Tagged: communication Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • feedwordpress 08:00:23 on 2018/10/16 Permalink
    Tags: , communication, , , , , Speak, ,   

    How to Speak Like A Successful Leader 

    Every successful leader has their own way of communicating. The best have a powerful way of speaking, —they’ve learned how to make sure their words have positive impact.

    A leadership communication is important because the things you say can have a ripple effect throughout  your entire organization and even beyond.

    Every leader needs to find and become fluent in a set of expressions that make people feel they matter and communicate belief in them. It’s a little bit different for everyone, but here are some examples:

    “We” instead of “you” and “I.” Inclusive pronouns—“we” instead of “you” and “I”—empower others and communicate the importance of the team. They also emphasize equality and help bridge any distance between team members and leadership.

    “What do you think?” instead of “This is what I’m thinking.”  It’s easy to tell people what to do, but it’s an indirect way of saying you don’t have confidence in their judgment. Instead, let them know their ideas matter and that you believe them enough to help them stretch.

     “I believe in you” instead of “Prove yourself.” Asking someone to prove themselves can come only from a place of distrust. When you instead express your belief in someone, you give them a chance to really prove what they’re capable of.

     “Why not?” instead of “I don’t think so.” You never want to be the kind of leader who short-circuits a great idea or a new way of thinking. Work to stay open and agile enough to try new things and get new results. Don’t communicate a preference for doing the same old thing just because it gets you by.

     “We can” instead of “we can’t.” Any positive message is always better than a negative. When you stay positive and work hard you can make it happen, but saying you can’t do something tends to be a self-fulfilling prophecy.

     “Let’s give it a try” instead of “It will never work.” It’s important to give your people hope and to let them know you are willing to try something new. Trying and failing is a big part of every success story, and when you support bold choices you’re letting people know it’s OK to risk failure.

     “You can count on me” instead of “It’s not my responsibility.” If they can’t count on you as a leader, your people will never respect you. Own your responsibility and your role as part of the team. It’s that simple and that profound and that important.

     “Thank you” and “great job” instead of “OK.” When you thank people and acknowledge their efforts, even for something mundane, you are letting them know their work is noticed and appreciated. Few things make a person feel better or inspire them more.

    Lead from within: Learn to speak like a powerful leader and be careful with your words, because they are the difference between your success and failure.


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: IstockPhoto

    The post How to Speak Like A Successful Leader appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:27 on 2018/09/24 Permalink
    Tags: , communication, Disagreement, , , , ,   

    How to Disagree with Your Boss—And Still Have a Good Relationship 

    How many times in your career have you totally and wholeheartedly disagreed with your boss? It’s a tricky situation. You don’t want to hurt the relationship, but you want to do right by the company, client or customer, and you’re compelled to say something.

    So what’s the right approach? Here are some proven strategies I share with my coaching clients on how to disagree respectfully—and, in particular, how to disagree respectfully with someone who’s above you on the org chart.

    Gather feedback. Before you approach your boss, get feedback from someone you trust about your idea and how you can be more persuasive. Encourage them to poke holes in your theory and ask questions like . . . well, like a boss.

    Seek out expert opinions. Make sure you have advance contact with a subject-matter expert—someone recognized within your company or network for their knowledge of the topic. They’ll be able to provide you with a point of view you might not have thought of on your own.

    Rehearse your ideas. Practice your pitch with a few people you trust. If you you can’t get them to see your point of view, either try a different approach or consider hanging it up for a while.

    Be mindful. Once you’re ready to approach your boss, it’s important to be mindful. If the issue is something you feel strongly about, ask yourself whether it’s worth a fight if it comes to that. Remember, if you make everything combative you won’t have much to draw on when something truly important comes along. Make sure your opinions hold together logically; a clear-headed argument  is almost always better than a passionate one.

    Leave emotion out of it. Pull together data, charts, spreadsheets and any other hard evidence you can to support your point of view. Stick to the facts and don’t make it emotional.

    Listen to learn. Make it a point to listen to your boss, which is only respectful after your boss has listened to you. Most situations have something to teach everyone involved—maybe it will be you, maybe your boss, maybe both. In any case, you want to come across as someone who isn’t afraid to speak their mind but who’s driven by commitment to the organization.

    Evaluate to review.  When it’s all over, review and evaluate how well things went. Ask yourself how your role in these conversations has grown through the years. And if it didn’t go well, ask yourself what can you do better next time.

    Lead from within: Disagreeing with someone is not a bad thing. It’s how you disagree with that person, especially when it’s your boss, that matters.

    standards for hard work and integrity.

    Leadership may be hard to define and good leadership even harder, but if you can get people to follow you to the ends of the earth, rest assured—you are a great leader.

    Lead from within: Before you become a leader success is all about growing yourself; after, it’s all about growing others.


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post How to Disagree with Your Boss—And Still Have a Good Relationship appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:44 on 2018/08/21 Permalink
    Tags: , communication, , , ,   

    How To Navigate Controversial Topics In The Workplace 

    Any conversation has the potential to turn controversial at the workplace, but there are some topics that we know are likely to lead to controversy and disagreement: politics, religion, personal relationships, even family problems. But these discussions happen in any workplace where people come together, no matter what policies say.

    To respect both the rights of those who wish to express an opinion and the rights of those who may feel uncomfortable or troubled by that opinion, you need to know how you and your team can best navigate controversial topics. Here are some tips:

    Set the tone from the top. Make sure managers and senior staff respect the views of others and know how to navigate conflict. Help them remember that leadership is about making others better as a result of your presence and making sure your influence is felt even when you’re not around.

    Learn to listen respectfully. If you do more listening than talking, you’ll have fewer opportunities to say something you’ll regret or get yourself in trouble. Unless you’re in a situation where a legitimate wrong or injustice is taking place, if you find yourself wanting to say something but asking yourself whether it’s appropriate, you should probably keep it to yourself.

    Be willing to engage and be vulnerable. If you aren’t sure what to say in a particular situation, simply say so. When you speak your truth and show vulnerability, you encourage others to do so as well. Even when words fail, hearts understand each other when communication is honest.

    Seek to understand. No matter how open-minded we try to be, we all view the world through the lens of our own experiences. The key is to look beyond what we think, what we know and what we have experienced, and try to understand things from another’s point of view. Even the effort to empathize makes us more fully human.

    Redirect the heat. If someone is spewing offensive commentary or hate speech, redirect the conversation. Be low-key but firm about changing the topic. Remind people that even in disagreement everyone needs to treat others with respect.

    Become familiar with the cues. Learn to recognize verbal and nonverbal cues indicating that someone may be feeling offended by something that was said or done. Whatever the cause, the dialogue begins with the knowledge that something is wrong.

    If you hear something, say something. Rather than making assumptions or leaping to conclusions about a person’s character, sometimes it’s better to be up front and frank with someone who’s behaving or speaking offensively. This means approaching the person respectfully with a chance to talk things through. Don’t accuse but explain, and don’t yell but express. Tell them why you’re upset, explain and express yourself. If you do this with confidence it will often be effective in neutralizing a stressful situation.

    Manage your emotions. When someone says or does something that leaves you feeling upset, angry, or frustrated, be prepared with techniques to help you manage your emotions. Wait to discuss the incident until you are composed and calm, when you’re feeling less frustrated and have more patience.

    Own your mistakes. If you’re the one making people uncomfortable—even unintentionally—own up to it, take responsibility, apologize, and change the subject. Remember, you’re not the only one whose opinions and feelings matter. Sometimes feelings are hurt when conversations get out of hand, but it’s up to us to own our own mistakes and take full responsibility for them—and that doesn’t mean a “sorry if you were offended” nonapology.

    Keep the tone professional and mutually respectful. It’s important to keep the workplace professional at all times. That means making sure everyone adheres to a decorum that doesn’t allow for hateful speech, shouting matches or unsolicited strong opinions.

    Lead from within: Controversial communications are not easy to navigate. It’s the shared responsibility of everyone partaking to keep things civil and considerate.


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockphotos

    The post How To Navigate Controversial Topics In The Workplace appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 14:30:46 on 2018/08/07 Permalink
    Tags: , communication, , , , ,   

    Quick Tip #80: Mix it Up 


    Turn boring talks and presentations into brilliant ones by learning how to mix up the energy along the way!

     
  • feedwordpress 04:35:17 on 2018/06/16 Permalink
    Tags: , , communication, , , , , , , Yes   

    Stop Saying Yes When You Want to Say No 

    Most people hate saying no. Nobody likes the idea of disappointing others, but knowing when and how to say no is one of the most important skills you can cultivate. Done right, “no” can help you build better relationships and free you up to do the things that are important to you.

    Here are some ways to start building your ability to say that difficult word:

    Acknowledge that you can’t do everything.

    Trying to say yes to everything is likely to leave you trapped with no time or energy for yourself–and unable to give your best to any of your commitments. Start by selecting the things you genuinely want to say yes to–the things that build relationships with important people in your life, that align with your values, that bring you joy–and stop accepting responsibilities that don’t meet those criteria.

    Define your personal boundaries.

    Boundaries define the emotional and mental space between yourself and another person. Think of them as the gatekeepers of your personal space, and make sure that you’re clear about how much you’re able to take on. Setting boundaries, especially with people you care about, can be difficult and may make you feel guilty at first, but remember that caring for yourself helps assure that you have the energy to be there for others.

    Identify your priorities.

    To make good decisions about what to say no to, you need a clear idea of your own priorities. If you’ve left them undefined, sit down and spend some time thinking about what’s most important to you. Learning to prioritize effectively can help you become more efficient, save time, and decrease stress. Once you know what’s most important, it’s easier to decide where to focus your energy .

    Practice saying the words.

    Whether you’re declining an invitation to a party or turning down a new project at work, you can say no while still being friendly and respectful. Give yourself some ground rules and practice what you’ll say. Give a brief reason if you wish to, but don’t falter or back down. Be direct: “I’m sorry, but that’s not something I can take on now.”

    Never compromise on your integrity.

    Your integrity sets your standards and gives you a code of morality and ethics. Use it to guide you in saying no and you’ll always make consistent choices that are grounded in your beliefs.

    Know that you can’t please everyone.

    Trying to make everyone happy is a recipe for stress and frustration–and it’s literally impossible to do. You may fear that people will disrespect you or be disappointed if you say no, but most people won’t think any less of you. Remember too that in saying no you’re modeling good self-care to those around you.

    Here’s the bottom line: Knowing when to say no takes learning. Hone your skills so that you’re able to more easily recognize and deal with the situations where it’s your best response.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post Stop Saying Yes When You Want to Say No appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
esc
cancel