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  • feedwordpress 10:41:43 on 2018/06/11 Permalink
    Tags: Boss, , , , , , ,   

    Here’s What You Do When You’re Smarter Than Your Boss 

    If you’ve ever had a boss who was truly inept–not the kind of inept where you hang up on people because you don’t understand how the office phones work, but truly unable to do their job–you know what a frustrating experience it is.

    If you’re like most people in that situation, you ended up spending much of your day covering the boss’s tracks, doing the things they couldn’t, fixing their mistakes (and sometimes covering up for them). And you probably went through a lot of resentment and anger–perfectly understandable for someone who’s trying to do their own job and their boss’s, while the boss draws a big paycheck and keeps going.

    If you’re in that situation now, you really know how rough it can be. But that doesn’t mean there’s nothing you can do. Here are some ideas to help you deal with being smarter than your boss:

    1. Never ever badmouth or gossip about your boss. Never say a bad work or talk behind their back. No matter how unqualified your boss is, complaining about it to others reflects badly on you–and it can interfere with your ability to advance in your career (or even transfer to another department to escape). Badmouthing and gossip are bad form, always.

    2. Be as useful as possible. Make yourself useful to your boss–and your team–by taking on what you can. Look for places where their points of weakness match your strengths, and focus yourself as much as possible in that area. Being useful is a great way to commend yourself to your boss, and to be noticed by those who are higher up.

    3. Be positive, not resentful. Try to find the silver lining and do what you can to learn as much as you can from the experience. Think about the opportunities for growth and visibility you’re gaining.

    4. Work with them, not against them. If you can concentrate on finding ways to work with your boss, not against them, things will go much more smoothly. Take a leadership role where you can–it will help you prepare for the day when you’re running the show.

    5. Never disagree publicly. Don’t contradict or embarrass your boss in front of others. When you disagree or point out a problem, do it privately and with respect.

    6. Don’t take it personally. This is a situation that happens all the time, and it’s not about you. Chances are that everyone is wondering how this person got to be the boss, but that’s not your concern. You can waste your energy complaining about it, or find a way to advance your own goals.

    7. Be respectful in communication. Whether you’re writing or speaking, don’t use any language or tone with your boss–or, for that matter, with anyone–that can come across as smug or superior or belittling. It may be a challenge if that’s how you’re feeling, but keep it to yourself.

    8. Focus on advancing your own career rather than bringing someone else down. Look for ways you can advance your own career instead of hoping for opportunities to point out your boss’ shortcomings. Take the high road.

    9. Don’t complain. You probably want to, and you may have plenty of reason. But don’t go above your boss’ head to complain. It may or may not help with the problem, but it will almost certainly hurt your own reputation. The one exception: if there’s a legal, ethical or safety issue at stake, you may need to report it. In that case, find out about whistleblower laws and any other protection that may apply.

    10. Start looking for another job. if you are doing all of this and it’s still taking a toll on you, it’s time to start looking for a job find a company where there is better opportunity for you and for you to advance.

    It’s never fun to work for a bad boss. But like most things, it does have a silver lining. You’re in a great position to build and demonstrate your own abilities, along with your problem-solving and people skills. If nothing else, someday it will turn into a great story you can tell.

     


    N A T I O N A L    B E S T S E L L E R

    THE LEADERSHIP GAP

    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post Here’s What You Do When You’re Smarter Than Your Boss appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 10:32:19 on 2018/06/11 Permalink
    Tags: Boss, , , , , , ,   

    What Happens When Your Boss Doesn’t Want You to Succeed 

    We all come across a terrible boss sooner or later. Maybe it’s a clash of generations, work styles or personalities. Maybe there are philosophical differences that are hard to bridge. Maybe they’re angry or frustrated over something in their own life, or just not a nice person. Maybe they feel a little threatened by your youth or your abilities.

    For whatever reason, there are few things that can throw you off your game at work more than wondering if your boss is undermining your success or even setting you up to fail.

    Here are some of the symptoms of a serious boss problem:

    1. Your boss ignores you. If your boss ignores or avoids you, it may mean that they find your presence frustrating or that they consider you unimportant. Aside from hurting your ego, this attitude can do huge damage as you’re cut out of the loop on important information and decisions.

    2. Your boss is hypercritical. If your boss is constantly singling you out as a negative example and criticizing you–especially in public–they’re damaging your self-image and the way others perceive you. Even if you’re struggling with something, that should inspire offers of help rather than scorn.

    3. Your boss micromanages you. Of course, some bosses micromanage everyone. But being singled out may signal a lack of trust. Micromanagement can also originate from poor delegation skills, but you can’t advance if you’re not entrusted with meaningful responsibilities on your own.

    4. Your boss withholds information. There are few things more directly undermining that withholding information. You’re left looking inept and foolish. If this happens, you may need to develop back-channel sources to find out what you need to know.

    5. Your boss doesn’t give you the projects aligned with your strengths. If you’re not getting projects that let you work to your strengths, volunteer to help with something that does. Keep finding ways to contribute and engage and show what you can do.

    Even with a good boss, these mishaps can happen now and then. But if it’s pervasive or habitual, you need to appoint yourself the CEO of your own destiny and start making a new plan.

    Sticking it out is a high-risk option–the people you most want to see leave have a way of staying in place forever, and the damage a bad boss can do to your career and your psyche is significant. Take care of yourself by walking away before it comes to that.

     


    N A T I O N A L    B E S T S E L L E R

    THE LEADERSHIP GAP

    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post What Happens When Your Boss Doesn’t Want You to Succeed appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 23:38:37 on 2018/06/10 Permalink
    Tags: Boss, , , , , , ,   

    12 Important Things Your Boss Wants You to Know 

    If you’ve ever had a boss who treated you and your fellow employees like a disposable commodity, you know how frustrating it feels. But there are two sides to every coin–how do you think of your boss? As a partner and trusted colleague? A mentor and role model? Or just the person who notices when you’re late for work?

    Here are some things your boss needs you to know:

    1.     I am human and I make mistakes. I get things wrong the same as anybody. Please give me the same understanding that you’d like me to give you when you blunder.
    2.     I need patience from you. I may not have been given a huge amount of training before I was given this title. I’m responsible for things I’m still learning about myself, and some of it’s happening by trial and error. (On the up side, I’m a believer in on-the-job learning.)

    3.     I’m interested. Your interests are important, but please remember that I also have to juggle the concerns and feelings of a bunch of other people, including people outside the team.

    4.     I’m always under pressure. I am almost always under enormous pressure that you hardly ever see. I will greatly appreciate anything you can do to make my job easier and any patience you can extend.

    5.     I need honest communication. If I do something dumb or ineffective, I need you to communicate with me. Talk to me directly; don’t hint or talk behind my back. Be honest with your communication, because that’s the way we learn from each other.

    6.     I need to see you doing, not just dreaming. if you are constantly telling me about your ideas and dreams and visions but you are not doing anything to implement any of them, it’s hard to take you seriously. I’ll do my part, but you have to do yours.

    7.     I value questions more than answers. If you don’t know something, ask. Don’t take the risk of trying to fake your way through things. Sometimes the questions are more important than the answers. I value curiosity, because if you ask the right questions the right answers will always present themselves.

    8.     We need to be a team and support each other. Your title and position aren’t as important as your abilities and ideas. I believe we are always a team, working together as a community; whether you’re a leader or a follower we need to support each other, collaborate, and act like a team.

    9.     I don’t like surprises. if something is going wrong, tell me. I don’t want to be surprised. Don’t be reluctant to bring me bad news–tell it as soon as you know. Don’t wait to share things I need to know.

    10.  Mutual respect is important. I may not be able to force you to respect me, but I can refuse to be disrespected. I will give respect and I will expect respect back. Respect is the foundation of relationships.

    11.  I don’t believe in cutting corners and or doing things unethically. if you ever feel pressured by our targets and our time frame to cut corners, don’t. If you ever feel the pressure to make things right by doing the wrong thing, don’t. Let your conscience be your guide and do what is right even if it’s hard.

    12.  I believe loyalty is a two -way street. The only people I owe my loyalty to are those who never give me cause to question theirs.

     


    N A T I O N A L    B E S T S E L L E R

    THE LEADERSHIP GAP

    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post 12 Important Things Your Boss Wants You to Know appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 23:23:35 on 2018/06/10 Permalink
    Tags: Boss, , , , , , , , ,   

    25 Dumb Mistakes That Very Smart Bosses Make 

    As a leadership coach and business consultant, I spend a lot of time thinking about people’s mistakes. And over the years I’ve learned that even the smartest people have errors in judgment, blind spots, and habits that get them into trouble.

    Here are some of the dumbest mistakes that the smartest leaders seem to be prey to:
    1.     Indecision. One of the worst things that can happen to any team or organization is an indecisive boss. A leader who moves their group in new directions based on new feedback at the drop of a hat, and never seems sure of the appropriate direction, will make employees crazy and never accomplish anything of substance.

    2.     Hiding behind closed doors. Whether they’re hiding something, afraid of confrontation, or just shy, leaders who stay behind a closed door miss countless opportunities to engage, connect with, inspire and be inspired by their team.

    3.     Breaking promises. People take what other people say as their word. If the boss don’t keep their promises, it creates a lack of trust that endures for many long years.

    4.     Making assumptions. People in power, especially, can do significant damage when they convince themselves they have a grasp of a situation and set out to make assumptions without a reality check.

    5.     Taking credit for the work of others. To take credit for anyone else’s work is egregiously wrong, but for a leader to take credit from their team members borders on unforgiveable.

    6.     Thinking they know it all. The worst thing a boss can do is stop being inquisitive and turn into someone whose response to everything is “I know….” The most valuable words to a leader are “I don’t know; I’ll find out.”

    7.     Fudging rules. Bosses who like lots of rules better be ready to enforce them consistently and hold themselves to the same standard.

    8.     Poor scheduling. Leaders who hold a team meetings on Friday afternoons an hour before everyone is supposed to leave and speak for two hours will never get a “world’s best boss” coffee mug.

    9.     Gossip. Gossip should never be tolerated, let alone participating in it, especially when it comes from the boss..

    10.  Bad communication. When as the boss you neglect to communicate important information or you leave out important details, you are jeopardizing those who work for you.

    11.  Thoughtless assignments. Some leaders make assignments seemingly at random, wasting highly skilled senior people on everyday tasks and handing the keys to high-stakes complex undertakings to unproven rookies without guidance or supervision.

    12.  Being secretive. A secretive boss is ultimately communicating a lack of trust, and their behavior sets the tone for the entire team or organization.

    13.  Bad timing. When leaders wait until the last minute to delegate time-sensitive projects, everybody looks bad.

    14.  Distraction are disruptive. Multitasking is always poor form when you’re engaged with other people. A boss who’s messing around on a screen means a team member isn’t being heard.

    15.  Visible carelessness. One common example: The boss gets a report to review and demonstrates with their comments that they missed critical details.

    16.  Clinging to dead wood… Implausible as it seems, I’ve heard from leaders who received resignations from their weakest team members and went on to persuade them to stay.

    17.   … while not guarding the treasure. The other side of the same coin: People let top performers go without even making an effort to keep them on board.

    18.  Promoting problems. Promoting a problem employee, even in hopes that they’ll eventually transfer to a different area, doesn’t solve the problem and calls the leader’s judgment into question.

    19.  Visible bias. Bosses who are racist, sexist, or biased against other groups may learn to cover up their words, but their policies and personnel decisions still call them out.

    20.  Opposition to professional growth. Poor leaders don’t consider learning and development to be important.

    21.  Constant complaints. Unrelenting negativity is always bad, but it’s even worse when it’s coming from the top.

    22.  Lack of feedback. Bosses who don’t provide appropriate feedback have no right to expect team members to improve.

    23.  Showing up impaired. The old-fashioned “three-martini lunch” is supposed to be a thing of the past, but it’s surprising how many leaders still imagine themselves to be above the rules that say you don’t show up for work drunk (even a little bit) or drugged.

    24.  Lack of vision. Leaders who just position themselves at the head of the line trudging through the daily grind without imparting a sense of the big picture aren’t really leading at all.

    25.  Showing off without justification. Photos with B- or C-list celebrities, diplomas from unaccredited or questionable colleges, certificates from every weekend training program–nothing fails more than an unimpressive attempt to impress.

     


    N A T I O N A L    B E S T S E L L E R

    THE LEADERSHIP GAP

    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post 25 Dumb Mistakes That Very Smart Bosses Make appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 23:12:10 on 2018/06/10 Permalink
    Tags: Boss, , , , , , ,   

    Congratulations! You Are the Boss–So Now What? 

    If you’re upwardly mobile in your career and you work for an organization, or if you’re an entrepreneur who plans to someday grow your business beyond what you can handle on your own, the day is going to come when you’re somebody’s boss.

    If you’re never held a leadership or supervisory position, the thought can be daunting. And being a first-time boss is never easy. For many, the biggest issue is finding the right balance between balancing your new responsibilities and managing the team. Here’s some good advice from people who remember their first days and weeks as the boss:

    1. Be prepared. Preparation is critical, especially if you’re starting out at a new organization. Learn everything you can about the company–especially its values, mission, and purpose. Make appointments with key people to learn resources and background information, and be diligent in studying any training materials. The more you know going in, the better boss you can be.

    2. Pivot your thinking: Many new managers make the mistake of thinking what got them there is going to keep them there. Your skills are important, but that’s not what will make you successful. Up to now, it’s been about your capabilities and competencies; now it’s about the people, and how to motivate them and inspire them to do excellent work. Remember, at the end of the day your performance will be tied to the that of your team.

    3. Know yourself and be yourself. Let people know who you are and what you value. An important early task is to identify your leadership message–what means the most to you and what your prioritizes are. When others can understand and trust you, respect is probably not far behind.

    4. Listen and learn. Your first impulse may be to come in, change things up, and fix everything in sight. Don’t do it. It’s time to listen. Hold individual and group meetings, and pay particular attention to what people tell you is and isn’t working. This gains you a huge amount of knowledge, and it lets your team know that you’re interested in their perspective. Try to make as few decisions as possible in the first 90 days.

    5. Cultivate your people skills. In a new leadership role, it’s easy to start thinking exclusively about productivity, process and procedures. But remember to work on connecting with the people around you. Get to know them and begin building those important relationships.

    6. Empower the people. Being a great boss means knowing that that the people on your team matter most. It’s important to connect and communicate, to show empathy and understanding, and to provide the resources they need to do their best and keep growing professionally.

    7. Build a community of shared experiences. To be successful you have to cultivate shared experiences for all–the kind of experiences that make a work group feel like a community. Working hard toward shared goals, being part of a compelling vision, and knowing that their voice is heard and their ideas are taken seriously. Make sure everyone on your team feels welcome to share their knowledge, experience, and vision..

    8. Give credit where it’s due. It’s tempting to want to add as much as possible to your personal “win” column, but the more you credit the group’s efforts and results above your own, the happier and more motivated your team will be, and the better you will all be able to work together next time.

    9. Be clear with your communication. If you cannot communicate you will not be successful. What you say is important; how you say it is even more important. Those who are listening need to understand your message, so the more precise and concise you are the more all of you can be successful.

    10. Make a roadmap. The best bosses and the greatest leaders know where they’re going, and where they’re taking people. They have a vision of the future and a strategy to guide them toward it. if you don’t know where you’re going you will have a very hard time getting there.

    11. Don’t obsess over your mistakes. This principle is part of the mindset that will either help you or hold you back. Remember that nobody is perfect–and even if perfection were attainable, it’s the journey, not the destination, where you learn to make things work.

    12. Make yourself accessible. The worst thing you can do is shut yourself behind a closed door and not be visible. As a new boss, you want to be visible and available and accessible. No matter how busy you are, you must leave your door open except for private calls and conversations.

    13. Be decisive. People like to know they are being led by someone competent. When the time comes to make a decision, don’t waffle and second-guess yourself. Any decision, even if it turns out to be wrong, is better than no decision at all. Learn from the bad decisions and enjoy the good ones.

    14. Maintain your balance. It’s good to throw yourself into your new responsibilities, but you don’t want find yourself burned out in a few weeks. Hold on to your life outside work and find ways to take a break from the stress. Balance work and fun with some time to reflect, unplug and reassess. It will make you happier–and more effective and productive.

    15. Ask for help if you need it. You don’t have to do it alone. Top leaders in every industry have coaches and mentors who help them figure things out and help along the way. It’s not about how capable you are, it’s about working on your strengths and keeping on point so you can be successful.

    16. Manage up. Even though you are the boss, remember that you still have a boss. And it’s more important than ever to build or maintain a strong relationship. Check in, ask questions when it’s appropriate, and share helpful information along with your team’s wins.

    Being a first-time boss is never going to be easy–but it’s 100 percent worth it. Keep your priorities clear and act on what’s important and you’ll be off to a great start.

     


    N A T I O N A L    B E S T S E L L E R

    THE LEADERSHIP GAP

    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    The post Congratulations! You Are the Boss–So Now What? appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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