missteps, they might still be in the same rut.

    joan_burge_signature

    The post Bouncing Back from Failure appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 17:15:56 on 2018/11/27 Permalink
    Tags: , , Conflict Resolution, , ,   

    Decision Making 


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    Why is it that at the time we make a decision we believe it is the best, right answer or choice. Then days, weeks or months later, we regret the decision we made. We say to ourselves, “What was I thinking? However, based on the information I had at the time, I felt I made the best choice.” We will never be perfect at making decisions but we definitely need to take each bad decision or poor choice, learn from it, and commit to making better decisions in the future.

    Decision Maker

    Decision-making skill is key for productivity and growth. Your decisions take you on different paths depending upon the decisions you choose not to make as well as the actual decisions you make. Do not underestimate that even the smallest decision could change your life forever. [Read Andy Stanley’s book, The Principle of the Path for additional information on how to get from where you are to where you want to be.]

    Decisions are made daily, often without even realizing it. Some decisions are habit forming. You make the decision once and then repeat it again and again until you no longer hear yourself think or deliberate about it. An example is choosing to have a pastry at morning break daily. Your “decision” will affect your health, even your future, but you don’t even think about it any longer. 9:00 a.m. and you go get your pastry!

    When making a decision you may consider, “What would my leader do?” Having the knowledge of what your leader would do in certain situations will allow you to make a more educated decision. This, in turn, will free up your leader’s time. The more you do this kind of thinking the more empowered you become and the stronger the connection is with your leader and the organization’s need for you – a true cognitive being – as their business partner.

    In order to make a decision on anything, you must first understand the objectives and the situation surrounding the issue. Whether you are making a decision that affects your manager’s travel itinerary or involves purchasing a software package, you need to consider the objectives and purpose intended. You must set aside your own bias and needs to see the big picture. Many people are poor decision-makers because they only consider “what’s in it for me?” and they look no further. That is very short-term thinking and people around you will begin to assess that you are only in it for your own selfish and self-serving motives. That may get you a few plums, but that will not get you the prize!

    There will come a time in your decision-making journey of learning where you will have to remove the training wheels. You will have to make decisions and play them out, taking responsibility for them and being confident that you will be accountable for whatever happens. This doesn’t mean you need to “know everything” beforehand; it means you will take responsibility, shepherd them, and adjust as necessary along the way. Also, make sure you watch to observe the results, so you can learn from the results and do even better next time.

    joan_burge_signature, Contributing Author, Who Took My Pen … Again? Secrets from Dynamic Executive Assistants

    The post Decision Making appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:15:27 on 2018/11/01 Permalink
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    Successfully Overcome Challenges 


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    Determine to Succeed

    Attitudes are important to successfully overcome challenges. Right now, we have a lot of challenges facing us – the economy, companies downsizing, air travel stress, an election year on the horizon, and personal challenges. That is just life. We will always be presented with obstacles, uncertainty, and changing world events.

    Think about your challenges at work: a tough assignment, a difficult person, juggling multiple tasks and people, and learning new technologies. Your attitude about the situation will dramatically affect how you go through the situation.

    Strive for a positive attitude and use positive self-talk. Add to that: creative thinking, problem-solving, risk-taking, determination, commitment, being organized and taking action, and you will accomplish your goals.

    Here are 6 bonus strategies to embrace a positive attitude and succeed at life:

    1. Keep abreast of the economic changes taking place; they could affect your industry and job.
    2. Be a star performer at work. Companies do not want to lose their stars – or rising stars.
    3. Don’t get caught up in the negative grapevine at work.
    4. Remember, employees, don’t always know what is really going on with company changes.
    5. Stay positive. Come into work with a good attitude.
    6. Encourage co-workers to stay positive and focused.

    A quote I found years ago says, “Some succeed because they are destined to. However, most succeed because they are determined to.”

    Be determined this week to succeed when presented with a challenge. That is the only affirmation you need to live a fruitful week at work and at home!

    joan_burge_signature

    Related Attitude Management Videos and Articles:

    We would love to hear from you. Have you used any of the above strategies? What are the ways you determine to succeed and how have they helped you? Share in the comments below.

    The post Successfully Overcome Challenges appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
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