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  • feedwordpress 08:00:50 on 2020/07/28 Permalink
    Tags: Bad Leadership, , , , , , , ,   

    Is Your Leader Really as Bad As You Think 


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    As with anything else in the world, there are good leaders and bad leaders. If you’ve experienced a really good leader, be thankful. And if you’ve ever worked with a horrible leader, you know what a miserable experience that is.

    If you’re in that situation now, though, consider the possibility that your leader isn’t as awful as you think. Maybe, just maybe, the person who needs to make some adjustments is you. Ask yourself truthfully if any of these descriptions sound like you:

    You tend to view the glass as half empty. Most of us like to think of ourselves as realists, but it’s possible that you’re looking at the world through a pessimistic or defeatist lens, coloring your perspective and even your outcomes. Maybe your leader isn’t the problem—or at least not the whole problem.

    You struggle with delegating. If you find yourself controlling or monitoring everything that everyone around you is doing, watching and commenting and picking apart the work of others, and struggling to delegate even when your boss tells you that you need to, you have a problem with micromanagement. Giving other people room to work without looking over their shoulder will improve your relationship with your boss—and with everyone else on your team.

    You keep stepping on toes. Overstepping is right next door to micromanagement, but it takes the form of doing tasks that fall completely outside your area of responsibility. When you overstep, you show a profound lack of faith in those around you, and ultimately in the leader who made the assignments. Your boss and others will be happier if you stay in your lane.

    You have all the answers and rarely ask questions. People who think they have all the answers don’t feel the need to ask questions. But if you don’t ask questions, you have no way of knowing if your answer is the best possible or if it’s completely inaccurate. If you aren’t seeking out as much information as you can to solve an issue, you’re part of the problem.

    You isolate yourself. There are times at work when you want to isolate yourself. You might have an urgent project or some work that requires intense concentration. And if you’re an introvert, you may work best alone. Isolation is a different matter. Refusing to engage with those around you leads to lost productivity and damaged relationships. Ask yourself if you should be more engaging and inclusive with your team

    If you suspect you’re guilty of any of these behaviors, know that you’re playing a major role in your own unhappiness. Instead of pointing fingers at your boss, change your own direction before you do lasting harm to your mental health or career success.

    Lead from within: Whether you’re a leader, manager, boss or person who aspires to become one, there is a lot you have to do to hone your craft. Don’t be one of those people who point fingers at others, because your leader might not be as horrible as you think.


    #1  N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Is Your Leader Really as Bad As You Think appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:50 on 2020/07/28 Permalink
    Tags: Bad Leadership, , , , , , , ,   

    Is Your Leader Really as Bad As You Think 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    As with anything else in the world, there are good leaders and bad leaders. If you’ve experienced a really good leader, be thankful. And if you’ve ever worked with a horrible leader, you know what a miserable experience that is.

    If you’re in that situation now, though, consider the possibility that your leader isn’t as awful as you think. Maybe, just maybe, the person who needs to make some adjustments is you. Ask yourself truthfully if any of these descriptions sound like you:

    You tend to view the glass as half empty. Most of us like to think of ourselves as realists, but it’s possible that you’re looking at the world through a pessimistic or defeatist lens, coloring your perspective and even your outcomes. Maybe your leader isn’t the problem—or at least not the whole problem.

    You struggle with delegating. If you find yourself controlling or monitoring everything that everyone around you is doing, watching and commenting and picking apart the work of others, and struggling to delegate even when your boss tells you that you need to, you have a problem with micromanagement. Giving other people room to work without looking over their shoulder will improve your relationship with your boss—and with everyone else on your team.

    You keep stepping on toes. Overstepping is right next door to micromanagement, but it takes the form of doing tasks that fall completely outside your area of responsibility. When you overstep, you show a profound lack of faith in those around you, and ultimately in the leader who made the assignments. Your boss and others will be happier if you stay in your lane.

    You have all the answers and rarely ask questions. People who think they have all the answers don’t feel the need to ask questions. But if you don’t ask questions, you have no way of knowing if your answer is the best possible or if it’s completely inaccurate. If you aren’t seeking out as much information as you can to solve an issue, you’re part of the problem.

    You isolate yourself. There are times at work when you want to isolate yourself. You might have an urgent project or some work that requires intense concentration. And if you’re an introvert, you may work best alone. Isolation is a different matter. Refusing to engage with those around you leads to lost productivity and damaged relationships. Ask yourself if you should be more engaging and inclusive with your team

    If you suspect you’re guilty of any of these behaviors, know that you’re playing a major role in your own unhappiness. Instead of pointing fingers at your boss, change your own direction before you do lasting harm to your mental health or career success.

    Lead from within: Whether you’re a leader, manager, boss or person who aspires to become one, there is a lot you have to do to hone your craft. Don’t be one of those people who point fingers at others, because your leader might not be as horrible as you think.


    #1  N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Is Your Leader Really as Bad As You Think appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:43 on 2020/06/25 Permalink
    Tags: Bad Leadership, , , , , , , , , , , ,   

    What is the Worst Leadership Styles and Why 


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    People who study leadership theory learn about numerous styles of leadership: autocratic, democratic, strategic, transformational—on and on. It can be interesting to debate the pros and cons of each.

    But whatever theory you subscribe to—or if you’re a self-taught leader who doesn’t believe in theories—there are some styles of leadership that are always detrimental. Here are a few of the worst:

    Know-it-all leadership. People don’t admire leaders who pretend to know everything and insist that whatever they do is right. Leaders who think they’re smarter than everyone else create isolation and quickly come to be resented by their peers and the people on their team.

    Absent leadership. Some leaders are physically absent—always away at a meeting or conference, wandering somewhere else in the building or working from home. Many more are physically present and may even pride themselves on being accessible because their office door is always open. But if they’re distracted and checked out, never really listening or pitching in, they might as well be somewhere else.

    Inflexible leadership. A leader’s behavior is the single biggest factor they bring to bear on influencing others. Agile, creative leadership has the power to energize, engage and motivate people to go the extra mile for their organization. But a leader who’s inflexible and stubborn creates demotivation, poor performance, frequent absences, and high turnover.

    Micromanaging leadership. Micromanagement has a devastating effect on even the best teams, destroying morale and productivity. Part of the problem is that most micromanagers aren’t even aware of what they’re doing. They’re often the ones saying “I don’t believe in micromanagement, but…”. Effective leadership means a commitment to focus on the big picture and on motivating employees, not standing over their shoulder.

    Self-serving leadership. Ego can undermine leadership in two ways. The first is false pride, when you focus on self-promotion and making yourself look good even at the expense of your team or peers. The second is self-doubt or fear, when you lose confidence and question yourself and your abilities. They move in different directions, but they’re equally destructive.

    Leadership by intimidation. Those who lead from fear are often terrified of looking weak, but in trying to look strong they fail themselves and their team. Instead of sharing a vision that motivates, they threaten and complain. Instead of analyzing problems and looking for solutions, they focus on placing blame. Talented team members find new options, leaving only mediocre performers who are lacking enough in confidence to allow themselves to be bullied on a daily basis.

    At the end of the day, every leader has their own preferred style. The important thing is to be aware of what style you’re putting out there and to check in periodically to make sure it’s serving your team and yourself well.

    Lead from within: It’s said that the best sign of a good leader is not how many followers they have, but how many leaders they create. If your leadership style is right, your influence will quickly spread.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post What is the Worst Leadership Styles and Why appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:09 on 2019/09/10 Permalink
    Tags: Bad Leadership, , , , , , , , ,   

    How to Immediately Spot a Bad Leader 


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    As the old saying goes, sitting in a garage doesn’t make you a car. And sitting in an office with a leadership title on the door doesn’t make you a leader—or at least not a good one.

    Most organizations have at least a few bad leaders. Maybe they weren’t prepared to take on a leadership role, or they’re temperamentally unsuited to leadership, Maybe they had bad models to emulate. Or maybe they just don’t care.

    Whatever the cause, you don’t have to look too deep or too far to spot them, because there are traits that almost all bad leaders display on a daily basis. If a leader in your organization exhibits any of these traits, be on alert. Bad leadership doesn’t just affect people who are directly on that person’s team; it carries over and eventually can poison an entire organization.

    The egotistical leader. If you’ve ever been around a self-centered leader, you already know how skilled they are at making everything about themselves. A leader who doesn’t understand the concept of putting the mission and the team above themselves will never gain the confidence, loyalty and trust of those they lead.

    The leader who relies on fear. Many leaders actually pride themselves on leading by creating a culture of fear. They believe that fear will get people to listen to them as a leader—but fear is a sign of weakness, not strength. And the price for being feared is that you’re not respected.

    The leader who avoids conflict. Conflict happens in the workplace all the time, and when a leader avoids conflict in hopes that it will disappear on its own, they are making a mistake. A good leader approaches conflict with an open mind and a proactive plan, so people understand there is a solution. Conflict avoidance only breeds more conflict.

    The know-it-all leader. The best leaders are keenly aware of how much they don’t know. They have no need to be the smartest person in the room, but they do have a determination to learn from others. A leader who isn’t curious, who doesn’t ask lots of questions, isn’t actually leading.

    The leader who isn’t trustworthy. When a leader says one thing and does another, they are not only not accountable but they come across as irresponsible. Real leaders expect to be held to their word.

    The leader who steals the credit. It takes a team to do great things. When a leader takes sole credit for an accomplishment, it disempowers others to work as hard. The best leaders empower and motivate their team with recognition and appreciation.

    The leader who doesn’t listen. Leaders know a lot and they want to communicate what they know—but if they don’t listen at least as much as they speak, they won’t learn from those they lead. Being a bad listener means being a bad leader.

    The leader who thinks they’re always right. An organization where the leader is always right—and everyone who has a different perspective is always wrong—doesn’t leave any room for communication, discussion or sharing thoughts or ideas. All it accomplishes is shutting down productivity and effectiveness.

    The micromanaging leader. A micromanager feels they have to do everything themselves, or control they manner and timing of every team member’s work, to make sure it’s done their way. When they do, they discredit their people’s talents and capabilities.

    The negative leader. When you have a leader who always focuses on the negative, just moving forward can be extremely difficult. Negativity creates a culture of pessimism and gloom that makes achievement seem impossible.

    If any of your leaders display these traits, it’s important to develop a strategy for dealing with them. If you’re working under them, ask yourself if they’re impairing your ability to do your job and possibly harming your career and reputation, and consider asking for a move away from their area—or even leaving for a different organization. If you’re above them in leadership, you’ll need to weigh whether you want to give them a chance to develop better habits, taking into account what’s best for your company, your people, and the success of your brand.

    Lead from within: Not everyone in leadership understands what it takes to lead. Most bad leaders believe their way is the right way, and the best strategy is usually to distance yourself as much as possible.


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Immediately Spot a Bad Leader appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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