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  • feedwordpress 08:00:54 on 2019/04/04 Permalink
    Tags: , communication, , , , , , , , Team,   

    12 Stupid Things to Stop Saying to Your Team Immediately 


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    We all have our leadership blind spots, and sometimes even the most intelligent leaders say things that are—well, just stupid. And then they’re surprised when, predictably, they get the opposite effect of what they want.

    Here are the 12 stupidest things you can say to your team, but they must be stopped immediately.

    “Do it my way.” If you hire a group of talented individuals to use their skills and expertise to do a job, then tell them to do it exactly the way you would do it, you’re bound to alienate and disempower them.

    “That will never happen.” Using the word never closes a door, and it makes you sound unprofessional and limited. Nothing is impossible—there are always opportunities and options.

    “Do you know what I mean?” It’s always important to make sure you’re connecting with people and that everyone’s on the same page, but you need to find a way to do so that isn’t condescending and annoying.

    “It’s none of your business.” Anything that pertains to the project or the team is everyone’s business.

    “That was my idea.” If you’re caught up who gets credit, you’re not concentrating on what’s important. As a team, you do things together to accomplish great things. Focusing on individuals—especially yourself—is inappropriate on a team project where the goal is a collective accomplishment and result.

    “You’re doing it wrong.” There are many ways to tell people they seem to be moving off track. It’s important to remember that people do things in different ways, so they may just be taking a different approach. If you think someone is in error, enter into a dialogue instead of making pronouncements.

    “Before you say that, let me tell you . . . ” Why would you want to shut people down or tell them not to speak? Communication is key to great teamwork, and you want to encourage people to express themselves. Listen before you speak.

    “I already knew that.” Even if it’s true, listen again. Maybe this time you’ll learn something new.

    “Because I said so.” This phrase, the hallmark of halfhearted parenting, will make people roll their eyes and lose all respect for your leadership.

    “You must have misunderstood.” Sometimes people do misunderstand, but it’s unprofessional and disrespectful to assume that a miscommunication was entirely the other person’s fault. You don’t want to make people feel they’re not smart enough to understand what you want from them.

    “What’s in it for me?” This phrase shouldn’t even be in a leader’s vocabulary. What’s in it for us? is more like it. A team is a collective, and what happens to one happens to all.

    “I’m the boss.” They know you’re the boss. And you wouldn’t have to remind them if you acted like their boss—by letting them do their job, empowering them, supporting them, and helping them develop.

    Lead from within: We have all said stupid things without being aware of them. When you’re in a leadership position, it’s especially important to think before you speak.

     

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 12 Stupid Things to Stop Saying to Your Team Immediately appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:13 on 2019/03/25 Permalink
    Tags: , communication, , , , , Succession Planning,   

    CEO Succession Starts With This One Important Thing 


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    One of the most surprising things I’ve found in my extensive experience as a leadership executive coach that most companies are missing the mark when it comes to CEO succession. And in virtually all cases the issue is the same: they’re waiting until there’s a need and looking for new leadership from outside the organization instead of planning ahead and focusing within. Looking for someone new to come in and be successful is a risky strategy. Constantly developing the leaders who are already within the organization is far more likely to lead to success.

    Continued strong leadership at the top is critical to any company’s long-term prospects. This is the succession process I recommend to my clients—one that I’ve seen carried out many times with successful results.

    Create a process. First and foremost, have a solid plan in place. According to a survey conducted by the National Association of Corporate Directors last year, two-thirds of American public and private companies said they have no formal CEO succession plan in place. And headhunter Korn Ferry reports that of the executives who talked with him this year about their CEO succession processes, only about one-third were satisfied with the outcome. These figures are unnerving. CEO succession planning is far too critical to neglect or get wrong. The time to begin planning is now.

    Produce a profile. Define the skills and talents you are looking for, the kind of candidate who will be able to deliver on future strategies and present results. This profile will keep your process grounded in the desired results and will help you select the best candidates when the time comes.

    Groom internal candidates. Choosing a new CEO is unambiguously the board’s responsibility, but the current CEO and senior leadership team have an important role in identifying and developing likely candidates within the organization.

    Generate a continuing framework. Succession planning is not a one-shot initiative. A successful succession plan should be a multiyear structured process connected to leadership development. The CEO succession then becomes the result of initiatives that actively develop potential candidates through a process that’s responsive rather than reactive. Without a structured process, potential candidates may not have sufficient time or encouragement to work on areas for development or improvement—and as a side effect, the organization may gain a damaging reputation for not developing their leaders and talent.

    Design a rotation. When I work with companies on their succession plan, we create a process in which developing leaders—especially those who have been identified as prospective succession candidates—rotate over a three-year period through key leadership roles within the organization. This cross-training gives leaders an opportunity to learn and develop within all aspects of the company, learning key skills within each role and getting to know the company from the inside out. As a bonus, a few standout potential leaders generally emerge during this process.

    Maintain a leadership development plan. Keep coaching and mentoring your organization’s developing leaders. A smart approach is to develop a plan for each candidate and feed it into their annual review, providing opportunities for supportive and constructive feedback. These tailored leadership development plans serve both the organization and the individual leaders.

    For now, the most important thing is to get started on developing a plan—or, if you already have a plan, reviewing it against best practices—regardless of the status of your current CEO. Life is uncertain, and leaders owe their organization the ability to maintain stable leadership at the top.

    Lead from within: A succession plan is not a recruiting process. It’s the responsibility of every organization to develop leaders among leaders, finding the best candidates and helping them succeed.

     


    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photo

    The post CEO Succession Starts With This One Important Thing appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 12:35:19 on 2019/03/13 Permalink
    Tags: communication, , , ,   

    How to Make Your Customers Sparkle 


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    My husband and I have been loyal to the same dry cleaner for nearly three decades. Run by a husband and wife, we’ve discussed local issues, cars, the weather and then some. The owner’s son and our son are the same age and went to school together. We refer to them as Mr. and Mrs. Sparkle because their business is called Sparkle Cleaners. Yet, recently it occurred to us, that after all these years, we don’t know their real names.

    I find this a bit embarrassing. How can you interact with people for so long and not know their names? It would easier if we recently met and couldn’t remember their names. Or, if we saw them infrequently, perhaps we could just ask them. Since that’s not the case, asking would be very awkward not to mention insulting.

    I recently read an article suggesting that forgetting someone’s name can send a signal that you aren’t interested enough to bother remembering them. A psychologist quoted in the article says it’s like telling someone they’re a zero.

    Now I really feel bad.

    So, I started to think about how this spills over into the work world. For example, my husband isn’t very good at remembering names even after he’s met people a few times. How does that make someone else feel? At work, could he be perceived as not interested or not paying attention?

    Interestingly, he’s not alone and the experts agree it’s not his fault. Psychologists say name recall isn’t a strong suit for everyone. Because names are random and not always associated with something visual, some brains struggle to remember them. Mix that up with health issues, lack of sleep and whether or not you were fully attentive all play a part.

    At work, people can be less forgiving than in social circles. Even though you felt like you were paying attention while someone was speaking, clinical psychologist Dr. Josh Klapow says it’s likely you weren’t really listening to what was being said.

    “You were looking at them, observing them, noticing them and your visual senses were overriding your auditory senses,” says Klapow. “You heard the name, but it didn’t commit to memory the way the person’s facial features did.”

    Not to mention how busy our brains are. They get so full of information that we push the so called less important things aside.

    What happens if you don’t work at freeing up space in that brain to remember names at work and get to know a little about your colleagues? For example, where did they grow up? Do they have kids? Hobbies? Where did they last work? What types of projects are they interested in?

    This is far more than small talk. It signals that you are genuinely interested in team members, employees, customers and others you may interact with. There is a difference between asking prying questions and personal questions. Prying questions about intimacy, family problems or your financial picture can be too personal. Questions that help you learn about someone’s likes, dislikes and interests help you learn about people. Taking an interest in colleagues can help build trust, rapport and foster a sense of community at work.

    That seems to be true at Sparkle Cleaners. I’ve noticed those who work there seem to care about me. If I have a tough stain, they want to know how it happened and then they go the extra mile to remove it. If a button is missing on an article of clothing, they sew it back on without charge. Even in the heat of summer working in unairconditioned shop, they never complain. Instead they enthusiastically ask about our family, activities and how we’re holding up in the heat.

    They can certainly teach us a few things about communicating in the workplace.

    Attitude

    A good attitude goes a long way. Being friendly, pleasant and helpful even on a tough day is a lot nicer than greeting people with a cranky scowl.

    Extra Mile

    Tackling an extra task, staying late or taking time out of your jammed schedule to help someone else and not expecting anything in return shows that you care. It also tells colleagues and customers that they are a priority.

    No Excuses

    It’s easy to complain about circumstances or make excuses for why you can’t get something done. It’s more rewarding to accept responsibility and put the emphasis on your customers.

    As a leader or owner, you’ll benefit from increased business and referrals. You’ll also reap a great deal of respect because you’ve respected others by prioritizing their satisfaction. That makes them feel valued.

    As I was writing this article, I decided to take my own advice and make the Sparkles feel more valued too. So, I drove to the dry cleaner. They were surprised because I had just been there so there was nothing for me to pick up. That’s when I came clean. I told them after all these years, I was embarrassed that I didn’t know their real names.

    They introduced themselves as Young and Sung Suh. As we started talking, I learned they named their business Sparkle because they want to make your clothes sparkle.

    I wouldn’t have known that if I hadn’t asked and listened. When you communicate and take an interest in others, you also gain a better understanding of your customers and colleagues. 

    Young and Sung Suh do far more than make clothes sparkle. They make their customers sparkle as well.

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  • feedwordpress 09:00:53 on 2019/02/25 Permalink
    Tags: , communication, , , , , ,   

    The Shocking Truth About Your Leader You Need to Know 


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    Are leaders born or made? That debate will never be resolved. But one thing is certain: many of the skills that make up good leadership have to be learned along the way.

    Leaders are human, and here’s the surprising truth: sometimes they simply get it wrong. And when that happens, it’s our obligation to help and guide them, whether they’re a peer or someone in leadership above us. Because, after all, leadership is a two-way street.

    Here are some ways you can help a leader who’s going in the wrong direction:

    When your leader exudes negativity, set the example by leading with positivity. Be the example the leader needs to see. Negativity limits any leader’s effectiveness. A huge part of your leadership is the energy you exude—it affects your team and your entire organization. It may be hard when you’re bombarded with negativity from your leader, but keeping your own attitude positive will help show them—and your co-workers—the way.

    When your leader becomes fatalistic, remind them that a mistake isn’t the final word. When times get tough, remind your leader of Winston Churchill’s words, “Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.” Even our leaders need our encouragement from time to time. The right message at the right moment may be the thing to jolt your leader back into the mindset they need to have.

    When your leader exhibits disrespect, show them what respect looks like. Disrespect should never be tolerated. But it finds a way to creep in, even in the best organization. When that happens, it’s important to do everything you can to stop it in its tracks. Whatever is accepted today—especially in someone in leadership—becomes the norm tomorrow. When a leader exhibits disrespect, give feedback on the consequences—in a respectful way. Ultimately you can’t force a leader to respect you, but you can refuse to tolerate their disrespect, and you can make sure your own behavior is impeccable.

    When your leader doesn’t take responsibility, remind them that they’re accountable.  When an overburdened leader shrugs off responsibility, it often results in a ripple effect throughout the company. Support your leader in the understanding that power carries responsibility not only for what we do but also for what we don’t do.

    You may be thinking, I can’t say any of these things to my leader. It’s a task that calls for a degree of courage and tact. But unless your leader is genuinely awful—and that’s rare—they’re human, just like you. And just like you they sometimes need reminders and encouragement. Those who recognize this fact and show the leadership to act on it invariably stand out from the crowd.

    Lead from within: It may be surprising to see your leader stumble, but the biggest surprise will come when you take ownership of your own leadership.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post The Shocking Truth About Your Leader You Need to Know appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:14 on 2019/02/21 Permalink
    Tags: communication, , , , , Toxic Leader,   

    How to Recognize And Weed Out Toxic Leaders 


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    You invest a lot of your time and energy into your work, and part of the return on that investment is the benefit of being led by someone you respect and admire—someone you can emulate. But of course, it doesn’t always work that way. Far too many people end up working for toxic leaders.

    As a leadership coach, I’ve seen the kind of damage toxic leaders can do. Left alone, a single toxic individual can undermine relationships, wreck teams, and destroy the fabric of an entire organization.

    A number of strategies can be effective against a toxic leader, but the first step is to identify the problem. Here are some clear signs that your leader is toxic and not just overloaded or inept:

    Toxic leaders speak but never listen. A leader who does all the talking is trying to cover up for the things they don’t know. Those who are secure in their leadership tend to listen more than they speak, because they know they can learn something new from everyone they listen to.

    Toxic leaders dismiss other people’s ideas. It’s a terrible feeling when you share an idea or direction you’re passionate about only to have it ignored or even mocked. “My way or the highway” is the motto of toxic leadership.

    Toxic leaders belittle and ridicule others. If you sit in a meeting and can hardly believe you’re hearing someone in leadership speak with such contempt to a member of their team—if you’re reminding yourself to stay silent so you don’t put yourself in the line of fire, you’re dealing with a toxic leader.

    Toxic leaders are easily frustrated by teaching, mentoring and coaching. Patience is one of the hallmarks of effective leadership. And while some are better at it than others, most great leaders love helping their team members develop and grow. Toxic leaders, on the other hand, are unable to meet people where they are without quickly becoming frustrated.

    Toxic leaders constantly micromanage. When a leader believes in their deepest core that their way is the only good option and no one else can do anything nearly as well as they can do it themselves, they micromanage. The result is that it’s difficult for others to bring forth their talent, state their ideas or even do their job.

    Toxic leaders lack social skills and emotional intelligence. Knowing how to manage their own emotions and being aware of the emotions of others are among a great leader’s biggest strengths. But toxic leaders are unaware—of self and of others—a trait that seriously disables their leadership.

    Toxic leaders take credit for other people’s work. There’s nothing more infuriating than someone taking credit for your work—especially when it’s being done by a so-called leader. The likely cause is that they don’t feel secure enough to give credit to others; if they don’t have the light always shining on them, they may feel they’re no longer in control.

    Toxic leaders blame others for their own mistakes. When a leader points fingers for their own errors, their lack of responsibility and accountability is toxic—and it often causes others to feel they are at fault. Great leaders take the blame and are accountable; they find a lesson where others see only a problem.

    Toxic leaders never admit to being wrong. How many times have you seen a leader pretend to ask for opinions when they’re really ask for validation of their own ideas? When push comes to shove their way is the only acceptable answer. It’s an attitude that breeds toxicity and demoralizes everyone, especially the smartest people on the team.

    Unfortunately, recognizing toxic leaders is easier than dealing with them. One frequently successful approach to weeding them out involves talking to them and letting them know the effects of their behavior—respectfully, so you don’t become part of the problem. The longer their behavior continues the more acceptable it becomes, and ultimately the only way out may be to find a better environment.

    Lead from within: Understanding your leaders, cultivating deep relationships with them, and supporting them can create a positive culture that will keep you and your organization on the road to success.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photos

    The post How to Recognize And Weed Out Toxic Leaders appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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