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  • feedwordpress 09:51:16 on 2018/01/30 Permalink
    Tags: , Burnt Out Leadership, Character, , , , ,   

    7 Important Reasons Leaders Crash and Burn 

    Whether you’re in a formal leadership role or not, if people are relying on you and you are responsible for their success, you’re serving as a leader—and that means experiencing all the highs and lows of leadership.

    Generally, leaders want to do their best and maintain high standards of excellence. They push themselves for the benefit of their team and put their own interests at the bottom of the list.

    Those attitudes are part of what makes people leaders, but it also puts them at higher than average risk of burnout. Here are seven serious ways leaders set themselves up to crash and burn:

    1. Focusing on being liked. A need to be liked makes leadership a struggle. The best leaders understand that being liked is a side effect, not a goal. If they’re invested in their people and in helping them learn and grow in an atmosphere of respect and equality—as any leader should be—they will be liked. Leaders who focus on being liked, on the other hand, are constantly changing direction in hopes of earning someone’s approval. In the end, they’re not effective as leaders—and they’re actually liked less than those who have their priorities in order. Leadership is not about being liked; it’s about getting the job done while empowering those around you.

    2. Taking on too much without delegating. If you think you’re the only one who can get the job done right, you are doing a disservice to your own leadership—and to all the people who were hired to support you in your work. When you take on too much without delegating you’ll end up feeling perpetually behind with no chance of catching up, and few situations are more exhausting. Part of your role as a leader is helping your team take on more authority to build their own leadership skills. If you don’t delegate, you’re failing your team and yourself.

    3. Deviating from what’s important. If you’re the type of leader who says yes to everything, you’ll end up overloaded and unfocused. Learn instead to say yes only to the things that are important to your mission. Leadership is about getting things done and achieving results, so keep your focus on the things that directly or indirectly contribute to results and learn to say no to the rest.

    4. Relying on consensus. Leaders have to be able to make decisions independently and trust their own judgment. If you find yourself often waiting for people to agree with you or second-guessing yourself, you’re adding to your stress and detracting from your leadership. Building a great team involves collaboration—one of the key elements associated with creating a dynamic corporate culture. But consensus decision making isn’t appropriate or feasible in many situations, and that’s where leadership steps up.

    5. Getting caught up in your own importance. Even good leaders can get caught up in their own hype—which actually means they’re caught up in their own ego. When you lead from your ego you undermine your effectiveness as a leader. Stoking your own ego will never earn you anyone’s respect, and leadership should never be about pushing your own agenda, status and gratification ahead of others affected by your actions.

    6. Failing to build trust. Earning and building trust are at the heart of leadership. If you fail to cultivate trust as a leader, communication and team effectiveness immediately suffer—and it’s hard to make up losses in those areas. Learn the problems that a lack of trust can cause in your team, and remember that resolving trust issues starts and ends with you.

    7. Tending to fix instead of navigate. If you find yourself constantly trying to fix whatever problem is in front of you instead of navigating long-term solutions, you’re going to keep spinning your wheels. Great leaders avoid burnout by empowering others to look for solutions while the leader navigates the way with them.

    In short, if you want to avoid crashing and burning, you need to reach beyond managing your role. You have to learn to manage yourself.

    Lead from within: Working hard for something you don’t care about is called stress; working hard for something you love is called passion.


    N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post 7 Important Reasons Leaders Crash and Burn appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 10:53:28 on 2017/10/24 Permalink
    Tags: , Character, , , Looking for Leadership, , ,   

    Stop Looking For Leadership! 

    Have you found yourself asking where are the leaders?

    Have you thought to yourself where has leadership gone?

    I can imagine you might want to know where you can look for leadership so you can find a great individual that you can follow and maybe even emulate.

    But I am going to tell you to stop looking for leaders.

    Because the individuals that are leaders, you don’t have to look for them, they are there and they will rise up, they will do so in the following ways:

    When everyone does what is good for them, it will be the leader who does the right thing. There is really only one sure fire method for identifying leaders – Do they have the character and integrity to do the right thing, for the right reason, at the right time. The answer to this test will be born out through their actions.

    When everyone else is worried about their reputation, it will be the leader who leads
    with character.
    Norman Schwarzkopf once said, “Leadership is a potent combination of
    strategy and character. But if you must be without one, be without the strategy.” I couldn’t agree more. It will not be the titles or position – they do not a leader make! Rather, leaders must possess the necessary character to inspire others to follow. because a leader who lacks character will not endure the test of time.

    When everyone else has self-doubt, it will be the leader who shows up with confidence: Most individuals suffer from having self-doubt, in their abilities and skills and therefore shy away from what they are capable of accomplishing, it’s the individual that projects confidence- they are the ones that standout because they can captures people’s attention with who they are.

    When everyone else is rigid, it will be the leader that is going to be flexible: if as an individual you lead in way that says, my way or the highway, that kind of leadership style has no place in the world of business or leadership today, but if you are flexible in your approach and you understand the necessity of being fluid, you have identified a leader.

    When everyone else is serving themselves, it will be the leader who is serving others. If an individual doesn’t understand the concept of “service above self” they will not engender themselves as being a leader. Any individual that has a servant heart, that things of what is good for others, that prides themselves as being a supporter and serving others, is a leader.

    When everyone else is preoccupied with taking the credit, it will be the leader that is leading by example: Leaders need no identification as they instinctively and inevitably make their presence known without much fanfare or taking

    When everyone else is distracted, it will be the leader who will be focused: Leaders who are not intentional and are not focused, will fail themselves and their team. Leaders who lack discipline will model the wrong behaviors and will inevitably spread themselves too thin. but when a leader can focus, and follow one course of action until they succeed, that is a leader.

    When everyone is blaming others,  it is the leader who takes responsibility: Real leaders are accountable. They don’t blame others, don’t claim credit for the success of their team, but always accept responsibility for failures that occur on their watch.

    If you find that your company, your organization, your team are looking for leadership and you want to fill it the gap, by appointing an individual to the position and you are hoping they perform- stop.

    The leaders you want are there, you just have to notice them, they are rising to top, they are leading by example, taking responsibility, staying focused, and are busy serving others.

    Lead from Within: Stop looking for leaders out there when you can easily find leadership from within.

     


    Still looking for leadership, you will find it in my National Bestseller book:
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post Stop Looking For Leadership! appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 11:54:49 on 2017/08/29 Permalink
    Tags: , Character, , , ,   

    How to Best Navigate When It Comes to Leadership 

    We’ve suffered far too much bad leadership in recent years. Many who call themselves leaders and hold leadership positions have conducted themselves like people who can’t find their own way, let alone lead others.

    That’s why we are looking for a kind of leader—one we can respect, one we trust and want to follow.

    The kind of leadership we’re looking for, like all great leadership, is grounded in character. But how do leaders use that character to navigate through situations and circumstances?

    They follow their North Star.

    Just as it did for long-ago navigators, the North Star guides them through rough terrain and dark nights. The leader who knows their North Star knows where they are going, how they will get there and what they need along the way.

    To find your North Star, start here:

     Identify your moral inner compass. Your values are the chief guide of your leadership—the moral compass that will help you keep steering toward the things that matter. Without it, it’s easy to drift off course, but when you are centered in your moral inner compass you can translate pressure into success and success into meaning.

    Understand that you may wander off the path. Sometimes leaders get pulled off course into thinking that power is more important than people or that profit is more important than mission. This kind of thinking is a sure indicator that they’re losing their way—probably as a result of fear or insecurity. If you begin to feel lost, don’t despair but lock back onto your North Star and find your way back.

     Know your whole self. As a leader and a person, you need to know not only your sweet spots and strengths but also your blind spots and weaknesses. Own all of who you are. Once you’ve accepted your flaws, no one can use them against you.

    Stay grounded by acting on character. Character is the heart of every valid leadership navigation system. To lack character is to lack the capacity to lead, and capacity without character is dangerous. Your character is defined by your own moral and mental attitude. What makes you feel connected to your true self? When you know who you are, people can trust you.

    Act like a good follower to be a great leader. Many people think that being a leader means constantly fixing, supporting and coaching, but the true essence of a great leader lies in stepping back and listening, understanding, learning. You cannot be a leader and ask other people to follow you unless you know how to follow too. As a follower and a leader, be strong and kind, bold and proud.

    Lead from within: It’s in learning how to navigate that you will find your own North Star to help you, guide you, support you and teach you what it means to be a great leader.

     


    Learn more about your leadership in my National Bestseller book:
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     



    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post How to Best Navigate When It Comes to Leadership appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 10:35:12 on 2017/07/18 Permalink
    Tags: , Character, Conscience, , , ,   

    The One Quality That Will Make You Into A Great Leader 

    Many people have different ideas about what makes great business, great leadership, great influence.

    Some base it on results, profit or success, but after working with top performers and leaders around the world I’ve found that there is one aspect, one trait that makes all the difference in the world.

    It’s leading with a conscience.

    When you lead with a conscience, you put your values first; doing what’s right goes at the top of the list.

    Too often people make the error of mistaking data for wisdom, wealth for competence, logic for intelligence—and in the process values become inconsequential.

    But operating without a conscience limits your influence over others, and even over yourself. When you operate without a clearly defined sense of ethics and morality, you will lose respect.

    So what can you do to lead with your conscience?

    Operate from the inside out. Strong leadership begins with learning your priorities and values—being able to articulate them and walk through their implications. No one can excel or succeed without knowing who they are and what they stand for.

    Coordinate your brain, your mouth and your hands. When you’re working to make an impact on the world, people will be constantly evaluating the things you think, say and do. They will be watching you—and trust me, they will notice any inconsistencies between your beliefs, your words and your actions.

    Be consistent. It’s easy to stray from your moral compass when you’re distracted, discouraged, disenchanted. But remember that those are the times you need your inner guidance the most—and the times that your example will be the strongest, for good or for ill.

    Look for opportunities to exercise your values. Sometimes life and work provide ready-made opportunities to demonstrate your values. The rest of the time, seek them out—and encourage others on your team to do the same. Find appropriate ways to make resources available to causes and organizations that are dear to your team.

    Keep everything in alignment. In reality, there’s no bright line between your personal values and your day-to-day work life. Make sure your policies, your expectations of yourself and others, and your support all reflect your individual conscience as much as they do current HR practices.

     Close the gaps. There’s nothing worse than being in a place of power and being loud and wrong, brash and harsh, untrusted and destructive. If there’s any trace of such tendencies within yourself, work to close those gaps before they harm you further.

    Our everyday behavior at work and at home is where our conscience lies, where our lives begin to matter.

    Lead from within: At the end of the day, we don’t want to try to become people who are successful. We want to become people who have a conscience.

    Learn more about running great teams in my National Bestseller book:
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     

    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post The One Quality That Will Make You Into A Great Leader appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 11:10:04 on 2017/06/27 Permalink
    Tags: , Character, , , , , , ,   

    The Story of Everybody, Somebody, Anybody And Nobody 


    Recently I told a group of leadership executives a simple but meaningful story that you may have heard before. It’s the story of four people named Everybody, Somebody, Anybody and Nobody.

    Here’s the story, titled “Whose Job Is It, Anyway?”

    There was an important job to be done. Everybody was sure that Somebody would do it. Anybody could have done it, but Nobody did it. Somebody got angry about that, because it was Everybody’s job. Everybody thought Anybody could do it, but Nobody realized that Everybody wouldn’t do it. It ended up that Everybody blamed Somebody when Nobody did what Anybody could have done.

    The story may be confusing but the message is clear: no one took responsibility so nothing got accomplished.

    It’s a story that plays out often in organizations and companies and on teams—anywhere there is culture that lacks accountability.

    But how do you get people to take responsibly for their work? Different things work in different situations, but here are some strategies that have proven to be effective:

    Become a role model. You can’t tell people what to do if you yourself aren’t willing to hold yourself to the same level. If you want people to act responsibly, you have to be accountable. Your team and your company look to you for direction.

    Don’t make assumptions. Don’t assume that others know instinctively what to do and when to do it, or even what you expect from them. Before people can take responsibility for their work they require clear communication. The more you communicate, the better the results are likely to be.

    Set the standard. If you expect excellence, it’s up to you to set the standards for results and performance. Make each task or goal measurable and set it on a reasonable timeline so it’s achievable. Give people a clear target and they’ll work to reach it—and maybe even surpass it.

    Get the buy-in to go the distance. You need people to buy in and commit if you want to succeed. Each vision should be compelling; each goal should build toward the whole; each task should be laced with motivation. You need people to feel compelled, inspired and motivated to take responsibility.

    Make regular check-ups. One of the biggest reasons people fall short is a lack of follow-through by leadership. Help people stay focused by setting up regular checkpoints—phone calls or meetings where everyone can communicate and catch up, staying focused on moving forward and being accountable. When people know there will be check-ups, they’re less likely to procrastinate and more likely to hit their targets.

    Provide support and training. Especially with a start-up or a new initiative, people are taking on projects or tasks that they’ve never faced before. Make sure everybody has the training and resources they need to be successful, and provide help in resolving any issues that may arise.

    Encourage candor. One of the worst things that can happen to a team is for people to feel uncomfortable discussing problems and expressing their honest opinions. Build a culture of candor so that people know it’s the norm to tell the truth, even when it’s difficult or awkward.

    Concentrate on solutions and not only problems. If people are having problems or falling behind, expect them to come to you with possible solutions, not just the problems. Create an expectation that the first response to a problem is to start finding solutions.

    Praise performance. Praise people for good results and be specific with your acknowledgment. Let them know what they did well and how their work is affecting others. If they fall short, coach them privately and let them know how they can improve. And if their performance does not improve, also address this with meaningful consequences that have been explained ahead of time.

    To avoid having your team become Everybody, Somebody, Anybody and Nobody, commit to becoming the kind of leader who takes responsibility for your own life and leadership.

    Lead from within: Don’t let Anybody (or Everybody, Somebody or Nobody) stop you from doing what you need to do to create the kind of leadership and life you can be proud of.
    Learn more about running great teams in my National Bestseller book:
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post The Story of Everybody, Somebody, Anybody And Nobody appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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