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  • feedwordpress 11:58:36 on 2019/09/26 Permalink
    Tags: Collaborative Economy, Off Planet   

    Tech Trend: Rent a Satellite from These Companies 


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    Photo by NASA on Unsplash

    This is an important trend: imagine having a birds-eye view of your home, commute, company, supply chain  or competitors.

    Recently I gave you the What, Why & How of Satellites as a Service. Now, I’m going to break down the current players in the space – pun intended.

    Quick recap – You can now “own” your own satellite with Satellites as a Service. Rent space on someone else’s satellite. The sharing/collaborative economy has gone to space. 

    It’s key we understand this trend, as this data-service will provide incredible troves of information about your customers and competitors — and they will get access to this information, too. 


    Ground Station
    Founded201020192012
    Key ExecutivesChris Boshuizen, Robbie Schingler, Will Marshall (all ex-NASA)Shayn HawthorneJeroen Cappaert, Joel Spark, Peter Platzer
    Funding$351MPrivate funding$159M
    # Employees430Unknown101-250
    Key FactsBusiness model: Subscription services formonitoring, tasking, analytics, imagery
    140 satellites in orbit (deployed over 350 since 2013)30 ground stations30,000 users400 customers40+ countriesMaintains a 7+ petabyte imagery archive
    Business model: Control satellite communications, process data

    2 ground stations live10 more ground stations by end of 2019Expects to lower cost of satellite control services by 80%
    Business model: Space to cloud data & analytics, orbital services, visualization

    84 satellites in orbit30+ active ground stationsFocus on tracking global weather, ships and airplanes

    So, who’s doing what?

    Planet is different than the others because they provide universal access to imagery of the entire planet. They are “using space to help life on earth.” Their earth-imaging satellites have successfully mapped the entire planet. 

    You can access their imagery through different products: Global Monitoring (daily, monthly, quarterly), Tasking – requesting specific actions, or Analytics – where the imagery is turned into insights, for example for Roads, Buildings and Vessels.

    The industries they focus on include Agriculture, Defense & Intelligence, Energy & Infrastructure, Insurance and Maritime. Their archive goes back to 2009. 

    Amazon’s AWS Ground Station just went live at the end of May. Unlike Planet, Ground Station offers on-demand satellite access where you can control satellite communications and scale your own operations without managing your own ground station infrastructure. 

    It is satellite operators that are using the ground station service. Currently, they run their own ground stations. But, this service will provide faster speeds at lower costs. This allows operators to access data in near real-time. They control their satellite through the ground station, then downlink data from their satellite to the ground station, then process the data on their cloud storage and computing services. 

    Amazon’s Ground Station service offers pay-as-you-go access to its own global network of antennas, aiming to reduce ground station expenses to startups by up to 80 percent. The plan is to also reduce the time it takes for satellite data to be processed, analyzed, and forwarded to operators and their clients because the stations will be co-located with Amazon’s data centers. 

    The current AWS Ground Station customers include the leading satellite operators: Capella Space, D-Orbit, Maxar Technologies, Myriota, NSLComm, Open Cosmos, Spire and Thales Alenia Space.

    Spire focuses primarily on tracking global weather, ships and airplanes. They have 80+ CubeSats in orbit. Spire’s focus is on providing data – identifying, tracking and predicting the movement of the world’s resources and weather systems so that businesses and governments can make smart decisions.

    Honorable mentions: Capella Space and BlackSky.

    Satellites as a service is no longer a ‘some day’ wish. The data and visualization is here today for your business. Keep your eyes on these players as they continue to push the boundaries of outer space.

     
  • feedwordpress 14:07:54 on 2019/01/04 Permalink
    Tags: Collaborative Economy, ,   

    Roadmap: Five Phases of Digital Eras 


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    Five Phases of Digital Eras

    Roadmaps directionally guide us when situations are unclear. To guide me, I often used this framework in client work, speeches, and beyond. It serves us to see how technology is rolling out in our lives, as Scott Monty said, it could a “chart of your life”. It’s not just for me, it’s for all of us to use in our personal and professional planning.

    As we approach the anticipated recession, now is a good time to publish this roadmap, as we’ve seen economic conditions shape each era. For example, in the Internet Era, the dot coms experienced a shakeout in the 2001 recession. Next the Social Media era became a low-cost channel in the next economic downturn and the collaborative economy birthed in the 2008 recession as people struggled to stay in homes, and get what they needed, cheaply.

    The same will happen in the next recession, technologies will reduce costs, increase efficiency, and humans and businesses will turn to them to increasing their adoption at an exponential growth rate.

    It’s worth noting that these eras often happen in overlapping waves. One era doesn’t start and stop, they overlay each other, and obviously interact with each other. For example the Collaborative Economy era (like Uber) will soon become the Autonomous World era, as the cars become self-driving.

      Internet era Social Media era Collaborative Economy era Autonomous World era Modern Wellbeing era
    When: Mid 90s, “popped” in 2001. Currently a matured market; nearly all internet users access these services. Gained traction in 2005, gained market adoption during 2008 recession, most internet users use these platforms multiple times a day. Many companies birthed in 2008 recession, when people were resource strapped. Undergoing growth for decades, there have been many surges and ‘winters’ Early Fitbit emerged in 2007, Nike’s Fuelband emerged in 2012, spurring a craze. Since then hundreds of wearables attracted mainstream attention.
    Description: Every media, business, and entity created a website to share information and enable commerce; “dot com” boom. Free, low-cost people-created media, and used by marketers to reach customers. Peer-to-peer commerce platforms emerged during recession, enabling people to get what they needed from each other. AI technologies simulate human intelligence by replacing and augmenting simple repetitive tasks to more complex problems. Consumer accessible technologies improves humans minds, bodies, physical spaces around them, and communities.
    Technologies: Easily accessible browsers, web software, hosting, network technologies RSS, ratings, commenting, publication tools. Mobile apps, geo-data, online payments, ratings and reviews, marketplace software Machine learning, big data analysis, advanced computing. IoT, devices, apps, machine learning, and prior digital eras
    Benefits: Birth of business to consumer ecommerce. Peer to peer communication changed the flow of information power. Near real time services, sharing of resources can improve sustainability, human connection. Reduce humans painful toil of hard labor, repetitive tasks –solve complex problems Humans can improve mental capability, increase longevity, enjoy happier, more content lives with their loved ones.
    Downsides: Many failed startups from lack of monetization, “dot bomb”. Traditional retailers and middleman struggle to compete. Privacy woes. Monetization of user data in questionable ways. Digital addiction, psychological damage, social dynamics changed. The sharing companies and their investors became 1%ers, some models increased congestion, and workers rights often trampled Top fears include: robot overlords enslave humans, job loss, lack of human/work purpose, unforeseen ethical dilemmas The concerns over data privacy and over reliance on technology in our lives continues to grow.
    Winners: Google, eBay, PayPal, AOL, Alibaba, Amazon, Netflix Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, WeChat, Weibo, Snap, YouTube, blogging platforms. Uber, Airbnb, Lyft, BlaBlaCar, Ola, DiDi, Careem, Lime, Bird. Fiverr, UpWork The race is far from over, but current leaders: IBM, Palantir, Google, Amazon, Apple, Nvidia This battle is still being fought, but Apple, Google, Calm, Headspace, 23andMe, Ubiome lead the market.
    Losers: Thousands of “dot bombs” and their investors. Users privacy, journalism, governments and marketers who failed to adapt. Some on demand workers. Traditional companies who failed to adapt. Workers who conduct repetitive tasks. Traditional medical, health, pharma and insurance companies who don’t adapt to these consumer technologies will lose out
    Future: These large companies are laying foundation to support –but not always lead– in the other eras Leading platforms must adjust business model for autonomous world era. Balance user and gov needs. Workers who perform repetitive tasks will be replaced by autonomous systems. These autonomous technologies will continue to creep into our lives, businesses and society, indistinguishable from most human services. These technologies continue to integrate with our bodies, where we become reliant on them, a form of cybernetics

    In prior versions, I had the first three eras, four eras, then added in the fourth. While I’ve been eyeing the fifth era, Modern Wellbeing era, for about a year (prior we called this a quantified self), I waited until the right time to publish this in public. With many mindfulness apps and features emerging, new devices that measure heart rate variability and others coming, I can see how this trend is starting to develop.

    With that said, what’s the six era? I’ve some early ideas, but it would appear as unrealistic science fiction at this stage. Love to hear your reactions to this view of how technology is going to roll out. Which era are you currently focused on? How will you plan for the next phase?

     
  • feedwordpress 15:20:25 on 2017/01/26 Permalink
    Tags: , Collaborative Economy   

    Automation Is the Next Phase of the Collaborative Economy 


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    This may come as a shocker to many, but in the next few years, the peer-based sharing/collaborative economy will shift to automation.

    I’ve studied this market closely and want to make some clear predictions on where things will head. Four years ago, I mapped out the Collaborative Economy, which is the phase where humans get what they need from each other (peer-to-peer commerce). In the next phase, the Autonomous World, robots will augment and replace humans, and they will serve humans. In some cases, robots will serve other robots as we advance further.

    The transition from traditional business models to the Collaborative Economy and ultimately to the Autonomous World is already creating ripples throughout the world. We are in the midst of global disruption due to widespread mobile Internet and cloud technology, vastly improved processing power and Big Data, and the rise of the sharing economy and crowdsourcing, according to the World Economic Forum. These changes have prompted new waves of geopolitical volatility and the creation of a new middle class in emerging markets.

    These innovations are now spawning new energy supplies and technology, the Internet of Things, advanced manufacturing and 3D printing, and societies that live longer — all of which are quickly altering expectations about the future.

    The next turn is likely to produce robots and autonomous transport, AI, and breakthroughs in advanced materials and biotechnology. These represent a new frontier that may only be a few years on the horizon. WEF posits that the world could look fundamentally different by 2020.

    Let’s indicate how timely this is, and how it lines up with what we see.

    How the Collaborative Economy will shift to Automation

    Category Automation Phase Examples Impact
    Ride Sharing

    (Uber, Lyft, Didi, Ola)

    Self-driving cars are quickly emerging, most by 2021, from many car manufacturers Uber has experimented with cars, Lyft’s bold pronouncement, and Didi Professional drivers will need to upskill and find a new career
    Delivery

    (Postmates, Instacart)

    Wheeled and flying drones will deliver packages, beyond humans Starship, based in my area, is delivering food, and Amazon’s patents are inspiring Postmates, Instacart and other couriers will be displaced by robots
    Home Sharing (Airbnb, VRBO, HomeAway) Home automation will enable hosts to offer hospitality without being present Airbnb could offer digital locks, Wi-Fi management, digitized home appliances, and more Hosts can manage more properties, and guests get a personalized experience
    Online Service Marketplaces (Upwork/Freelancer) Simple AI bots will complete rote tasks currently performed by online service providers While a plethora of early-stage bots have emerged from M, Alex, and Watson, advanced AI to conduct intermediate tasks hasn’t emerged Online workers will need to specialize their skills for project or robot management, human-based design, community skills, and humanities
    What’s next? Anywhere repetitive tasks exist but could be automated Simple machines will replicate human behaviors Jobs will be lost, so humans must upskill or specialize in humanities

     

    The implications of these coming changes will likely have a profound effect on the people of the world. Here are some concrete observations:

    1. Only some, not all, humans will be able to upskill, unlike other social economic revolutions. Humans could grasp industrial revolution roles as we shifted out of agriculture because they were taught single repetitive jobs. The challenge now is that robots will always learn faster than humans, as they are networked and can process faster and work at an accelerated pace.
    2. The world will need solutions to unemployment. From a nonpartisan standpoint, the next threat to Western employment isn’t offshore workers but the rise of automation. Predictions from the former White House administration predict that automation could replace 83% percent of lower paying human jobs. The impact to other nations that will develop these automated technologies are also at hand, they must prepare for changes in society and their economy. Humans will need to redefine what purpose means, for those where human labor is the primary driver.
    3. The impetus to push for universal basic income is at hand. The experiments are happening in Finland, Oakland and more, proposing such a policy would provide every human — regardless of age, gender, educational attainment, or intelligence — with a guaranteed living wage to cover basic needs: food, shelter, and clothes. For anything else they want, they will have to earn it. The companies that own and/or profit from these technologies should be taxed to cover this societal benefit. The robots should not only provide more resources to the planet for cheaper, but they should also fund a quality life for others.
    4. Who will maintain employment: Those who manage robots, humanities, nonlinear roles. While we actively try to teach our children coding, technology is quickly advancing that robots will be able to self-code. This means that understanding how to manage systems of robots towards solving problems will be key. Secondly, arts, humanities, entertainment, sports, psychology and other softer skills will rise to the forefront as skills that are needed. It’s assumed that robots will replace many repetitive and rote jobs, humans that can solve complex tasks that are constantly unique, will thrive.

    In summary, Uber, Lyft are ushering in self-driving cars and a wave of automation that will cascade across the broader ecosystem as humans are augmented then often replaced by robotic systems.

     
  • feedwordpress 18:54:12 on 2016/12/12 Permalink
    Tags: Collaborative Economy   

    Industry Impacts of Airbnb’s Shift to Experiential Business Models 


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    The future of Airbnb lies in creating memorable guest experiences, and brands will benefit by complementing these experiences in relevant, valuable ways.

    Since attending Airbnb Open in Los Angeles a few weeks ago, I’ve been contemplating what Airbnb’s announcements around shifting toward experiential hosting mean for both guests and corporations. Guests will find authentic travel experiences that complement their hospitality choices, while corporations will find opportunities to partner with Airbnb and sponsor these entertainment and cultural adventures.

    During the event, executives from Airbnb revealed a few interesting data points:

    • The average business traveler stays at an Airbnb for six nights
    • The average Airbnb host makes $7,530 per year
    • Travel spending is nearly 10% of global GDP ($7.2B)
    • Airbnb had 40M guest stays in 2015 (see graph below), in 34K cities in 191 countries

    screen-shot-2016-12-12-at-10-51-51-am

    With guests staying for nearly a week at their hosts’ abodes, many are looking for immersive experiences in the local scene––activities and sights that can’t be booked through a travel agent or seen from a tour bus. There are already more than 600 experiences available to travelers through Airbnb! The company is also experimenting with on-demand car delivery for off-the-beaten-path travel, as well as prepared food delivery.

    What does this mean to you? Corporations have the opportunity to connect directly with tastemakers around the world, inserting their brands and products into diverse experiences with lasting impact. Let’s explore a few of the potential industry opportunities:

    • Consumer Goods: Airbnb is the world’s largest showroom, with the goods in hosts’ homes used to influence buyers as the level of trust between guest and host are high.
    • Retailers: These new “experiences” mean that local retailers will be visited in cities, led by the hosts and tour guides.
    • Hospitality and Travel: For hotels, this new offering is about the entire trip, and they’ll soon offer flight deals and cars, in addition to experiences and homes.
    • Food: Food will be delivered directly to Airbnb locations, and continued on-demand food models will become important.
    • Finance: Hosts are generating a modest amount of income per year, but need money to upgrade their locations, an opportunity for small loans.

    What does this mean for all companies? Today’s modern customer is seeking experiences, they show off using digital technologies, and access to physical goods is easy with on-demand models, rather than ownership of a house, car, electronics and more. Established companies need to revisit their strategy to provide customers with experiences that connect to the real meaning of why customers want platforms that enable new adventures and more.

     

     
  • feedwordpress 10:41:41 on 2016/10/31 Permalink
    Tags: , Collaborative Economy   

    So Who’s Really Going to Own Autonomous Cars? There’s Four Scenarios. 


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    160603_ft_self-driving-car-mercedes-jpg-crop-promo-xlarge2

    Above: Mercedes Benz Autonomous Car

    Two mega trends are coming together: The Collaborative Economy and the Autonomous World, which means shared mobility from self-driving cars.

    Early this year, we published a research report on the Business Models of Self-Driving Cars, and we’ve presented our findings at a number of industry events. A commonly asked question is: “In the future, will we even own cars?” I want to share a few scenarios that are likely to emerge.

    Today’s 3-year-old toddlers are unlikely to ever learn how to drive. With autonomous cars already making their debut now, and then en masse in 2021, per Ford and others, these toddlers are unlikely to require driving skills in the year 2031.

    Here are four scenarios of car ownership that could play out:

    1. The on-demand model, a.k.a. “Uber/Lyft” model. In this model, autonomous cars would be like a “utility” where most don’t own them, certainly in cities; they are summoned on demand.  John Zimmer, the CEO of Lyft, put forth a visionary piece where most city dwellers do not own cars in cities by the year 2025. Uber’s executives paint a future where mobility is like any other utility, where at a “twist of the tap,” mobility can flow out of a nozzle. In urban areas, home garages could be converted to living space (or Airbnb rentals), and large multi-story garages could be converted to green spaces.
    2. The shared car model, a.k.a. “Zipcar” model. A group of cars are available in a convenient regional area, where many can share and own these cars. For example, some progressive apartments now have shared vehicles in their garage for renters. In this model, a group of neighbors could invest in the commonly owned costs of these cars, and share insurance, car ownership, and maintenance costs. We’ve seen a growth in P2P insurance models, which could further enable this market.
    3. The wholly owned model, akin to current ownership. Just as we currently own most vehicles, we could continue to own vehicles in the future, but they will self-drive. This makes the most sense in rural areas and, to some degree, in suburban areas. Some people with families that have specific car seat or mobility needs (the elderly, those with wheelchairs, etc.) may require their own self-driving vehicles. Others we have spoken to suggest that human-driven cars will only be owned by the very rich — or very poor — similar to how horses are owned today.
    4. Autonomous cars own themselves. Also called a distributed autonomous organization (DAO), self-driving cars could become sentient creatures in the radical future that can not only self-drive and self-charge, but also then take themselves to be repaired at a local garage, and pay for it on their ownership. In this future, the excess profits generated from these self-driving cars would enable them to purchase an additional vehicle, expanding themselves from one car to eventually a fleet. All of this, in theory, could occur without human intervention and without human ownership.

    In the end, there won’t be one single model. We’ll likely see a mixture occurring, just as we see this occurring now. Below, the models are broken out into a grid.


    Matrix: Scenarios of Future Car Ownership

    Mobility Model Who’s Likely to Adopt Who Will Own Business Model
    On Demand Urban areas will embrace Uber, Lyft, car manufacturers On-demand service
    Shared Car Urban areas, suburban Enterprise, Avis, private owners offering cars on Getaround, Turo Subscription, pro-rata
    Wholly Owned Car Wealthy, young families, special care Individual owners Ownership/lease
    Autonomous Cars Own Themselves An advanced artificial intelligence that can self-manage a fleet Cars will own themselves Computer-owned “corporation,” an undefined model, or a nonprofit akin to Wikipedia

    tesla-autopilot

    Above: Tesla’s Autonomous Car

    Tesla showed its hand by prohibiting customers from sharing.
    Recently, Tesla made an unusual mandate, that its own customers cannot enable their privately purchased self-driving Teslas to be listed on Uber or Lyft. This is a strange mandate considering the cars were purchased outright. It, of course, forebodes a few future business models that we’ll see from Tesla; it’ll likely offer a service model where the owners, or Tesla themsleves enable their autonomous cars to be made available to others as a service.

    When would human-driven cars become obsolete?
    While Elon Musk suggests that manually driving a car may someday be illegal due to human error and safety reasons, such vehicles won’t go away anytime soon. There would be a significant economic bottom if so many owned assets were quickly depreciated by a government decree. But looking decades forward, when autonomous cars become dominant and common, we will see a social and perhaps government cry for human drivers to be curbed. Perhaps if it’s not illegal, the insurance costs of manually driving would become too high.

    To summarize, autonomous vehicles will not only significantly impact how we will be transported, but also the very business models in which our economy operates and how cities will change.

    bmw-concept-4-1000x600

    Above: BMW’s Autonomous Concept Car

     
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