Tagged: Change Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • feedwordpress 09:00:21 on 2019/02/19 Permalink
    Tags: Change, , , , , , ,   

    This is How the Best Leaders Coach Through Change 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    The world is changing fast, and business has to constantly evolve to keep up. Organizations are always looking for new ways of doing business, new products, new innovations—it’s an important part of almost any successful business strategy.

    Even with all its advantages, change requires some care to implement. One important factor, often neglected, is the need for leaders to coach their teams through times of change. Great leaders understand that people need support and guidance so they can adapt.

    As an executive leadership coach, I’ve seen leaders who were reluctant to share information and guide people along the way—and the results were never good. The nature of change is disruption, and when people feel that change is something that’s happening to them rather than something they’re helping to create, they become defensive and fearful. It’s important to bring people on board and let them know they’ll continue to have a valuable role.

    Here are the techniques used by the leaders I’ve seen do the best job of coaching their people through change:

    Communicate frequently. When change is happening, one of the most important things you can do is communicate frequently and repeatedly. Don’t assume people know what is going on—tell them and keep them in the loop. Avoid sidebar conversations and gossip, and don’t accept them in the workplace. When people start to talk among themselves without solid information, the rumor mill takes over and you lose control of the message.

    Tell a compelling story. As a leader, you need to tell a compelling story that explains the why for change, which in turn will lead naturally to the how. Remember that one of your top goals is to give people a context of meaning and purpose for the change.

    Address fears. It’s important that you hear, understand and address the fears that people are experiencing and that you address the change from their perspective. Above all, they want to know what will happen to them and how their role will change. Try not to get frustrated with those who are resistant and fearful. Challenge preconceptions and assumptions and be supportive.

    Lead with respect. Take the time to coach others with respect and help them through what they likely perceive as a challenging and intimidating situation. Pay close attention to people’s reactions at every stage. Respect their emotions as you communicate the change.

    Understand to learn. The best leaders take time to understand why people feel the way they do. Don’t rush it—some people may not want to talk about their feelings at work. Others may be confused about their emotions. As their leader, be the coach you need to be to take to understand and to learn from them what they are going through.

    Give a sense of purpose. The best leaders understand that for people to take risks, they need to connect to a clear vision. People need to understand how the future will look and how it will affect them. Once that is in place, focus on the individual’s strengths and goals and where they can fit with the organization’s shifting needs and priorities.

    A great leader has the responsibility of also being a great coach. Coaching is a powerful tool for helping people understand and embrace change. It takes time and patience, but the investment pays off in the long term.

    Lead from Within: Effective coaching through change will help people and keep them working together in a setting where everyone knows their role, responsibility and value they can bring to the company.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photos

    The post This is How the Best Leaders Coach Through Change appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:34 on 2019/01/07 Permalink
    Tags: , Change, , , , , , , , , ,   

    When Is It Important to Change How You Lead 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    I have a habit of reading a book a day, and my favorite subjects are history and biography. I like to study what has happened to leaders in the past and how they dealt with their own challenging times.

    We have our own challenges in the here and now: business changes quickly and technology is constantly evolving. But the principles of leadership are timeless. So do we change our leadership to adapt, or stay the course we’re already on?

    As with so many things, the answer is “It depends.” The changes themselves aren’t the issue—it’s the things that get lost in the shuffle. Especially when change is whirling around you, take some time to examine the basics and see what’s missing—then adapt your leadership to provide it. Here are some examples:

    When character is lost, lead with character. Character sets the tone for how people will be, and when it goes missing it leaves a definite void. Lead by example; show what character looks like and sounds like. The importance of character can’t be overstated. Authentic leaders are grounded in a strong set of personal values that can have a profound effect on everyone.

    When self-awareness is lacking, lead with self-awareness. Research suggests that leaders who are self-aware—who know themselves—are up to four times more effective in managing change than people who aren’t. The need for self-awareness and understanding is a constant. “Leader, know thyself” is the biggest asset to leadership.

    When honesty is gone, lead with integrity. There’s nothing more destructive than dishonesty, and broken trust can rarely be regained. In a broken environment it’s more important than ever to lead with integrity and to maintain standards of honor and truthfulness. However difficult it may seem, it always pays off in the end.

    When empathy isn’t present, lead with compassion. One of the most valuable traits a leader can possess is the ability to tune in to people and truly understand them. Understanding the emotions of others equips you to respond to them and to develop strong relationships. When empathy is missing from a workplace, a leader needs to set the tone by demonstrating the power of compassion and understanding.

    When decisiveness is absent, lead with determination. One of the biggest challenges of our time is trying to choose from a dizzying multitude of options. Decisiveness has never been more important. In its absence, a leader needs to be even quicker on their feet and prepared to gather data quickly and make huge decisions on the fly in an educated manner.

    When optimism is gone, lead with positivity. Even the sunniest people find it hard to keep up positive energy in a sour environment. When morale sinks, an excellent leader can always start to change things up. They know the power of encouraging words and team spirit, and they make sure people feel good enough about what they are doing in order to keep forging forward.

    When vision is missing, lead with a viewpoint. It’s incredibly hard to rally a group of people together without vision, so it’s imperative for a leader to connect people with a vision so compelling that it draws them to become part of it.

    When innovation is absent, lead with creativity. If those around you are not tapping into the team’s innovation or creativity, it’s the leader’s duty to demonstrate inventiveness and inspiration, leading others to think and act with creatively and passion.

    To truly be a timeless leader you need to pay attention to what is missing and become the person who provides it. The times will keep changing and so will you, but if you grow in leadership while staying agile and alert, you will be able to deliver great leadership under any circumstances.

    Lead from within: Different types of leadership are needed at different times. Figure out what is right for the circumstance and become the agent of needed change.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post When Is It Important to Change How You Lead appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:34 on 2019/01/07 Permalink
    Tags: , Change, , , , , , , , , ,   

    When Is It Important to Change How You Lead 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    I have a habit of reading a book a day, and my favorite subjects are history and biography. I like to study what has happened to leaders in the past and how they dealt with their own challenging times.

    We have our own challenges in the here and now: business changes quickly and technology is constantly evolving. But the principles of leadership are timeless. So do we change our leadership to adapt, or stay the course we’re already on?

    As with so many things, the answer is “It depends.” The changes themselves aren’t the issue—it’s the things that get lost in the shuffle. Especially when change is whirling around you, take some time to examine the basics and see what’s missing—then adapt your leadership to provide it. Here are some examples:

    When character is lost, lead with character. Character sets the tone for how people will be, and when it goes missing it leaves a definite void. Lead by example; show what character looks like and sounds like. The importance of character can’t be overstated. Authentic leaders are grounded in a strong set of personal values that can have a profound effect on everyone.

    When self-awareness is lacking, lead with self-awareness. Research suggests that leaders who are self-aware—who know themselves—are up to four times more effective in managing change than people who aren’t. The need for self-awareness and understanding is a constant. “Leader, know thyself” is the biggest asset to leadership.

    When honesty is gone, lead with integrity. There’s nothing more destructive than dishonesty, and broken trust can rarely be regained. In a broken environment it’s more important than ever to lead with integrity and to maintain standards of honor and truthfulness. However difficult it may seem, it always pays off in the end.

    When empathy isn’t present, lead with compassion. One of the most valuable traits a leader can possess is the ability to tune in to people and truly understand them. Understanding the emotions of others equips you to respond to them and to develop strong relationships. When empathy is missing from a workplace, a leader needs to set the tone by demonstrating the power of compassion and understanding.

    When decisiveness is absent, lead with determination. One of the biggest challenges of our time is trying to choose from a dizzying multitude of options. Decisiveness has never been more important. In its absence, a leader needs to be even quicker on their feet and prepared to gather data quickly and make huge decisions on the fly in an educated manner.

    When optimism is gone, lead with positivity. Even the sunniest people find it hard to keep up positive energy in a sour environment. When morale sinks, an excellent leader can always start to change things up. They know the power of encouraging words and team spirit, and they make sure people feel good enough about what they are doing in order to keep forging forward.

    When vision is missing, lead with a viewpoint. It’s incredibly hard to rally a group of people together without vision, so it’s imperative for a leader to connect people with a vision so compelling that it draws them to become part of it.

    When innovation is absent, lead with creativity. If those around you are not tapping into the team’s innovation or creativity, it’s the leader’s duty to demonstrate inventiveness and inspiration, leading others to think and act with creatively and passion.

    To truly be a timeless leader you need to pay attention to what is missing and become the person who provides it. The times will keep changing and so will you, but if you grow in leadership while staying agile and alert, you will be able to deliver great leadership under any circumstances.

    Lead from within: Different types of leadership are needed at different times. Figure out what is right for the circumstance and become the agent of needed change.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post When Is It Important to Change How You Lead appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:47 on 2018/12/17 Permalink
    Tags: , , Change, , , , , Retirement,   

    The Difficult Day Every Leader Has to Face 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    At some point every leader has to face what is for many a difficult day—the day they are no longer the leader. Maybe they’re retiring or just slowing down or moving on to something new.

    The reason for the departure isn’t as important as the work that precedes it. Every leader should have a succession plan in place. (Even if you’re young and plan to stay where you are, you should still prepare for the remote possibility of a sudden illness or accident.) If you haven’t yet made a plan, here are some guidelines that can help:

    Take your time. A great plan can’t be put together overnight, but the time to start is today. Start by sketching out your areas of responsibility, the reporting and governance structure of your organization, and any parties—team members, colleagues, board members—you want to have input into your planning.

    Groom those with potential. Identify the people in your organization you believe have the potential to be great leaders and begin to teach, coach and prep them. When you invest in your organization’s future leadership, your influence remains long after you’ve left.

    Recognize your emotions (and understand they’re normal). As in many other areas, the best leaders are those who know how to manage their emotions. They don’t allow themselves to be blindsided; they give themselves healthy outlets for voicing and expressing what they’re feeling so when the day does come, the emotions aren’t overwhelming.

    Map your second purpose. I believe our lives comes in stages. For many of us, the first purpose consists doing what’s expected of us, and our work life is driven by the arc of our career. When that stage is over we can move on to our second purpose, where things slow down and we spend our time on things that align with our values.  It’s time to be intentional about where you spend your time and energy.

    Let go and move on. Once you’ve decided to move on, the worst thing you can do is to not let go. Trying to keep hold of the reins leaves you—and everyone around you—in limbo. Especially if you’ve spent years or decades in control, it may be among the most difficult challenges of your life—that’s why you have to prepare far in advance.

    Learn your lessons. Sometimes looking back can help you move forward. Reflect on all the struggles, the lessons you’ve learned, the strengths you’ve developed, all the connection and growth and regrets of your career as leader, and you’ll attain a greater awareness of yourself and where you’re headed.

    When the day comes that it’s time to change seasons, it will be a much easier and more fulfilling transition if it’s handled with care for all concerned—yourself, your organization, and the new leadership.

    Lead from within: Every succession plan will be different, but the only way to know what’s next is to be prepared long before the day arrives and it becomes difficult.

     


    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStock Photo

    The post The Difficult Day Every Leader Has to Face appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:42:56 on 2017/01/17 Permalink
    Tags: , , Amanda Wilks, , , Change, changes in the workplace, difficult circumstances, , , , , workplace changes, workplace effectiveness   

    Five Ways to Deal with Workplace Changes Positively 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    workplaces changes

     

    Article contribution by Amanda Wilks

    Change in the workplace is often very difficult to embrace. It may not be readily apparent to employees why the alterations and adjustments are being made. When they have to deal with workplace changes, it can become the perfect source of employee complaints and disgruntled comments.

    These can be anything from a switch in employee health insurance to a total company shakedown. Whatever the case, there are methods to make this as positive and as painless as possible to handle.

    1.      Support Management

    It can be extremely challenging to deal with workplace changes and support an issue that you don’t know very much about or don’t believe in. Approach your supervisor and let them know that you are on board, and ask if there is anything you can do to help. Ask questions about the process so that you can get more of a feel for the objectives of the changes.

    Speak only positive thoughts and feelings when around other employees and management, so you don’t get pulled into a very negative rumor and gossip mill. Some domains, in particular, will feature many changes. If you have a job in the food industry, for example, know that change is very often the norm in this ever-evolving field.

    2.      Think Outside the Box

    The reasoning for the change may not be readily apparent, so take a step back and look at the situation from all angles. What benefit is this providing? What are the long-term objectives? Who is behind all of the new policies? How long will this transformation take? Looking at the changes from management’s viewpoint may make all the difference in your attitude and your actions.

    3.      Set an Example

    While other employees may be resisting the implementation of these changes, be the change your superiors want you to be by enthusiastically plunging into the new regimen. This may make you very unpopular with your co-workers, but others may see the logic in what you are doing and follow suit.

    Further down the road, it may make the difference between being asked to stay on as an employee or being fired or laid off.

    4.      Make Suggestions

    Change is difficult for everyone, even those at the top. If you can see an area where a simple tweak can make it even more effective, tactfully point it out to your superiors. It is all probably very new to them as well, and they may welcome any input that causes the new order to be more productive, efficient, and positively received.

    Often, change comes about so quickly that every last detail is not yet completely thought out, so any input or suggestions are usually very well received.

    5.      Ask Questions

    Asking questions about the changes may quell many fears. Sometimes management automatically assumes that the rest of the personnel is well aware of the reasoning behind the moves. Be very tactful and sincere with any inquiries that you make. Relay any helpful information back to other concerned employees, or if you feel comfortable enough with your superiors, ask for an informational meeting where everyone can ask pertinent questions and voice their opinions.

    Often it is a fear of the unknown that paralyzes company personnel. Encouraging all to be forthright and honest about the situation can assist in improving morale and the general atmosphere. Communication is always key, no matter the circumstances.

    The outcome of the new regimen may take months or even years to come to fruition. Stay focused on your career, go the extra mile, and pay close attention to the outcomes of the changes. Realize that sometimes management may make a wrong call or mistakes in their judgments, and if the new rules do not work out, the business may revert to the old procedures and dynamics.

    Change from a business perspective is usually to increase production, service quality, produce a new or altered product, generate more income, or lessen costs. An employee with the foresight to understand that the business does have everyone’s best interests in mind will go far in becoming an exemplary, dependable, and long-term staff member.

    Following the above suggestions will portray you and your fellow staff as team players who are willing to deal with workplace changes and stick with the company through thick and thin. The ultimate success of the adjustments or revisions will depend on the cooperation of all employees.

    Image source: 1

    The post Five Ways to Deal with Workplace Changes Positively appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
esc
cancel