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  • feedwordpress 09:00:48 on 2019/12/03 Permalink
    Tags: , , communication, Get Noticed, , , , , , ,   

    How to Get Noticed by Leadership (Without Sucking Up) 


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    If you’re like most workers, you’d like for your contributions and abilities to be more visible to leadership. But how do you get noticed without coming off as arrogant or attention-seeking?

    It’s easy for even great employees within an organization to be overlooked or undervalued. Fortunately, there are positive ways to put yourself in a position to be noticed by leadership without sucking up. Here are seven tired and true strategies for moving yourself closer to the spotlight.

    Go the extra mile. Most people will only do what they are hired to do without reaching beyond their scope of work, content with what’s good enough. But those who can walk the extra mile, who are willing to go beyond their job description and add value wherever they can, will be noticed. It’s never crowded at the end of the extra mile.

    Invest in yourself. It’s great when your company will invest in your development and growth, but what if there’s no funding or time off for professional development? You can sulk about it, or you can do something. There are plenty of ways to develop your own potential. One simple daily habit will take you far: keep up with the trends and developments in your field and send your boss links or articles that might be beneficial. This shows not only interest but also wisdom and commitment.

    Concentrate on results. Many people are so busy talking about problems that they hardly ever have time to focus on results. One of the quickest ways to make a noticeable impression is to simply deliver consistently on results. When you do, you demonstrate your value through your actions.

    Know expectations so you can exceed them. Most of us never take the time to talk with leadership about what success looks like in the role we have. Once you have that picture, you have a clear path and direction—which in turn make it that much easier to exceed expectations.

    Share your accomplishments. Work hard, put in the effort, and when you achieve success, don’t be shy about sharing your accomplishments. Leadership doesn’t always have the bandwidth to proactively check in and know everything that is happening, so communicating your accomplishments is important. If possible, meet regularly to update your leader one on one—and be sure you include a list of wins.

    Get a seat at the table: Take advantage of every opportunity to sit at the table with leadership, and create new opportunities when you can. Spending time with your superiors in a setting where they can connect with you and your work is a big step in being recognized.

    Contribute in meaningful ways. Think of ways you can contribute—not only to the organization’s work but also to its culture, and seek out leadership to discuss your ideas. Communicate clearly and concisely why you think your initiative is important and ask for support to make it successful. Not only will you be noticed in a good light, but if things go well you’ll have help in implementing your personal goals.

    Lead from within: There are many ways to be noticed by leadership; concentrate on doing the right things in front of the right people.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Get Noticed by Leadership (Without Sucking Up) appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:11 on 2019/11/28 Permalink
    Tags: , communication, , , , , , ,   

    14 Things Smart Leaders Do to Boost Their Own Confidence  


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    Even if luck played a role, top leaders are where they are because of their skills, determination and confidence. But self-confidence is something that many people—including leaders—sometimes struggle with. To help you when your own confidence starts to falter, here are 14 ways you can banish self-doubt:

    Practice it until you get it. Make building your confidence into a habit and practice it daily or even hourly. Don’t wait to think about it till you’re feeling vulnerable. The more your inner confidence becomes a habit and a practical skill, the more secure you can be knowing it’s there when you need it.

    Establish realistic self-awareness. Knowing your leadership strengths will give you confidence, and facing up to the places where you need more development will help you determine what you need to focus on to get better at what you do.

    Make the most of your mistakes, then ignore them. Mistakes are for learning, and only those who have ceased to develop never take a wrong step. Treat mistakes as a source of information and an opportunity for learning.

    Limit self-blame. Kicking yourself for past inadequacies gives fuel to self-doubt, so be encouraging with yourself as you would with someone on your team. Blaming yourself is a waste of time that could be spent moving forward with the intention of doing better with each new experience.

    Pick a role model. Choose a leader you admire. What qualities do they possess? Which of those qualities do you already have, and which do you need to develop?

    Celebrate wins. We’re often so busy getting things done that we hardly take the time to acknowledge our wins. Celebrating accomplishments is a great way to boost your confidence.

    Align your mind and body. Pay attention to your body language and your thoughts so they can be aligned and not in conflict.

    Own your strengths as well as your weaknesses. So many of us are so busy owning our weakness that we forget to own our strengths—the parts of us that are capable and competent to feel confident about what we do and who we are.

    Stretch yourself. Try something outside the scope of what you’ve done before. Stretch your boundaries, go outside your comfort zone. From discomfort comes growth.

    Be kind to yourself. Being kind to yourself is an important skill in building a leadership strategy. Issues with self-confidence are often rooted in a bad habit of punishing yourself and withholding rewards. Learn to treat yourself with kindness and your confidence will grow.

    Don’t give in to self-doubt. If you’re in a position of leadership, that’s not an accident. Know that you have what it takes to lead well and that others believe in you.

    Give yourself credit. A leader is all about making other feel inspired and motivated—but who gives the leader credit and inspiration? If necessary, give it to yourself.

    Upgrade your network. A better group of people in your network helps your leadership and builds your confidence as you connect with people who can help you develop.

    Help others be more successful. Leadership confidence isn’t just about building your own track record of successes. The essence of leadership is helping others around you become more successful. And when you do, you also help yourself.

    Lead from within: Confidence is the key ingredient of smart leadership, but it must be cultivated and development if it doesn’t exist.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 14 Things Smart Leaders Do to Boost Their Own Confidence  appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:21:06 on 2019/11/18 Permalink
    Tags: communication, , , , , understand   

    Asking someone ‘How are you?’ doesn’t go far enough 


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    I’ve often wondered the true meaning of the words “how are you”? When someone says, “how are you”, do they really care how you are or are they just being polite?

    For example, I received an email from an acquaintance that started with “how are you”, then went right into her request. I don’t think she really cares how I am.

    As a contrast, I ran into someone in the supermarket who asked me how I was. Then she followed up with questions about work, summer plans, and made me promise to give regards to my family. I think she actually cares about how I am.

    The phrase “how are you” was first recorded in the late 18th century, when it was used to mean ‘something very small and insignificant’. According to Psychology Today, whether or not you are actually interested in someone depends on a number of factors:

    • How well do you know this person?
    • Does the individual seem ill or have a history of being ill?
    • Are you aware that something has been troubling this person?

    As an example, every day I grab a cup of coffee at a local shop. Over the past year, I noticed the normally chatty checkout woman seemed unhappy. Her typical contagious smile was replaced with a silent frown. I didn’t know her well enough to ask if something was wrong.

    Fast forward about a year, her personality changed back again. She also looked different; lighter, happier and was sporting a new hair style. So, I said “you look great, I love your hair. How have you been?” I was truly interested.

    That’s when she told me she had been ill but was doing much better now. The hair wasn’t hers, but she was glad I liked it.

    Many people are private. Some don’t want to burden you with their problems. Others don’t follow up with questions to indicate that they are truly interested in what you’re saying.

    I wondered how this translates to our work lives and two very different situations came to mind.

    Situation One: We were providing leadership communications coaching at an automotive company where the sales director felt disrespected. He said he was tired of playing therapist and didn’t want employees coming to him with their personal problems. Sales were down and he blamed his subordinates. During role-playing which was videotaped, he was gruff, failed to make eye contact and was often multi-tasking instead of listening. When he spoke, he barked orders and rarely asked questions. He didn’t appear to value the opinions of others and told me, he was the boss so they should do what he says and not question his authority. Wow.

    What was apparent to me, but not to him, is that his employees didn’t like him. More importantly, they didn’t trust him. Trust and communication are centerpieces of all relationships whether professional or personal. If employees don’t trust leadership, it affects productivity and morale. When communication is one-sided, employees are less engaged which typically leads to poor performance and job dissatisfaction.

    Situation Two: I work with a global CEO I greatly admire. He’s a people person. He says all business is personal and the more interest he takes in his employees, the more committed and productive they are. Even though he can’t personally interact with 600 employees, he tries to meet with as many as possible. He said their opinions drive innovation and change. He makes it a point to have lunch in the employee cafeterias when visiting different job sites and invites employees to join him. His company boasts very low employee turnover.

    Back to the sales director. After the role-playing, I played back the tape. At first, he was defensive. Defensiveness turned into embarrassment. He said he knew he cut people off, but never realized how negative he looked and sounded. He asked how he could improve. These are the tips I shared with him.

    Tip #1: Be empathetic. It’s important to recognize that employees have personal lives and personal problems can spill over to the workplace. If it’s serious like a health condition, divorce or death of a loved one, cut them some slack and choose your words carefully. Ask them if they help, a temporary schedule adjustment or time off.

    Tip #2: Listen to understand. If someone disagrees with you, instead of shutting them down, ask questions to better understand their perspective. Perhaps they were passed over for a promotion or they’re upset over the way a project is being managed. You don’t have to change your decision but listening signals respect. You may also gain insight that could be helpful moving forward.

    Tip #3: Be present. While your responsibilities may prevent you from being present in person, the more visible you are, the more connected people will feel to you. Technology such as video conferencing has made interacting remotely easier than ever. Look for ways to engage your employees face-to-face.

    So, the next time you’re about ask someone “how are you”, think about what those words really mean. If you genuinely care, then be fully present and listen to their response. If it’s simply a nicety or expression, perhaps a simple hello will do.

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  • feedwordpress 09:00:03 on 2019/11/05 Permalink
    Tags: , Chanage Management, communication, , , , , ,   

    A Change Leader Must Do These 4 Things to Be Successful 


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    Study after study states that a change leader has a critical role in determining the success of change programs undertaken by organizations, among the different expectations from leaders in supporting change, they have found there are four elements that change leaders have to deliver to their people for change to be successful:

    The element of confidence: Change is not only inevitable, for businesses, it’s mandatory. because if organizations fail to improve continuously, they ultimately encounter serious performance gaps relative to more adaptive competitors, and to stay competitive it needs confidence, a confident leader, who is confident in their vision, strategy, and it in this self-assurance it gives those they lead the confidence to implement the change, without confidence, people would not only doubt their leader but they would doubt themselves.

    The element of clarity: To be a successful change leader, you need to tell your people the reason behind the change, which means outlining the details and scope and timelines.  Because people will first want to know how change will impact them. therefore, the best leaders go great lengths to explain the rationale behind change in the manner that can be understood by those they lead.

    The element of communication: Communication is key when you want to implement change. You cannot over-communicate when you are asking your people or organization to change. Every successful leader who has led a successful change management effort expresses the need for over-communicating during a change experience. Change initiatives often fail due to lack of good communication. Communication is paramount when it comes to change management.

    The element of consistency: when it comes to being successful in change management a leader must be extremely vigilant with those they lead, and reassure their people that during the transition times there will be alignment between what they hear and what they witness. this is where the element of consistency is the professed and enacted behavior by the leaders in the context of change. To what extent, leaders are seen as binding their own behaviors to the new norms visibly surrendering some of the hereto decision making flexibility.

    Change has a bad reputation in our society. But change isn’t all bad – not by any means. In fact, change is necessary to keep us moving, to keep us growing, and to keep us developing.

    Lead from within: Change is never easy for anyone, but if you have confidence, clarity communication and consistency it can help leaders be successful within their initiatives and those they lead.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post A Change Leader Must Do These 4 Things to Be Successful appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:02 on 2019/10/31 Permalink
    Tags: , communication, , , , , , , , , ,   

    12 Phrases That Will Help You Resolve Any Conflict   


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    Conflicts are an inevitable part of any workplace and a constant source of stress for many leaders. Conflict resolution is an important skill for any leader to master.

    Like many other challenges, conflicts can actually present opportunities for positive change. Effective conflict resolution can build deeper relationships and foster more effective communication.

    One of the issues many leaders face in conflict resolution is simply knowing what to say. Here are some effective phrases that I have coached my clients to use in times of conflict. Try them out the next time you’re faced with a conflict:

    I sense that you’re feeling emotional about this topic. Is that right? Sometimes to break tension you need to label the emotion. Never ignore emotions, because they will only escalate. Labeling acknowledges what the person feels without judgment, helping them feel recognized and acknowledged and decreasing their tension.

    Let’s take a breather before we think this through. Sometimes the best thing to do is to take a break. The word breather is deliberate—giving pause to the situation and giving everyone involved a chance to take a few deep breaths.

    Thank you for your candor—I appreciate your feedback. Most people who tell the truth don’t receive appreciation. The best way to resolve conflict is to remain open to all feedback, because resolution requires that people tell it like it is.

    I recognize your efforts and hard work. Most people are appreciated only for results, not for the effort that they put in—especially if that effort was part of something unsuccessful. If you appreciate someone’s effort you are telling them they are valuable even if they haven’t succeeded. Helping people feel appreciated and valued can establish a positive connection and help open up common ground.

    Let’s work on this problem and fix it together. This phrase is important because instead of placing people on opposite sides of the conflict, you are signaling partnership. It shows that you care not just about resolving the current conflict but also about building and maintaining a spirit of collaboration.

    Tell me more—I want to understand. Most people speak to be heard, but few take the time to understand. This phrase is powerful because everyone wants to be understood. It doesn’t mean you have to agree, just that you are willing to hear them out.

    Let’s see what we can do to make sure it doesn’t happen again. When you express concern for the work without placing blame, you shift the discussion from a defensive back-and-forth to a prevention-focused exploration.

    What can we do to change the situation? The important word in this phrase is we—it’s not about what you can do or what you can tell them to do. Using we signals collaboration instead of hierarchy and problem-solving instead of finger-pointing.

    Yes, you’re completely right. If you are miles apart, find something you can agree on together so you can start the conversation with this phrase. When people feel heard and validated, they’re more likely to engage in a constructive dialogue.

    I wasn’t aware of this—tell me more. Stating your ignorance is sometimes a good place to begin defusing a situation. Stop talking and really listen; let the other person know that you are interested in what they are saying. Keep asking questions and listening empathetically until you get to the root of the conflict.

    I am with you on that. It can be hard to hear yourself being blamed, but your willingness to be held accountable can work wonders. If you let people know you are with them, you can not only resolve the current situation more readily but also avoid future confrontations.

    How can I support you? This phrase is one that every leader should use over and over and over again—in conflict, in dialogue, in conversation, in all communication. It eases stress, defuses conflicts and sets a positive tone for relationships.

    One of the biggest mistakes leaders can make is trying to avoid conflict. Dealt with the right way conflict can be a force for positive change. It opens the channel to better communication and stronger relationships.

    Lead from within: The bottom line is that conflict will always exist, but a satisfactory resolution and positive outcomes are within your power.

     


     

    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

     

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 12 Phrases That Will Help You Resolve Any Conflict   appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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