Tagged: Communication Skills Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • feedwordpress 21:00:38 on 2018/12/12 Permalink
    Tags: , Communication Skills, , ,   

    Joan’s Naughty and Nice List for Assistants 

     

    During a Facebook Live event Joan Burge, Founder and CEO of Office Dynamics International, had discussed her Naughty and Nice List for Assistants. This discussion highlighted many great things that can be practiced in the office as well as actions that should be avoided. In the middle of the live stream, Joan asked the viewers to give her some examples of naughty behavior practiced in the office as well as some nice behaviors.

    Be sure to watch the video for some great, funny, and “oh my gosh” kind of answers.  Special guest appearance by Melia!

     

    And here is Joan’s list!

    Naughty:

    • Not adequately preparing your executive for a trip
    • Gossip about your peers (or anyone else)
    • Take on too much work
    • Multi-task
    • Bring your bad attitude to work
    • Not be a team player
    • Withhold information from others
    • Be stagnant in your growth or education
    • Text or read messages while others are talking to you
    • Ignore signals that you are under too much stress
    • Intentionally not give your boss an important message
    • Spike your boss’s coffee

     

    Nice:

    • Give your best every day
    • Be patient with others
    • Care about your executive’s success
    • Take the initiative
    • Remind your executive of important meetings
    • Share your knowledge with your peers
    • Be a leader
    • Champion a cause
    • Make time for yourself
    • Make others look good
    • Listen to others when your opinions are different
    • Be organized and ready for your day
    • Gather a group of your peers for a mini training session
    • Let your executive know that you appreciate him or her
    • Give yourself a BIG pat on the back at the end of the day!

     

    ©Copyright Office Dynamics International 2018.

    The post Joan’s Naughty and Nice List for Assistants appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 17:15:56 on 2018/11/27 Permalink
    Tags: , Communication Skills, , , ,   

    Decision Making 

    Why is it that at the time we make a decision we believe it is the best, right answer or choice. Then days, weeks or months later, we regret the decision we made. We say to ourselves, “What was I thinking? However, based on the information I had at the time, I felt I made the best choice.” We will never be perfect at making decisions but we definitely need to take each bad decision or poor choice, learn from it, and commit to making better decisions in the future.

    Decision Maker

    Decision-making skill is key for productivity and growth. Your decisions take you on different paths depending upon the decisions you choose not to make as well as the actual decisions you make. Do not underestimate that even the smallest decision could change your life forever. [Read Andy Stanley’s book, The Principle of the Path for additional information on how to get from where you are to where you want to be.]

    Decisions are made daily, often without even realizing it. Some decisions are habit forming. You make the decision once and then repeat it again and again until you no longer hear yourself think or deliberate about it. An example is choosing to have a pastry at morning break daily. Your “decision” will affect your health, even your future, but you don’t even think about it any longer. 9:00 a.m. and you go get your pastry!

    When making a decision you may consider, “What would my leader do?” Having the knowledge of what your leader would do in certain situations will allow you to make a more educated decision. This, in turn, will free up your leader’s time. The more you do this kind of thinking the more empowered you become and the stronger the connection is with your leader and the organization’s need for you – a true cognitive being – as their business partner.

    In order to make a decision on anything, you must first understand the objectives and the situation surrounding the issue. Whether you are making a decision that affects your manager’s travel itinerary or involves purchasing a software package, you need to consider the objectives and purpose intended. You must set aside your own bias and needs to see the big picture. Many people are poor decision-makers because they only consider “what’s in it for me?” and they look no further. That is very short-term thinking and people around you will begin to assess that you are only in it for your own selfish and self-serving motives. That may get you a few plums, but that will not get you the prize!

    There will come a time in your decision-making journey of learning where you will have to remove the training wheels. You will have to make decisions and play them out, taking responsibility for them and being confident that you will be accountable for whatever happens. This doesn’t mean you need to “know everything” beforehand; it means you will take responsibility, shepherd them, and adjust as necessary along the way. Also, make sure you watch to observe the results, so you can learn from the results and do even better next time.

    joan_burge_signature, Contributing Author, Who Took My Pen … Again? Secrets from Dynamic Executive Assistants

    The post Decision Making appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 20:00:10 on 2018/11/20 Permalink
    Tags: Communication Skills,   

    Sprinkle Similes into Your Writing 

    Teaching a weekly fitness class—like writing weekly business messages—can get repetitious. A good instructor motivates action while guiding people in their exercises. My instructor likes to interject colorful similes to keep us going. I suspect it’s also her way of staying sharp and engaged, too.

    Here’s an example of her colorful use of language. Describing what not to do while on all fours, she said, “Think of an overburdened mule in a spaghetti Western movie and don’t slump your back like that.” Later, while on our tummies, she told us to lift our arms “like you’re jumping out of an airplane.” Great visual!

    Her imagery boosts our enjoyment while making the point of the exercise stick. What’s good for fitness is also good for your writing. Sprinkle similes and other figures of speech into your prose so readers can visualize your point more easily.

    Examples from a fitness class:

    “Drop your head to your shoulder like it’s a 10-pound bowling ball.”

    “Flatten your back like you could put a tray of food on it.”

    For over 50s who remember typewriters: “Shift your ribs to the side like the carriage on a typewriter.”

    Example from a book:

    This excerpt is from Martha Beck’s Finding Your Own North Star. I recommend Martha’s books for the sheer delight of seeing how she applies similes, metaphors, and other figures of speech to her points and stories.

    If you’re planning to wait for them [your family] to locate your true path, draw you a careful map, pack you a lunch, and drive you to your North Star, you might want to take up needlework. I hear it passes the time.

    Colorful similes lead to smiles. Use them in your business writing whenever you can!

     

     

    wordtrippers_grammer_course

    Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping administrative professionals add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource to quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through excellent weekly resources in your inbox, including a webinar, crossword puzzles, and a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks. Enjoy a $30 discount at checkout with the code ODI at www.wordtrippers.com/odi.

    The post Sprinkle Similes into Your Writing appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 18:00:54 on 2018/10/20 Permalink
    Tags: Communication Skills, , ,   

    Look at Your Written Messages Through an Editor’s Lens 

    Whenever you write something—a report, proposal, or sensitive email—you naturally don a writer’s hat. But don’t stop there. You’re not finished! It’s time to scrutinize and then fine-tune what you’ve crafted.

    Start with this question: Does every word contribute to conveying your intended message?

    To answer it, be sure to reread your piece (three times or more) as if you’ve never seen it before. It’s akin to “thinking like an editor” by examining every phrase/sentence and asking:

    Is it NECESSARY?

    Is it CLEAR?

    Is it CONCISE?

    If you can’t confidently answer YES to these questions, pay attention to the following fixes and use them wherever it’s appropriate.

    NECESSARY: Be picky and picky again. Delete whichever elements don’t support the piece’s meaning.

    CLEAR: Ensure subjects and verbs agree; no mixing singular and plural. For example,

    • Incorrect: A group of writers were in town. (“Group” is singular while “were” is plural.)
    • Correct: A group of writers was in town. (“Group” is the subject here, not “writers.”)

    CONCISE: Whack wordiness by getting rid of extraneous phrases and words that add no value—e.g., really, some, great, very, that. Change these wobbly words to something specific and/or descriptive that gives readers more information. For example,

    • Let’s add some examples to the report.
    • Let’s add 12 examples to the report.

    By looking through your editor’s lens, you can make sure every word counts toward getting your message across.

     

    writing_tips

    Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping administrative professionals add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource to quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through excellent weekly resources in your inbox, including a webinar, crossword puzzles, and a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks. Enjoy a $30 discount at checkout with the code ODI at www.wordtrippers.com/odi.

    The post Look at Your Written Messages Through an Editor’s Lens appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:15:22 on 2018/10/16 Permalink
    Tags: , Communication Skills, ,   

    Should You Let Your Boss Shift the Blame to You? 

    Question: “My boss recently shifted blame in my direction for some mistakes in a print campaign, when the problem was actually some simple miscommunication between us. She didn’t blame me directly or maliciously; she just conveniently left out some facts when describing the problem to her superiors, and that made her look a little better at my expense. What should my reaction be? How much ‘bad press’ should I be willing to absorb for the sake of helping her out, since helping her out is my job?” 

    – Daphne, Public Relations Assistant

     

    See comments below, and send your own question to editor@adminprotoday.com.

     

    This post was shared by our friends at Business Management Daily.

     

    The post Should You Let Your Boss Shift the Blame to You? appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
esc
cancel