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  • feedwordpress 08:00:50 on 2020/10/15 Permalink
    Tags: , , Change, , , , , , Potential, , , , , ,   

    How To Make Sure You Are Living Up to Your Potential 


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    No matter how well you’re doing and how many skills you’ve acquired, you may not be fully living up to your leadership potential.

    If you suspect that you have untapped potential but you’re not sure how to reach it, start by working to discover what’s standing in your way so you can put yourself back on track to being the leader you know you can be.

    If you don’t know yourself: Self-understanding is critical to leadership. If you want to understand, motivate and inspire others, you have to begin with yourself. Hire a coach or find a mentor who can help you define your strengths, your gaps, and your style of leadership. All of us have gold hidden within, but we have to dig to get it out.

    If you’re self-centered: Top leaders spend much of their time thinking of others and finding ways to support them, coach them, mentor them and develop them. Great leadership consists largely of believing in others and helping them become great. If you aren’t already doing that, you need to take the focus off yourself. Start cultivating your empathy and devoting more of your time and energy to those around you.

    if your mindset is negative: Left unchallenged, negativity becomes weakness of character. Especially for those in leadership, it’s important to keep your outlook positive. Remember that thoughts become actions, actions become behavior and behavior becomes habit—and your habits play a huge role in achieving your potential. A positive mindset is the mark of a superior personality.

    If you play it safe: As I’ve seen many times over with my clients, few things will stall out your leadership potential more completely than constantly playing it safe. Getting yourself unstuck means having the nerve to take risks and make hard decisions when they’re needed. And ironically, playing it safe is one of the riskiest things you can do. To reach your top potential you will have to face your fear and do what you need to do in spite of it.

    If you don’t know and live by your values: People don’t become great leaders because they’re ambitious or committed to success; they become great leaders because they hold clearly defined values and align everything they do to those values. When you understand your own values and priorities and you commit to them, you gain the authority of authenticity and everything else falls into place. Hard decisions become easier and the people around you become your priority. Knowing and living your values is the key to great leadership.

    The best leaders begin by understanding themselves and finding the gaps they need to fill. They work on their own mindset and attitudes, and over time they come to realize that leadership is about serving others while you better yourself.

    Lead from within: The willingness to learn, the desire to risk, the urge to reach your full potential—these are the keys that will unlock the door to your leadership excellence.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How To Make Sure You Are Living Up to Your Potential appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:56 on 2020/09/29 Permalink
    Tags: , Change, , , , , , , , , ,   

    What Leadership Skills Will Be Needed In the Future 


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    It may be hard to think about the future when the present is so challenging, but in times of great change and uncertainty it’s more important than ever to stay a step—or several steps—ahead in your preparation. These are the skills you should be cultivating now to be successfully as a leader for the future.

    A positive attitude toward change. Leaders of the future will need to be optimistic by nature and positive about change, because everything around us is likely to remain uncertain and complex for some time to come. Leaders won’t have the luxury of allowing themselves to become overwhelmed or immobilized; they must maintain an optimistic mindset as things around them remain unsure.

    A communication style that brings clarity around complexity. Leaders of the future will need to cultivate the ability to see through complexity and complications, to make sense of messy situations filled with contradictions, to cut through superficial concerns and communicate the essence of the issue at hand. Their clarity will help them lead people to better things that most people can’t yet perceive.

    Transparency that leads to trust. Leaders of the future will need to be fully authentic and transparent. Even when the news is bad, people want to know what’s really happening. In an era when trust will be crucial, leaders who are consistently open and genuine, regardless of the circumstances, will engender that trust.

    Flexibility that embraces ambiguity. Leaders of the future will need to be agile and flexible—able to create quickly, risk passionately, pivot immediately and move on from failures, taking in the lessons of each experience in order to keep moving forward. The future will bring ambiguity, and the best teachers will be creation, risk, failure and experience.

    A true appreciation of diversity. Leaders of the future will need to genuinely appreciate diversity and embrace its value at every level. In a time of uncertainty, constructive engagement happens best when leaders bring together people with different backgrounds, expertise and knowledge.

    A gift for seeing the good within the bad. Leaders of the future will need to develop the skill of learning how to turn crises and challenges into opportunities. Preparation and nimble thinking will keep teams and organizations out in front of events, so they’re ready to offer solutions in the moment.

    The confidence to undertake massive disruption. Leaders of the future need  to access their inner determination to achieve and their willingness to make massive changes in their teams, their organizations, their industries—even themselves.

    We can’t know what lies ahead. But whatever form the future takes, successful leaders will be those who know how to act with courage and clear intent in an authentic and engaging way that will create trust among their people—those with the imagination, integrity, and agile intelligence to make truly great things happen.

    Lead from within: The future holds both challenges and opportunities. Are you listening to the signals today and developing the skills you’ll need to lead in the times ahead?

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post What Leadership Skills Will Be Needed In the Future appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:15 on 2020/09/17 Permalink
    Tags: , Change, Cheerleader, , , , , , , , ,   

    Why People Who Want Their Leader to Be a Cheerleader Are Getting It Wrong 


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    Everyone needs someone to motivate and inspire them, whether it’s a parent or a minister or an athlete. People often look to their leaders for that kind of inspiration. And on the surface it makes sense: who wouldn’t want a leader who’s positive and encouraging compared to one who talks tough or is focused on outcomes rather than people? But wanting your leader to be your cheerleader is actually a big mistake.

    Don’t get me wrong—I believe that leaders should be inspiring and positive. But we need much more from those who lead us:

    We need leaders who will challenge us today so we can be better tomorrow. To be challenged can be uncomfortable, and it doesn’t always come with a feel-good message. Motivating people to achieve great things means stimulating and influencing and provoking them to do more and be more. It may not feel good in the moment, but often “You can do better—try again” is exactly what we need to hear.

    We need leaders who are straight shooters, not sugar-coaters. Not everything a leader has to say is positive. Growth requires someone who will be honest and direct and tell it like it is, and experiencing criticism expressed openly and honestly can make teams stronger and more productive. We miss out on lots of opportunities for learning and development when we’re surrounded by soft-pedaling critics.

    We need leaders who care less about being liked and more about being respected. Part of being a leader is making tough decisions. And if the leader is a good one, people will respect those decisions even if they dislike them. Leaders have to look at the big picture, and sometimes that means having the courage to do things that are unpopular—but those who are willing to make tough decisions for the good of all are ultimately the most admired.

    We need leaders who are experts, not enthusiasts. At the end of the day, do you want a leader who spends all day speaking lots of positive messages but doesn’t make a meaningful contribution to your team’s work? Far better to have an expert who is optimistic and skillful. There are plenty of leaders who try to make people feel good without giving them much to think about. But effective leadership makes you think—and then feel good about it.

    We all want bosses, managers and leaders who make us feel good, but it’s far more important—for ourselves and for our teams—that we find the people who can help us develop, grow and evolve. What we all need most is a leader we can trust and respect, one who will challenge us to discover our own motivation and become our own cheerleaders.

    Lead from within: The best leaders might not be the biggest cheerleaders but those who challenge us the most—and because they do, we respect them for it.


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Why People Who Want Their Leader to Be a Cheerleader Are Getting It Wrong appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:20 on 2020/09/10 Permalink
    Tags: , Change, , Diversity, , Inclusion, Inclusive, , , , , , , ,   

    How to Do Inclusive Leadership—the Right Way 


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    In recent months we’ve heard courageous voices demanding social and economic equality, and leaders within many organizations have been responding to that call by examining their own attitudes and practices.

    Most of them have good intentions, but there’s a big divide between intentions and outcomes. In practice, inclusion often goes amiss, strategies for change go flat, and the potential for excellence is lost.

    I’ve made a point in recent months of having each of my clients—from small-business owners to executives of major corporations—take a fresh look at their organization’s diversity and inclusion initiatives. Most of them came away from the process with a desire to genuinely do better instead of spinning their wheels with measures that didn’t create lasting change. Here’s an outline of the coaching I’ve been providing these clients on how to start doing things differently:

    Increase your self-awareness. Inclusiveness starts with the leader at the helm. Begin by honestly asking yourself how well you genuinely embrace and engage in inclusion. Many leaders understand the importance of inclusion and diversity in theory and are happy to advocate for it with their words, but they’re far less comfortable taking the kind of action that creates change. Commit to taking that action and make it a priority. When you do, your commitment will reverberate throughout your organization.

    Expose your blind spots. Implicit bias is built in to the human brain. That means that even the best of us—individuals and organizations—have blind spots that keep us from seeing things objectively. It takes an outsider to identify and start eliminating those blind spots, so find a consultant or coach you trust and give them a broad mandate to help you achieve change.

    Deepen your relationships. After you’ve developed a higher level of self-awareness, you’re ready to begin working on social awareness—the way your beliefs and implicit biases affect your relationships with others. If you want your company to become more inclusive, start working on your own ability to create authentic relationships with your colleagues and employees. Changing an organization’s culture begins with simple acts of connection.

    Invest in change. It’s one thing to say you want change, but to make it happen you need to add money, time and effort to your words. Invest in resources and people. Spend time and energy working to confront challenges and create opportunities. Identify and study your gaps and find ways to bridge them. Do what it takes to make sure every employee feels valued and knows they matter and belong.

    Embody courage. Being an inclusive leader isn’t easy. Some will criticize you for your commitment, and others will criticize you for not getting the results you want right away. But I believe that every leader should pursue this path with as much determination as possible. Change requires courage, and the best way of making it happen sooner rather than later is by forging ahead.

    Lead from within:  All change has to start somewhere and genuine, meaningful inclusiveness has to begin within you as a leader.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Do Inclusive Leadership—the Right Way appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:31 on 2020/06/16 Permalink
    Tags: , Change, , , , , , , , ,   

    How to Manage Those Who Are Struggling to Perform Remotely 


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    Working remotely is not easy, especially for people who are relatively new to it. Distractions and diversions, intrusions and interruptions can make it hard for people to excel. You may find that even an employee who is strong performer at the office is having a difficult time working from home. There are specific things you can do to manage those who are struggling to perform remotely:

    Create a trusted dialogue. The culture in some organizations is structured in a way that forbids or discourages complaints and open speech. But to be effective as a leader you have to create relationships with people; they need to know that they can tell you the truth and speak with candor without negative repercussions. The goal is to create communication that is a dialogue built on trust, not a one-sided monologue.

    Address the situation head on. My coaching clients sometimes tell me “You said to be empathetic if someone is struggling, so I’m giving them a pass.” My reply: Yes, you need to lead with empathy. But if there’s a problem, failing to address it solves nothing—and creates an additional problem.

    Get to the source. You may be making assumptions about why an individual is struggling. But if you don’t ask, you don’t know, and if you don’t know you can’t get to the source of the issue. It could be that processes are too cumbersome, technology is breaking down, or they aren’t getting the information they need. You can’t begin solving the underlying problem until you identify it.

    Take accountability first. Before you can expect your employees to take responsibility for their own actions, you—as a leader—must take the first step and set the standard. Accountability starts with you. If there is a systemic or management issue creating a problem, be the first to acknowledge your responsibility. Once you take accountability and make that a clear expectation, it will be easier to move on to finding creative solutions.

    Demonstrate empathy. As a leader it is important to check in and have courageous conversations in which people can speak honestly and candidly. In those cases, your job as a leader is not to try to fix things outside your control but to empathize with those who are struggling and acknowledge the difficulties they’re facing. Listen carefully. Resist the temptation to tell them what to do; don’t be overly prescriptive or micromanage. Simply ask them what they need to make things better. It’s part of your job as the leader to make sure those who are struggling have the resources and assistance they need to be successful.

    As a leader it is your responsibility to help those you lead—and by helping them you are making it possible for them to contribute their best.

    Lead from within: When people are struggling for any reason, it’s up to the leader to help them figure out what it will take for them to succeed.


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Manage Those Who Are Struggling to Perform Remotely appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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