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  • feedwordpress 08:00:40 on 2020/08/20 Permalink
    Tags: , , business, , , , , , , , , , , ,   

    How to Lead in an Anxious World 


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    We are living through a crisis with no modern-day precedent. Organizations of every size and type, from businesses and governments to hospitals and schools to faith communities and nonprofit organizations need leaders. We need people who can help others overcome their weakness and fear and come together to do better, more difficult things than any one of them could do on their own.

    But how does a leader bring inspiration and motivation in an anxious world? Here are some thoughts:

    Help people understand their stress. Especially in such a widespread, long-lived and exhausting crisis as the pandemic, it’s common for people to cope by trying to push their stress away. Some are reluctant to address their fatigue or even acknowledge their fears. The best leaders model healthy ways of viewing and dealing with their own stress, and they encourage others to own and address whatever they may be feeling.

    Encourage people to face their fears and take action. In the midst of the Great Depression, Franklin Delano Roosevelt famously told the nation, “We have nothing to fear but fear itself.” In other words, we have to meet the crisis head-on, because that is where we will find our strength. You cannot solve a problem until you face it, and you cannot find resolution in turning away. As a leader, you are charged with showing understanding to anxious people and then leading them to act.

    Deliver brutal honesty and bring people together in solidarity. Especially when those around you are anxious, it’s important to be brutally honest. Assess current and future threats frankly and transparently, because only then you can rally people together in solidarity, determination and resilience to weather the crisis collectively.

    Provide a purpose and distinct direction. When anxiety is present and fears are rampant, the best leaders invite people to serve with purpose in a defined direction. They assign clear roles and responsibilities and remind their team that their work matters and has value. When people know where they’re going and have a clear sense of the purpose, meaning and value behind what they’re doing, anxiety fades and focused action takes priority.

    Emphasize the power of agility and reassessment. When you’re hit by a crisis you’ve never experienced before, there’s no playbook or experience to guide your actions. That means you need to be a leader who can move through a changing landscape with flexibility, consistently testing what you’ve learned and reassessing your knowledge and strategy as you go. You will likely experience some blind alleys and reversals and failures, but they all play a role in moving through the crisis. Keep your message consistent with your actions, reminding your team that the crisis you’re experiencing gives you a powerful opportunity to do better and be better together.

    Lead from within: In a crisis the true leader will not waste any challenge. Instead, they will do what it takes to turn it into a memorable and meaningful opportunity.

     

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Lead in an Anxious World appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:40 on 2020/08/20 Permalink
    Tags: , , business, , , , , , , , , , , ,   

    How to Lead in an Anxious World 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    We are living through a crisis with no modern-day precedent. Organizations of every size and type, from businesses and governments to hospitals and schools to faith communities and nonprofit organizations need leaders. We need people who can help others overcome their weakness and fear and come together to do better, more difficult things than any one of them could do on their own.

    But how does a leader bring inspiration and motivation in an anxious world? Here are some thoughts:

    Help people understand their stress. Especially in such a widespread, long-lived and exhausting crisis as the pandemic, it’s common for people to cope by trying to push their stress away. Some are reluctant to address their fatigue or even acknowledge their fears. The best leaders model healthy ways of viewing and dealing with their own stress, and they encourage others to own and address whatever they may be feeling.

    Encourage people to face their fears and take action. In the midst of the Great Depression, Franklin Delano Roosevelt famously told the nation, “We have nothing to fear but fear itself.” In other words, we have to meet the crisis head-on, because that is where we will find our strength. You cannot solve a problem until you face it, and you cannot find resolution in turning away. As a leader, you are charged with showing understanding to anxious people and then leading them to act.

    Deliver brutal honesty and bring people together in solidarity. Especially when those around you are anxious, it’s important to be brutally honest. Assess current and future threats frankly and transparently, because only then you can rally people together in solidarity, determination and resilience to weather the crisis collectively.

    Provide a purpose and distinct direction. When anxiety is present and fears are rampant, the best leaders invite people to serve with purpose in a defined direction. They assign clear roles and responsibilities and remind their team that their work matters and has value. When people know where they’re going and have a clear sense of the purpose, meaning and value behind what they’re doing, anxiety fades and focused action takes priority.

    Emphasize the power of agility and reassessment. When you’re hit by a crisis you’ve never experienced before, there’s no playbook or experience to guide your actions. That means you need to be a leader who can move through a changing landscape with flexibility, consistently testing what you’ve learned and reassessing your knowledge and strategy as you go. You will likely experience some blind alleys and reversals and failures, but they all play a role in moving through the crisis. Keep your message consistent with your actions, reminding your team that the crisis you’re experiencing gives you a powerful opportunity to do better and be better together.

    Lead from within: In a crisis the true leader will not waste any challenge. Instead, they will do what it takes to turn it into a memorable and meaningful opportunity.

     

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Lead in an Anxious World appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 23:53:46 on 2020/07/13 Permalink
    Tags: business, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   

    The Importance of Every Customer Interaction 


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    We were shopping for a career coach for our son and reached out to someone who came highly recommended as one of the best in the business. “Robert” immediately sent us an email with a multi-page PDF of the services he could offer us. 

    Included was a category called interview preparation. For $250.00, Robert’s one-hour interview preparation service would provide clients with “live simulated interview practice” to help them clearly articulate their brand and answer difficult questions.

    My husband, son and I set up a phone interview using the conference line in my office.

    As the call began, we heard a lot of background noise making it difficult to hear. We were asking Robert questions, but his connection kept cutting out and he said he was having trouble hearing us. At first, I thought it was a problem with my conference connection until I heard what sounded like “Iced grande six-pump vanilla latte.”

    “Excuse me”, I interrupted, “did you say something”?

    “No, thank you, just one shot”, he answered. “Oh sorry, he continued, I’m at Starbucks.”

    Let me get this straight. Robert is being interviewed to work with our son. He offers services to help people improve their interview skills and articulate their brand. Yet his brand states ordering coffee is more important than paying attention. How can someone possibly offer interview preparation services if they don’t know how to conduct an effective interview?

    My father used to say, “actions speak louder than words.” It means people’s actions, not their words show their real attitudes.

    Someone can talk about being the best in the business, but nothing says that better than their behavior. Attitude, attention and approach to people from the moment you meet is what sets you apart. Whether pitching new business, delivering a presentation or attending a networking event, you have one chance to make a first impression.

    One of our clients calls this a “customer centric” approach. In their case, they’ve spent millions of dollars, put policies in place and re-structured their entire business model to truly become more customer centric. There are thousands of companies who claim to put consumers first. They have catchy taglines that say so, but that doesn’t mean it’s true.

    How often have you sat on hold for long periods of time listening to a recording telling you “your call is very important to us”? Then there’s the customer service line that says, “this call may be recorded for quality purposes”. What does that even mean? How about “calls may be recorded to help our employees handle your inquiries more effectively”?

    If you have any interest in truly improving customer interactions, begin by becoming your customer. How would you feel if you sat on hold waiting for your call to be recorded for quality purposes? Or what about apologies that ring hollow?

    A recent example of a bad hotel experience comes to mind when I took a team of coaches to a  meeting at a high-end resort in Orlando only to experience a tsunami of problems. My air conditioner wasn’t working and when I requested a room change, the front desk manager suggested I didn’t know how to work the air properly. No apology. My colleague had a water leak and had to switch rooms. No apology. That didn’t even compare to another coworker who, to her horror, woke up to cockroaches crawling on her ceiling, bed and floor.  Again, no apology. When they moved her to another room, the toilet wasn’t working and overflowed.

    Furious, I located the hotel manager who asked me what I wanted him to do. I demanded he take room and food charges off the bill, but he refused. He told me he gave the girl with the cockroach issue a $100.00 room credit. Considering the client was paying for the room, that was hardly satisfactory.

    When I got home, I took the issue to the top and got a call from a representative in the CEO’s office. She said she was sorry and offered me 15,000 hotel points, which can’t even buy a room for the night. I told her I wanted the hotel to apologize to my colleague who was traumatized by the roaches. They never did.

    Here is what I find astounding. In today’s world of social media, my colleague, who had photos and videos of the bugs could have sent those images around the world. She didn’t and wouldn’t, but how can any brand take that chance?

    The Harris Interactive Customer Experience Impact report says a happy customer whose issues are resolved tells 4-6 people about their experience.  Approximately 13% of dissatisfied customers will tell more than 20 people and those people will tell more people just as I’m telling you. The report says 86% of customers have quit doing business with a company due to bad customer experience.

    Every customer interaction is an opportunity to create positive experiences. When we treat others the way we want to be treated, we send positive silent signals that often speak louder than words.

    When we send silent negative signals, they can have long lasting damaging effects, sometimes without our knowledge. For example, after our call with Robert the career coach, as a courtesy, I thanked the person who recommended him. I also shared my experience. After referring him to dozens of people over the years, she is not likely to recommend him again.

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  • feedwordpress 08:00:07 on 2020/06/18 Permalink
    Tags: , business, , , , , , , , , ,   

    How to Prepare Your People for the New Normal 


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    As a coach working with CEOs and other leaders, I help my clients learn to be ready for what the future is likely to bring—and for the possibilities that they can’t see coming. Lately I’ve been focusing on helping them prepare themselves and their people for what’s being called the new normal—life after this initial phase of the crisis is over, when we return to a workplace that in many ways won’t be the same as the one we left.

    Here are some of the most important things you need to consider as you prepare your team for the weeks and months to come:

    If the team was struggling before, now they will be challenged even more. If your team found working together to be a struggle before the pandemic, they’ll be more challenged than ever. Even for those who come back in to work, office life will be different. Anything new takes extra effort and adds extra stress, so provide plenty of clarity and patience.

    If the team was used to a set process before, now they will need to make adjustments. A wide reassessment is happening everywhere: Is what we did six months ago still relevant today? Many teams will be required to pivot or revise their projects and projections. Not only processes but also organizational priorities and needs are changing.

    If the team was only semi-engaged before, now they will have to tune in more than ever. Even in the best teams, there are disagreements and conflicts. Where before people could work things out face to face, reconciling differences is going to remain difficult. Leaders must prepare their people to tune in to one another even more and find room to agree before disengagement can even begin.

    If the team had a hard time with accountability before, now they will have to be more responsible than ever. Change and uncertainty lead to anxiety and stress—which means no one on your team is likely to be at their best and problems become magnified. People who struggled with accountability before will be more likely to blame others. Coach your team to take ownership and model accountability for them.

    If decisions always came from the top before, now teams will have to learn to make them together. If there’s a silver lining to crisis, it’s that it shakes up structure. In the past weeks many teams have seen people across functions step up and speak up with effective results—and now that they’ve found their voices, taking them away would be both difficult and wrong. Leaders and teams alike need to learn a new style of collaborative decision making.

    The best leaders are preparing their people for the new normal, because they know that if their people are prepared, the rest of the organization will be aligned.

    Lead from within: Preparation is everything. Leaders know that when you fail to prepare, you are preparing to fail.

     

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Prepare Your People for the New Normal appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 20:48:14 on 2020/05/05 Permalink
    Tags: bad news, business, coaching, , , , , , , , , , , problem, ,   

    Quick Tip #98: How to Address the Elephant in the Room 


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    Delivering unpleasant news is difficult to do, especially during these challenging times. In our 98th Quick Tip Video, learn how to address the elephant in the room quickly and effectively.

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