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  • feedwordpress 18:45:49 on 2019/04/09 Permalink
    Tags: Communication Skills, , ,   

    Managing Multiple Managers 


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    managing_multiple_managers

    Managing multiple managers can be daunting. But that is the norm today. 90% of administrative and executive assistants support more than 1 person. It is a luxury if you only support one executive or manager. I know some administrative assistants who support an entire department of 60. However, they are not providing support every day to each person. Obviously, that is impossible. The tips below are for supporting a group of managers on a regular basis. Being an excellent communicator and being organized are vital skills to managing multiple managers or executives. I hope these tips help you.

    1.   Encourage managers to use uniform procedures. It really helps keep things simpler when everyone uses similar procedures.

    2.   Limit personal tasks for managers. Learn to say “no.”

    3.   Treat each manager fairly and with respect, despite your personal preference. You may not like everyone you support, but you do need to treat each person equally.

    4.   Understand each leader’s unique work style. While you may encourage uniform procedures, do pay attention to the work style that best suits each manager.

    5.   Establish a priority list for all your principal supports to see; update it frequently. Either post this in a common area or distribute it weekly. This allows all the leaders you support to be aware of what and how many project you are involved in, and it helps them understand why their work isn’t turned around in one day.

    6.   Communicate regularly with all your managers. Be sure to inform them of any delays.

    7.   Except for time-critical projects, do the senior manager’s work first.

    8.   If your managers are on the same level, complete the task with the earliest due date first.

    9.   Find out what projects are coming your way so you can plan accordingly.

    10. Ask your managers to give you project materials as sections are ready. This will help avoid any last-minute rush.

    What do you think? Do you have some great tips to share on how to manage multiple managers? 

    The post Managing Multiple Managers appeared first on Office Dynamics - Executive And Administrative Assistant Training.

     
  • feedwordpress 20:10:13 on 2019/04/04 Permalink
    Tags: , , Communication Skills, , , , ,   

    How to Help Your Manager Get Things Done – Ask an Admin 


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    training_for_administrative_assistants

    If you are an Administrative Professional looking for your questions to be answered by your peers, then this is the place for you! This is the best blog for advice for administrative assistants and executive assistants provided by Office Dynamics International.

    This week Renee C. asks:

    As an administrative assistant, how do you get your supervisor to complete his tasks and get things done, especially in a timely manner and meet deadlines? I’ve tried everything from whiteboards of projects to various types of folders with deadlines, to scheduling time in outlook, sending reminders (email, outlook, paper) to standing weekly meetings with him. Things don’t get done nor do they get done in a timely manner. I don’t know what other methods and/or processes to use.

    Wow! Ok, Renee is wondering how does an administrative assistant manage her manager or executive? Does Renee start with managing deadlines, learning how to schedule properly? Or does this frustrated administrative assistant need to build on her partnership with her executive? How do you help your manager get things done?

    We have several tools that actually can help with this but we want to see what you have to say!


    If you have a question that you would like to submit, please send it to officedynamics.aaa@gmail.com and include the name you would like us to use.

    If you want to subscribe to our blog so you don’t miss any posts, please visit https://officedynamics.com/blog/ and subscribe in the right-hand column.

    If you’ve submitted your response on our Ask an Admin blog post, please be patient to see your response and other responses. We have to manually approve them to prevent spammers and profanity. If you do not see your response right away, please give it time and revisit. We apologize for this but this is the best way we can keep YOUR blog clean! Thank you, everyone!

    The post How to Help Your Manager Get Things Done – Ask an Admin appeared first on Executive And Administrative Assistant Training - Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:15:58 on 2019/03/26 Permalink
    Tags: , Communication Skills   

    Administrative Assistants Working on a Team – Ask an Admin 


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    training_for_administrative_assistants

    Ask an Admin is a place where administrative assistants and executive assistants can get advice…from each other! This peer to peer interaction allows us to not only make the administrative profession stronger but it also gives us a great way to network and interact with one another.

    This week Ms. G presents a tough scenario:

    How do you deal with a write up in your performance evaluation that states:  Continue to work as a team player with Administrative Specialist staff to collectively resolve scheduling conflicts and achieve the common goal of more frequent communication to provide exemplary support to the office. 

    ***When your co-worker won’t talk to you to handle scheduling and you have addressed it several times over the years? She is the Senior Administrative Specialist in the office.

    Ok, that’s a pretty tough one. How do you communicate with someone that is not being a team player and communicating back or effectively?


    About Ask an Admin:

    Ask an Admin will be a weekly post on our blog that presents a question that you or a fellow administrative professional submitted to us. We will choose one question per week and post it on our blog.

    If you have a question that you would like to submit, please send it to officedynamics.aaa@gmail.com and include the name you would like us to use.

    If you want to subscribe to our blog so you don’t miss any posts, please visit https://officedynamics.com/blog/ and subscribe in the right-hand column.

    ATTENTION: If you’ve submitted your response on our Ask an Admin blog post, please be patient to see your response and other responses. We have to manually approve them to prevent spammers and profanity. If you do not see your response right away, please give it time and revisit. We apologize for this but this is the best way we can keep YOUR blog clean! Thank you, everyone!

    The post Administrative Assistants Working on a Team – Ask an Admin appeared first on Executive And Administrative Assistant Training - Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 19:30:32 on 2019/03/20 Permalink
    Tags: Communication Skills, , ,   

    Coaching for Executive Assistants and Administrative Assistants 


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    coaching_with_your_executive

    I am happy to say that more executives are investing in their assistants by providing one-on-one coaching for them. Over the past two years, Office Dynamics has done more on-site coaching for executive assistants than we have done in the past seven years! And we continue to get more calls for this type of work.

    I love it when an executive is willing to make this kind of investment. It says that the executive and organization truly value this assistant and want to give them the tools to help them be even more effective. Typically, how this happens is that an organization will call Office Dynamics and their HR or executive will talk to us specifically about the situation or what skills they would like their assistant to develop. We provide executive assistant coaching on everything from being more assertive to professional image, communications, leadership, time management and building a partnership with the executive.

    When I or one of the Office Dynamics trainers goes on site, we sit at the assistant’s workspace for at least one day and sometimes two days and observe everything that goes on in the space. We learn how the assistant manages day-to-day processes and make recommendations for greater efficiency when necessary. We observe how the executive and assistant interact and how they manage their day. We spend private time with the assistant to learn what works well for him or her and what creates barriers to their productivity.

    After several hours of working with the assistant, we meet with the executive and the assistant to share our observations and our recommendations on how they can work more strategically and increase productivity on both sides. The last step is we help the assistant write a Professional Development Plan. This is detailed and maps out specific action steps the assistant will take. We use this information for a 30-, 60- and 90-day follow-up call with the assistant and the executive to track progress.

    Some of the changes we have seen take place are:

    • Communication with CEO
      • Had business cards made for myself and gave to CEO to travel with and distribute
      • Expressed ideas and opinions to improve processes
      • Clarify instructions to prevent rework
    • Managing CEO’s email
      • Re-edit subject line
      • Archiving old email
      • Set up priority Alert on mobile
    • Calendar Management
      • View calendars with a holistic approach
      • Enforcing my role as manager of the calendars
      • Implemented meeting/events and speaking engagement checklist
      • Pay attention to post meeting action plan, follow up
      • Constantly confirming and reconfirming meetings in case of any changes
    • Managing CEO’s office and personal life more seamlessly
      • Created a process to manage CEO’s life while I’m away
      • Continuous reminders given
      • Implemented ABC priority with work load but priorities constantly get shifted as more tasks are added
      • Successfully organized workspace
    • Create an environment that people are cognitive of my authority
      • Boundaries established
      • Assertive communication with colleagues
      • Redirect people to other resources
      • Reinforcing office policies

    On-site coaching is probably the most effective way to create change specific to an assistant’s situation because we are right here in your space seeing exactly what you deal with and how your day flows. The payoff is huge.

    Should your executive ever bring in a coach for you, see it as a good thing! On the other hand, you might request some private coaching. If in person is beyond your budget, we also provide coaching via conference calls. You may also want to invest your own funds to enlist a coach. I have had various types of coaches since I was in my 20s. They were always a great investment for me.

    joan_burge_signature

    The post Coaching for Executive Assistants and Administrative Assistants appeared first on Executive And Administrative Assistant Training - Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:15:42 on 2019/03/19 Permalink
    Tags: , , Communication Skills, , ,   

    Administrative Professionals Not Getting Respect – Ask an Admin 


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    training_for_administrative_assistants

    Ask an admin is your place to ask your question and have other administrative professionals, from around the world, give you their advice based on their experiences.

    This administrative professional, Seething in the South, asks us:

    What do you do? How do you handle…..a Manager who doesn’t acknowledge or respect my contributions? This isn’t the first time I’ve been dissed.

    Part of me says to put on your big girl pants and ignore it—AGAIN, and part of me says address it to clear the air, but then be labeled a typical, needy, overly-sensitive female (yes, he’s a known chauvinist).

    This happened yesterday:

    One of my responsibilities is coordinating all of our Company finances into a Quarterly Report with a lengthy CEO letter that all gets processed in In-Design. I’ve been doing it for many years.

    I have been requested to cover for the CEO’s EA while on maternity leave. I needed to prepare the Board Presentation and communicate directly with our the EAs of our outside Board members. I was honored as it’s a highly-visible project and was up for the task. It also meant I needed to learn a completely new data-sharing software package. It’s a very busy time for me because the Quarterly Report gets processed at the same time but I knew I could do it and I did.

    Long story, my Manager sent a thank you, great job, presentation was great, etc. and you all can take a day off an email to the entire team working on this, except for me. I found this out because a recipient of the email forwarded it to me. I’m upset because I went above and beyond to get this done and didn’t even get a thank you. No acknowledgment that it was a lot of extra work and learning outside of my normal. I could care less about the day off...but a little thanks goes a long way.

    SEETHING IN THE SOUTH

    Oh my. What an interesting situation. Here we have an administrative professional that sounds like she did an amazing job covering and learning what was necessary but wasn’t thanked accordingly. So, how do we address this? Or do we because it’s expected that have to go above and beyond in situations like this? What do you think this seething administrative professional should do?


    About Ask an Admin:

    Ask an Admin will be a weekly post on our blog that presents a question that you or a fellow administrative professional submitted to us. We will choose one question per week and post it on our blog.

    If you have a question that you would like to submit, please send it to officedynamics.aaa@gmail.com and include the name you would like us to use.

    If you want to subscribe to our blog so you don’t miss any posts, please visit https://officedynamics.com/blog/ and subscribe in the right-hand column.

    ATTENTION: If you’ve submitted your response on our Ask an Admin blog post, please be patient to see your response and other responses. We have to manually approve them to prevent spammers and profanity. If you do not see your response right away, please give it time and revisit. We apologize for this but this is the best way we can keep YOUR blog clean! Thank you, everyone!

    The post Administrative Professionals Not Getting Respect – Ask an Admin appeared first on Executive And Administrative Assistant Training - Office Dynamics.

     
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