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  • feedwordpress 08:00:38 on 2020/10/22 Permalink
    Tags: , communication, , , , , ,   

    Do You Need to Learn To Be Better With People? 


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    Interacting and connecting with others is a critical factor in leadership—and among most other fields, as well. Some people have a gift for being with others easily and instinctively. But for many people, it doesn’t come naturally. If you struggle with carrying out interpersonal interactions , it may help you to know that it’s made up of specific skills you can learn and practice and master. Here are some of the most important areas you can work on:

    Develop great verbal skills. The top skill in working effectively with people is the ability to communicate clearly. That means talking less and listening more, asking great questions and learning from the answers. To develop a deeper connection with others, remember that people do their best work when they feel informed, understood and listened to.

    Learn how to assert yourself. If you have something to say, say it. Don’t make other people guess what’s on your mind, and don’t overthink and miss a chance to contribute something of value. Express yourself in a meaningful way so people can understand where you are coming from; when people understand you, they can better connect with you.

    Learn to handle conflict. Conflict is inevitable in any relationship or organization, and the way you handle conflict will show people a lot about you. The most effective strategy for resolving conflict is to do it quickly, peacefully and collaboratively. As soon as you sense that something is becoming an issue, take immediate steps to resolve it before it grows worse. Practice the art of working with others to create mutually agreeable solutions.

    Develop a memorable presence. Your presence has a direct relationship with your ability to create lasting personal relationships and build a great network. If you have a strong presence, people gravitate toward you, remember you more clearly and are more likely to want to work with you. The best way to leave an interesting and compelling impression with others is to follow the basics: make eye contact, ask questions and listen with genuine interest, be responsive, and, above all, give your undistracted attention,

    Find your confidence. If you’re anxious, nervous or worried all the time, it makes the people around you feel anxious and concerned as well. Work to look and sound confident—not arrogant, thinking you know best about everything, but genuinely confident in your authentic self, your honesty and your integrity. This kind of true confidence draws people in and inspires their own confidence, building strong relationships and communication in every direction.

    Even the most gifted of us can be better at our people skills, and remembering that truth can make a difference in how we show up in our life and leadership.

    Lead from within: Everyone wants to know how to captive the attention of others, how to hold their interest and create deep impactful relationships. As with so many other things, the way to make it happen is to build strong skills.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Do You Need to Learn To Be Better With People? appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:50 on 2020/10/13 Permalink
    Tags: , communication, , Disengaged Leader, , , , , , , ,   

    How to Work With A Leader Who is Disengaged 


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    A disengaged employee may be unproductive and ineffective, but a disengaged leader can do real damage. Those who work with disengaged leaders often feel disappointed and frustrated, even if they’re otherwise satisfied with their jobs.

    So how can you do your best when you’re working for a disengaged leader?

    First, it’s important to try and understand the origin of the disengagement in the leader’s situation and perspective. That means putting yourself in their shoes for a time. Many disengaged leaders fall into one of a few categories, and the best response for each is a bit different:

    They’re responding to an external issue. If it’s a recent development, especially if it was also sudden, it may be related to something situational, like an illness or family crisis. Ongoing disengagement is a different issue and may be related to an issue like substance abuse or long-term stress. Ask others about their perceptions, being clear that you’re coming from a place of concern, not a desire to gossip or denigrate. Many leaders are unwilling to talk about a personal issue with a subordinate, but you can still demonstrate a spirit of caring. If you’re in a position to do so, make sure that everyone on your team—including your leader—has access to information on mental health resources.

    They simply don’t know how to engage. Your leader may just be an introvert or someone for whom engagement doesn’t come naturally. The best way to engage an awkward leader is by taking the initiative. You may be able to open the door a bit, and by modeling engagement you set a good example for the leader and for your coworkers.

    They’re focused on the strategic side of leadership. Your leader may be drawn to the strategic elements of their position—things like decision-making and crafting policy—rather than directly managing people, and they avoid the part of their job that they consider too draining. Engage this type of leader with small interactions instead of long exchanges to show them that being with people doesn’t have to be overwhelming.

    They’re self-centered. Ego-driven leaders rarely look beyond their own needs and interests. If it’s not about them, they’re not interested. They’re among the most frustrating leaders to work with for a number of reasons, but it may be possible to exert a positive influence on them if their indifference and sense of entitlement aren’t already too ingrained. You may need to feed their ego to get anything accomplished, but you can help compensate for their shortcomings and set a good example for others by making sure you’re quick to give credit and encourage others.

    A disengaged leader is a serious problem. And like any serious problem, it requires careful assessment and an action plan.

    Lead from within: If you’re working with a leader who is disengaged, try to engage them. Speak from the heart and show them what true engagement feels and sounds like.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Work With A Leader Who is Disengaged appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:29 on 2020/10/06 Permalink
    Tags: , , communication, , , , Leadership Styles, , , ,   

    What is the Best Leadership Style That Outlasts All Trends 


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    As a leadership coach I’m often asked about trends in the field—which styles are current and which are growing outdated. But I don’t see leadership as a conflict between established and emerging styles but as a range of styles, old merging with new.

    At their core, I believe, most leaders are working to achieve the same things—empowering their people and building strong teams. And the leadership style that outlasts all trends, as it turns out, is a shifting balance between polarities. Here are some of the most important:

    A leader must be both a decisive planner and a creative visionary. We all know the importance of planning and decision-making in effective leadership. Stability and consistency are important to organizations. But we also need leaders who are thinking far ahead, creative visionaries who help us see what the future can be. Great leadership embodies both.

    A leader must make decisions with conviction and also be agile and flexible toward change. When we think of great leadership, we often think of someone who makes decisions with consistency and clarity. Important as that ability may be, great leaders must also be able to navigate fast-changing situations in which decisions often need to be reconsidered—and sometimes changed.

    A leader must be an expert and keep a learner’s mind. We expect leaders to know their subject matter thoroughly, to be professional and masterful at what they do, to ask the right questions and know the right answers. But leaders also need to the ability to say, “Wait, I know a lot but I’m also here to learn.” A willingness to keep learning is one of the most important traits of great leadership.

    A leader must be a great communicator and an even better listener. Leaders are called to be great communicators. We expect them to be clear and succinct, to say what they mean and mean what they say, to speak and write with clarity and purpose. But a great leader needs to know not only how to express themselves but also how to listen—an essential skill that few people bother to master.

    A leader must be both powerful and humble. Leaders need to acknowledge the power they hold by leading from the top, taking decisive action and inspiring and guiding others while being present in the day-to-day realities. But with that power should come humility and humbleness, qualities that make people feel included and considered.

    The best leadership, then, isn’t drawn from any single theory or trend but comes from learning to balance a set of constantly changing polarities. If you want to be the best leader, to embody the kind of leadership that inspires people to do their best work and seek out your support and guidance, you must be attuned in the moment. That kind of leadership will ask different things of you at different times.

    Lead from within: The leaders who are the most successful and effective are those who can recognize and balance shifting polarities of all leadership styles.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post What is the Best Leadership Style That Outlasts All Trends appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:17 on 2020/09/24 Permalink
    Tags: , , communication, , , , , ,   

    What Are Some Harsh Truths About Being a Leader 


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    Many people think of leadership as a glorified profession, one with impressive titles and lots of prestige and benefits. That may or may not be the case, but every level of leadership involves some hard truths. If you’re already in leadership, you likely know these all too well already, but if you’re aspiring to a leadership role, or if you work with a leader, keep them in mind:

    Leadership means sacrifice. Leadership at its core is about sacrifice of self-interest. True leadership is other-focused—it’s about investing in other people to help them succeed, even at the expense of your own interests. You have to put your personal priorities away and work for the good of your people.

    Leadership means constantly being judged. People are especially judgmental of their boss. Every decision you make—from promotions to project assignments to office decor—is subject to scrutiny. You have to learn not to take it personally, and that’s not always easy.

    Leadership means having to be strong for others. People come to their leader with all kinds of challenges and burdens, and it’s part of your charge to always be strong and looking out for them. Making sure that people feel supported and provided for takes an enormous amount of perseverance.

    Leadership means carrying the load. You may not have a sign on your desk that says “The Buck Stops Here,” but if you’re in leadership, it does stop with you. You’re in charge so you have to take responsibility, even when the burden is difficult.

    Leadership means making people unhappy. There will always be people who don’t support your ideas and initiatives, and some of those people may actively oppose you or be upset with your choices. You truly cannot make everyone happy or have everyone like you. The best you can do is to be honest and consistent in yourself.

    Leadership means failing visibly. Everyone makes mistakes and everyone has failures. But when a leader fails, they fail in full view of the entire team. Bad judgment calls and missteps, large or small, are right there. Everyone knows about them; there’s nowhere to hide and no excuses that will help.

    Leadership means being mindful of your influence. As a leader you need to pay attention to everything that comes out of your mouth. Your words matter, whether you’re addressing a large group, in a small meeting, or telling a joke in the hall. People will be paying attention to what you say and how you say it.

    Leadership means liking your people, even the difficult ones. As a leader, your first priority is the people who work for you, even the most difficult, the most challenging, the most unpersonable. It’s a priority that can be tough to maintain.

    Being a leader is not for the weak. You’re constantly scrutinized, judged and held to a higher standard than most people. Great leaders always find a way to make it work—and that’s what makes them great leaders.

    Lead from within: There’s no manual for leadership, no five-step process that will give you the answers. You have to sort out how to be a great leader by doing it and being it.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post What Are Some Harsh Truths About Being a Leader appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:16 on 2020/09/20 Permalink
    Tags: , , communication, , , Harassment, , , , Moral, , Unacceptable Behavior,   

    What to Do When a Leader Does Something Unacceptable 


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    After a leadership team meeting I attended not long ago, one of the executives in attendance sent an email asking to speak with me confidentially. When we were able to connect, he asked, “What do you do when someone in leadership above you does something completely unacceptable?”

    The question was disturbing, but not terribly surprising. We may think of most leaders as educated and ethically evolved, but as with any other field, there are some bad apples.

    Faced with the knowledge that a leader in your organization has done something immoral, unethical, illegal or reckless, you have a decision to make. Do you do something about it, or try to push it off to the side and continue working as before? And if you choose to do something, what’s the best way to proceed?

    Most of us want to do the right thing, but it’s not a simple choice. Here are some helpful points to consider:

    Think about the nature of the behavior you witnessed. The first step is to define whether the behavior is something you disagree with—something that violates your personal moral code—or something that’s truly intolerable. Ask yourself some questions: Is it illegal? Does it violate your industry or employer’s code of ethics? Is it an isolated one-time incident, or part of a pattern? How is it affecting others in the workplace? Read up on your employer’s conduct policies to learn about official and unofficial reporting options. You may even be required to report certain things.

    Don’t let yourself become comfortable with being uncomfortable. The first time something happens, you’re likely to feel outraged and furious. But if you choose not to say anything and it happens again, you may be a little less upset. After every instance, it gets a little easier to think of it as just the way things are. Are you OK with the behavior continuing, or is there a cycle that’s important to break?

    Think about repercussions. Whether you decide to take a stand or not, you may experience repercussions in your own career and life. Depending on the severity of the behavior, anonymous reporting options or whistleblower laws may be in effect—but it’s unrealistic to deny that integrity is often costly. On the other hand, if you look the other way and the behavior becomes public through other channels, you may be seen as complicit.

    Consider the range of options. Depending on the situation, you may choose to look for a different job, share your concerns with someone within your organization, or take official action through HR or the legal system. Whatever path you choose, keep a written record of events with as much documentation as possible. You may also want to confide in a close and trusted co-worker.

    Ultimately, you’re the only one who can decide how best to move forward without compromising who you are.

    Lead from within: Sometimes the best you can do is to change what you can, accept what you cannot, and remove yourself from the unacceptable.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post What to Do When a Leader Does Something Unacceptable appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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