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  • feedwordpress 08:00:10 on 2020/08/06 Permalink
    Tags: , Career, , , , , , , ,   

    How to Easily Spot Leadership Qualities in Others 


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    Something I’m often asked is how you can spot someone with leadership potential. In my decades of leadership coaching, where I’ve worked with people from top corporate leaders to those just beginning to aspire to leadership, I’ve found there are certain qualities that get people noticed and attract others to their point of view. They don’t necessarily mean that person will become a great leader, but they indicate the potential is there.

    These leadership traits are all fairly easy to spot, even from a distance. Here are the most important:

    High performance. Potential leaders consistently go above and beyond, whether they’re delivering specific results or working to move an organization forward. And they do it quietly and unobtrusively, in a manner that doesn’t suggest that they’re marketing themselves. It’s clear to all that they’re working primarily for the good of their team and organization.

    High potential. Potential leaders don’t stop at doing what they have to do—they’re constantly seeking out new responsibilities and learning new skills. They’re the ones who are always asking “How can I help?” and helping find the answers to everyone’s questions.

    High influence. You know the people you seek out instinctively to see what they think or how they would handle something? Those are people with influence, people marked for leadership. They may be anywhere within an organization—across, down or up from you—but their personality makes you feel safe in going to them and reassures you that they’ll be there for you.

    High values. People with high values are easy to spot, especially when a difficult situation arises. They unthinkingly do what is right, not what is easy, and they’re willing to do whatever it takes to find a solution with integrity. Their values hold them to a cause greater than themselves, and that connection is visible in everything they do.

    High optimism. Even in great organizations, it’s easy for pessimism and fatalism to flourish in the ranks. So when you find someone who views everything through a positive lens and is constantly striving to bring about the better future they envision, you know that person has great leadership qualities—especially if their positivity and resiliency are contagious.

    If you’re looking for a rising leader in your organization, look for someone who’s working to make a difference with their performance, their potential, their influence, their values and their optimism. And if you want to be a known as a leader, work to cultivate those qualities within yourself.

    Lead from within: If you want to spot a leader easily, don’t look for someone who’s telling you what to do. Instead, look for someone who’s showing you how it can be done, inspiring all the way.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: istockphoto

    The post How to Easily Spot Leadership Qualities in Others appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:44 on 2020/07/23 Permalink
    Tags: , Career, , , , , , , , ,   

    How to Control Your Emotions During a Difficult Conversation 


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    For most of us, just the thought of a difficult conversation causes anxiety and frustration. But there are times they need to happen, and as with most difficult things, it’s good to go in with a plan.

    One of the biggest issues people face in these moments is dealing with a rush of emotions. The part of the brain that perceives a threat triggers a fight-or-flight response that doesn’t leave much room for rational thought. And before you know it, you find yourself in a conversation that’s on the wrong track. Here are some of the ways top leaders maintain their presence of mind even during the most tension-filled discussions:

    Be aware of your body. It’s not just the mind but also the body that responds to a perceived threat. If your heart’s racing, your first job is to calm your body. Standing up and walking around helps to activate the thinking part of your brain.

    Learn to anchor yourself. When you’re struggling internally it’s easy to miss out on some of what’s being said, and in a difficult conversation you don’t want to miss a word. A simple anchoring exercise can help. Place your feet firmly on the ground and notice how the floor feels on the bottom of your shoes. This simple technique can help you stay literally grounded and keep your focus.

    Label the emotion. When it feels like a swirl of emotions is coming at you quickly, distance yourself by labeling what you’re feeling. Labeling allows you to see your thoughts and feelings for what they are and put space between yourself and your emotions.

    Don’t allow transference to occur. If you’re dealing with someone with a volatile personality, it’s important not to let their emotional dysfunction transfer onto you. If they’re angry, be a witness to their anger—don’t take it on.

    Listen to understand. A leader listens to learn something new. The single most important way to foster that kind of listening is to shift your internal response from “I understand” to “Help me understand.” Everything else will follow from that.

    Make time to process. In the heat of a difficult conversation, most of us have said things we later regret. Let the person who is venting have their say. Don’t react with blame or excuses or rejoinders. Instead, slow down the process by responding, “It’s important that I understand what you just said, so I’m going to take time to digest it all and I will get back to you soon.” Giving yourself time to process your emotions will help make your feelings less intense.

    Let’s face it: difficult conversations are the norm, especially between people at work. But how you react to the circumstances and content of the conversation is what makes the difference between a good leader and a great leader.

    Lead from within: Human interactions are complex, but by simply taking responsibility for our own behavior,  we can gain at least some influence over the problem.


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Control Your Emotions During a Difficult Conversation appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:36 on 2020/06/11 Permalink
    Tags: , , Career, , , , , , , ,   

    How The Best Leaders Manage Their Anxiety 


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    I can tell you from my experience as a leadership coach that many leaders suffer from anxiety. If we’re being honest, everyone experiences anxiety to some degree. I make sure my coaching clients have the tools they need to manage their anxiety because left unchecked, it can do great damage to their decision-making ability and overall effectiveness. Here are some of the techniques I share with them for managing anxiety:

    Acknowledge your anxiety without denying it. Anxiety never shows up without a reason. So invite it in and try to understand why it’s manifesting right now. Ignoring your feelings and pushing them away never works. Instead, acknowledge your anxiety so you can begin to address it and manage it.

    Accept your anxiety without attachment. It’s not unusual to internalize anger along with anxiety. But the best way to ease the stress is to accept it without blame. If it makes you uncomfortable, name it. Because the more you try to control your anxiety, the harder it fights back. Avoid the tug of war by learning how to detach yourself and accept your anxiety. When you do, you’ve already made progress in moving through it.

    Surf the wave without getting swallowed up by the current. It may be impossible to get rid of your anxiety. As frustrating as that can feel, part of managing anxiety is understanding that you may not be in top form until things settle down. The goal is to learn to surf the waves of distress without being overwhelmed by their power.

    Watch for patterns and label your feelings. For most of us, anxiety comes with a pattern. It may be that stress leads to fear which leads to anxiety. Or it may be that something doesn’t work out, your perfectionist tendencies lead you to anger, and anxiety follows. Look for your individual patterns so you can label and understand the events and emotions that lead up to anxiety.

    Learn your telltale signs. When you’re feeling anxious, take note of your physical reactions. They often function as an early warning system to alert you to imminent anxiety. It might be a stomach flip, tense shoulders, or an inability to focus. Once you learn to recognize your physical symptoms, you can catch anxiety before it overtakes you.

    Let go of controlling anxiety and work to manage it. Victor Frankl famously said, “Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.” Instead of working to control the situation, choose your response. Make a conscious decision to manage your anxiety by breathing, shifting your attention, and taking small purposeful actions.

    Many leaders emphasize their strength, competence, and credentials in the workplace. Wouldn’t it be great if more of them opened up about how they learned to manage anxiety?

    Lead from within: Anxiety makes leadership interesting, but managing anxiety makes leadership meaningful—for you and for those you lead.

     

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How The Best Leaders Manage Their Anxiety appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:36 on 2020/06/11 Permalink
    Tags: , , Career, , , , , , , ,   

    How The Best Leaders Manage Their Anxiety 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    I can tell you from my experience as a leadership coach that many leaders suffer from anxiety. If we’re being honest, everyone experiences anxiety to some degree. I make sure my coaching clients have the tools they need to manage their anxiety because left unchecked, it can do great damage to their decision-making ability and overall effectiveness. Here are some of the techniques I share with them for managing anxiety:

    Acknowledge your anxiety without denying it. Anxiety never shows up without a reason. So invite it in and try to understand why it’s manifesting right now. Ignoring your feelings and pushing them away never works. Instead, acknowledge your anxiety so you can begin to address it and manage it.

    Accept your anxiety without attachment. It’s not unusual to internalize anger along with anxiety. But the best way to ease the stress is to accept it without blame. If it makes you uncomfortable, name it. Because the more you try to control your anxiety, the harder it fights back. Avoid the tug of war by learning how to detach yourself and accept your anxiety. When you do, you’ve already made progress in moving through it.

    Surf the wave without getting swallowed up by the current. It may be impossible to get rid of your anxiety. As frustrating as that can feel, part of managing anxiety is understanding that you may not be in top form until things settle down. The goal is to learn to surf the waves of distress without being overwhelmed by their power.

    Watch for patterns and label your feelings. For most of us, anxiety comes with a pattern. It may be that stress leads to fear which leads to anxiety. Or it may be that something doesn’t work out, your perfectionist tendencies lead you to anger, and anxiety follows. Look for your individual patterns so you can label and understand the events and emotions that lead up to anxiety.

    Learn your telltale signs. When you’re feeling anxious, take note of your physical reactions. They often function as an early warning system to alert you to imminent anxiety. It might be a stomach flip, tense shoulders, or an inability to focus. Once you learn to recognize your physical symptoms, you can catch anxiety before it overtakes you.

    Let go of controlling anxiety and work to manage it. Victor Frankl famously said, “Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.” Instead of working to control the situation, choose your response. Make a conscious decision to manage your anxiety by breathing, shifting your attention, and taking small purposeful actions.

    Many leaders emphasize their strength, competence, and credentials in the workplace. Wouldn’t it be great if more of them opened up about how they learned to manage anxiety?

    Lead from within: Anxiety makes leadership interesting, but managing anxiety makes leadership meaningful—for you and for those you lead.

     

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How The Best Leaders Manage Their Anxiety appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 12:22:45 on 2020/05/05 Permalink
    Tags: , , Career, , , , , , , , ,   

    How The Best Leaders Are Already Planning Past The Crisis 


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    When a crisis disrupts the usual order of things, leaders can’t settle for just dealing with what’s in front of them today. They need to immediately begin looking ahead and planning for the future to make sure they’re prepared for what comes next—even if they have no idea what shape it will take.

    It may feel like a time to sit and wait, but in fact it’s a time to be proactive about the future—yours, your team’s, and your organization’s. Here’s how you can emulate the best leaders in planning through crisis.

    Brainstorm. Gather the sharpest minds and most insightful thinkers in your organization to discuss what the next months and years may look like. Spend time together exploring a range of scenarios and tracking for each of them how you can move the business and its people beyond the crisis.

    Discover opportunities and threats. In the discussion of each possible scenario, include a big-picture assessment of possible opportunities and threats, grounded in awareness that the crisis is changing not only your organization but also your industry and your customers.

    Create certainty about priorities. You can empower people through uncertainty if you hold true to the values and priorities that drive your team’s mission and communicate those values and priorities clearly and often. When everything is shifting, people need a North Star to navigate by.

    Lead with speed and agility. In unpredictable times you don’t have the luxury of playing wait and see—you must be proactive and able to move quickly and confidently in a new direction, with the willingness to pivot and make adjustments as events unfold.

    Learn from the present while planning for the future. As a crisis is unfolding, you’re learning something new in every moment. Make sure the most current information and trends are reflected in your strategic planning.

    Gain commitment from your people. Especially if you’re faced with moving in a new direction, your people need to fully commit to the vision and plan. That means it can’t be a top-down initiative—their voice and involvement are an important part of the process. Leadership based on collaboration and not control—trusting that people are smart and know what to do—fosters the commitment and energy your team needs to tackle the crisis and to continue a journey of growth when it’s over.

    Connect vision to mission. Any new vision must meet two criteria: it must be inspiring and it must be tightly aligned with your organization’s purpose.

    It’s easy in difficult times to become paralyzed by the day-to-day challenges. But it’s the leaders who think ahead with courage and vision who will achieve long-term success.

    Lead from within: The best leaders are always building on what is happening today to create successful future. When crisis hits, they keep their fears to themselves but share their courage and vision with others.

     

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How The Best Leaders Are Already Planning Past The Crisis appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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