Tagged: Career Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • feedwordpress 20:55:24 on 2018/07/04 Permalink
    Tags: Career, , ,   

    Quick Tip #79: Plot Your Path 


     

    Writing for the Eye and Speaking for the Ear are very different. That’s why learning how to organize in 5 easy steps can turn boring talks and presentations into brilliant ones.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:07 on 2018/07/03 Permalink
    Tags: , , Career, Energy, , , , , , , , ,   

    How Successful Leader Manage Their Energy Not Their Time 

    Many of the leaders I work with are anxious to hear tips on time management. But after working with business leaders and executives for over three decades, I’ve come to realize that the most effective and successful leaders treat time management as a secondary concern. For them, it’s energy management that produces real results.

    Most of my clients—and most leaders in general—have a lot to accomplish. When it feels like there aren’t enough hours in the day to do what you need to do, it’s all too easy to push yourself beyond your limits. As a result, you can become burned out long before you accomplish your goals.

    When I coach my clients on using their time effectively, the first step is to work on managing their energy. It can be challenging in our overscheduled and hurried world, but here are some of the fundamental principles:

    It’s about getting the rest you need. People try to get everything done in an all-nighter, but in fact the longer you stay up the less productive you become. It’s best to get a good night’s sleep and start fresh.

    It’s about quality, not quantity. I don’t know any business leaders who don’t have too much to do. It’s not about how much you can get done but how you get it done. Quality always wins out over quantity. It may even give you the zest to do more—it is a powerful feeling when you get things done with excellence.

    It’s about being present without being distracted. The best way to manage your energy and time is to be fully present with whatever, or whoever, needs your attention. When you have true focus, you can accomplish tasks twice as fast with more energy left over.

    It’s about taking small breaks. Multiple studies have found that you have more energy for the day’s tasks, especially work-related tasks, if you take short breaks throughout the day. Those can be as simple as five to 10 minutes of stepping away from your work space and getting into a different mental zone — for instance, taking a short walk, completing an unrelated task, listening to a favorite song or reading something else. Research suggests that distracting yourself briefly once an hour gives you more energy to work during the day productively.

    It’s about working out. You’ve likely heard it a thousand times already: exercise gives you endorphins, endorphins make you happy and being happy gives you energy. When you feel like you don’t have the energy to exercise and you drag yourself to the gym, you’ll leave feeling more energized. Numerous studies point to regular exercise as having a significant role in increasing energy levels and reducing fatigue.

    Lead from within: If you are truly mindful of your energy and you manage it well, you’re likely to become far more productive—and, as a result, a more effective leader.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post How Successful Leader Manage Their Energy Not Their Time appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:20 on 2018/06/19 Permalink
    Tags: , Career, , , , ,   

    5 Ways to Be A Better Leader 

    Good leaders, like professional athletes, make everything they do look easy. But in reality, many of them have to work hard to manage or compensate for potentially career-limiting traits.

    I’ve worked with many executives as a business leadership coach, and I’ve come to understand that becoming a better leader requires a strategy and suggestions on how to improve. With that principle in mind, here are five ways you can become a better leader immediately.

    Practice self-awareness. Think of yourself as the conductor of an orchestra—focused on helping every person on your team perform at their best. To be effective in this work, you need to understand your own strengths as well as your weaknesses and leadership gaps. Understanding yourself helps you leverage your strengths and your gaps. And at the end of the day, we all need to understand what challenges us and allow that awareness to become better leaders. What we understand, we own—and what we own doesn’t own us.

    Learn how to coach your people. The greatest and strongest leaders know they’re only as good as the teams around them, so they put tremendous emphasis on coaching and supporting their people, helping them grow. It’s important to give each person the attention and feedback that will motivate them to make meaningful contributions.

    Be willing to talk about difficult subjects. It’s always nice when you can act as a cheerleader for your organization, but the more important task is to help your team navigate the uncertain times. Business is messy, leadership isn’t easy and the way ahead may be far from clear. Communicate with your team about the issues facing your organization and industry—things like risks, variables, volatile markets. When you do, you not only build trust but also quash speculation and rumor mills.

    Ask for help when you need it. Most leaders consider themselves highly capable, which makes it even harder when they need to ask for support. But requesting help from others will always be one of the best ways to become a better leader. If you’re feeling stuck, seek out a mentor or hire a coach.

    Serve as a model. When you act as a model of integrity and hard work—when you talk the talk and walk the walk—people will admire your leadership and work to emulate your behavior. If you want to become a better leader, work on modeling the qualities you’d like to see in your team and in others.

    Lead from within: The best leaders know they can be even better leaders and they do everything they can to improve.

    Photo Credit: Shutterstock

     


    N A T I O N A L    B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now
     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post 5 Ways to Be A Better Leader appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 04:57:51 on 2018/06/16 Permalink
    Tags: , , Career, , , , , ,   

    10 Bad Mistakes You Can Make as A New Boss 

    If you have plans of becoming a manager or taking on any leadership position, you can help yourself tremendously by being aware of the mistakes that hurt the reputations and relationships of new bosses. Here are the ten most common that I see in my work as a leadership coach. Check in with yourself periodically throughout your first year and make sure you’re avoiding these potholes, and before you know it you’ll be a well-regarded and seasoned leader.

    Trying to lead with a one-size-fits-all approach.

    Don’t assume that everyone needs the same kind of communication or motivation. The best bosses make an effort to become acquainted with those they lead as individuals and tailor an equitable approach that best connects with each individual on their team. Leadership is about investing your time and energy in getting to know those you lead and giving them what they need most.

    Poor communication.

    Even some experienced leaders have a hard time communicating well with their team. Good news is easy, but difficulties and problems are more challenging to communicate effectively. In my new book, The Leadership Gap, I talk about great leaders as great communicators and truth tellers. They’re honest and transparent with their team, even if the news is bad. Whatever’s going on, share it openly and involve others to come up with a solution. Honest communication builds trust and shuts down harmful rumor mills and gossip.

    Thinking that what got you here will keep you here.

    Many people are promoted to management because they’re rock stars in their field–but that doesn’t necessarily mean they have the managerial or leadership skills they need in their new role. Find a coach or mentor who can help you excel in the transition and teach you what you need to know to succeed and keep advancing.

    Trying to change everything right away.

    Making rapid wholesale changes is among the worst mistakes you can make in any position of authority. To earn respect, start by taking some time to understand the workplace culture and dynamics, then make any changes incrementally and with as much participation and buy-in from the team as possible. Listen and learn, and don’t change things that work well just because you can.

    Abusing power.

    Leadership is not about flexing your personal power but empowering others. That means you stand alongside those you lead and develop relationships that are collegial and mutually respectful. When you do, you’re more likely to discover a team of followers–not just subordinates–who work effectively, efficiently and happily.

    Failing to deliver difficult feedback.

    It’s natural to want to be liked, so too often new bosses avoid giving feedback–especially the difficult kind. But here’s the irony: if your leadership style is based on pleasing people and being liked, over time you’ll be seen as insecure, and you’ll become disliked and disrespected. If problems persist and challenges go unaddressed, your best people will grow frustrated, which in turn will lead to low morale and high employee turnover. Better to face up to what needs to be done.

    Staying isolated in the office.

    To be in a new position can be daunting, and wanting to make sure all goes well can keep you working long hours isolated behind closed doors. But that isolation is a big mistake. New leaders need to be visible, available and accessible. Your presence helps convey the message that you’re there to serve others and they can count on you.

    Not learning to delegate effectively.

    As a leadership coach I can’t count how many times I’ve heard this: “I’m new, I want to do things right, and if it’s going to be done right, then I have to do it myself.” Wrong! if you cannot delegate, you are not leading effectively. The only message you’re sending is that you’re a micromanager who doesn’t trust your people to do their jobs, and that reputation never leads to good results. Don’t make the mistake of trying to do everything all by yourself. Learn to trust those who have been hired to do their work–stand beside them but don’t control them. Give them the freedom they need to excel.

    Not knowing how to motivate others.

    It can be intimidating to be the new boss, but it’s imperative that you start by working to understand the motivation of your people–what drives them, compels them, excites them. From there you can fulfill your responsibility to nourish them into doing things they didn’t even know were possible. As I tell my clients, great leaders inspire those around them to do great things, and they do it by knowing what motivates others to excel.

    Failing to show appreciation.

    In their desire to hit the ground running and start racking up impressive accomplishments, new leaders often fail to recognize the contributions of others. When you focus only on results, you forget to acknowledge the effort, the talent and the performance. And when that happens, you team becomes less imaginative, less productive, and more likely to play it safe and just put in their hours.

    Every new role carries a need for new skills, and being a new boss is no different. Avoid these costly rookie mistakes and you’ll have a great start toward becoming the leader you are meant to be.


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post 10 Bad Mistakes You Can Make as A New Boss appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 04:52:00 on 2018/06/16 Permalink
    Tags: , Career, , , Hate, , , , ,   

    How to Get Along with a Co-worker You Hate 

    Hate is a strong word. But sometimes you will likely have to work with people you have a hard time getting along with, and over time those feelings can grow into something strong enough to warrant the word.

    Maybe they’re untrustworthy, or lazy, or self-aggrandizing, or unaware of how their habits affect others. Maybe they just rub you the wrong way. Whatever the issue,  you may be feeling that the only way to make it better is to leave.

    But if leaving isn’t an option–or if you like your job and don’t want to give it up–there are things you can do to cope.

    Here are seven ways you can make life more bearable with a co-worker you despise:

    If you can’t change the situation, you have to learn to change yourself.

    If you can’t change the other person–and the odds are high that you can’t–what you can do is to change yourself. Work to adopt a different attitude and mindset. Remember that leadership begins from within, and by developing the resources to deal with your frustration, you’re building a valuable skill.

    To get a solution you must first reframe the problem.

    It’s easy to recall all the things you dislike about your coworker, but instead work to reframe them by focusing on their good qualities. As a coach, when I help people navigate conflicts, I always have each person state a few things that they appreciate about the other. If you can come from a positive side and find something, however small, to feel good about, you’ll be much better off.

    Let the things that irritate you lead to a better understanding of yourself.

    When you have a strong reaction to someone else, psychology says that it might be projection or envy. When you realize you’re totally irritated by something, take a moment to consider whether it might relate to something you dislike within yourself. What we hate in others is likely to be a reflection of our own worst qualities.

    Remember that whatever you resist will follow you.

    If you can’t find a way to work through what you’re feeling, chances are that you’ll have to face the same issue down the road. The lessons we encounter in life tend to be repeated until we manage to truly learn and internalize them. It’s human nature to resist these patterns–and the more important the issue, the more resistance we throw at it. But if you work through it now, you can save yourself a lot of trouble.

    Be radically honest no matter how much you want to hide the truth.

    Hating anyone burns up your emotional bandwidth and energy, keeping you from the things you need to do. Be honest and have a courageous conversation by being vulnerable about voicing your opinions. Much of the time, people are completely oblivious to how their behavior makes other people feel. Bringing their lousy behavior to their attention may open the door and change things for the better.

    Treat feedback as a gift that you are given in the present.

    When you confront someone, you also have to be prepared to listen to their side. Seek first to understand-pay attention to what is being said, taking in body language and tone as well as what’s spoken, then respond, don’t react.

    Focus on inclusion because segregation has never brought anyone but trouble. 

    When you really can’t stand someone, don’t think of segregating yourself from that person. Instead, find ways to include them in what you do. Find out more about the person, learn their story, and try to understand what drives them. You may find out you’ve been reading them all wrong.

    These things are not easy to do–trust me, I know. When people come to me as a coach and ask how to handle a person they hate, they want a quick fix, but quick fixes aren’t really fixes at all. If it’s going to get better, we have to work harder.

    In a perfect world, we’d get along perfectly in good relationships with all our co-workers. In reality, most of us spend at least some time working with someone we can’t stand– but there are always options to try and make things a little better.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post How to Get Along with a Co-worker You Hate appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
esc
cancel