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  • feedwordpress 21:31:41 on 2020/06/30 Permalink
    Tags: Attitude, bad boss, bad manager, , , , difficult situations, ,   

    Dealing With a Difficult Boss 


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    Working with people has its pros and cons. When you work with others you are able to bounce around ideas, collaborate, get feedback, and share knowledge. However, when you work with difficult people, you may experience resistance. In the past, we’ve touched on how to deal with difficult people but let’s face it, dealing with…
     
  • feedwordpress 14:00:00 on 2020/05/21 Permalink
    Tags: adaptibility, Attitude, , , development for assistants, , ,   

    How Assistants Can Adapt to Change 


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    A natural reaction to change is fear of the unknown. Many assistants would much rather stay in their comfort zones where they feel safe and secure. However, change is a must if we want to grow in our careers, in our relationships, and as a person. While the thought of it may seem challenging, change…
     
  • feedwordpress 14:30:00 on 2020/04/22 Permalink
    Tags: Attitude, ,   

    Embrace a Warrior Mindset – The Ultimate Guide for Assistants 


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    In life and our professions, we are going to experience chaos. Whether as a result of organizational restructuring, economic downturns, family hardship or otherwise. Feelings of overwhelm, high workload demands, time constraints and communication barriers with family and colleagues can feel especially turbulent during times of stress.

    In this Warrior Mindset blog, we are going to cover the 5 steps you need to take to overcome chaos:

    1. Changing your view of yourself and your perception
      a. See yourself as being unstoppable
      b. See yourself bigger than the evil
    2. Don’t be afraid to lean into battle
    3. The attitude of “I’ve got this!”
    4. Practice discipline
    5. Adaptability skills

    At the end of this blog, there is a helpful video that goes into detail on each of the steps above. If you are ready to better yourself and your career as an Assistant, read on.

    Having a Warrior Mindset is more than aggressiveness and determination; it is about overcoming challenges and adversity. It is about possessing, understanding, and being able to utilize a set of psychological and physical skills that allow someone to be effective, adaptive, and persistent.

    During times of chaos, many executives and organizations are dealing with the effects brought on by change. Their days are later and their priorities have shifted. As their partner, you may find that your days, tasks, and action items have as well. Rather than let the overwhelm consume you, you too must be strategic with your approach. How do you do that?

    It starts with changing your view of yourself and your perception. This takes

    place in your mind. Our viewpoint shrinks or expands in proportion to our courage. The less courage we embrace, the more pessimistic we become. The more courage we embrace, the more optimistic we become. You must see yourself as being unstoppable. Try to picture putting up your shield every time the enemy comes at you (the enemy being workload demands, economic and family crises, organizational restructuring, etc.) and being bigger than the evil.

    Don’t be afraid to lean into battle. You must have an attitude of “I’ve got this! No problem. Go ahead—throw the curveballs at me.” It’s through adversity that you’ll develop resilience.

    Practice discipline. Whether at work or home, you are bound to encounter challenges. Children may require your attention, you may lose motivation or begin to feel unfulfilled with your current workload demands. When these situations occur, the power of commitment and discipline can help you stay on track.

    Warriors are adaptable. Even the best-laid plans will have to be modified. You must be able to think under stress and on the run. The thing is, as assistants, you do this ALL the time. How many times in the day have you had to change meetings, schedules, and travel plans? The difference between your “usual” chaos and championing chaos like a warrior is the speed at which you must think and operate. Here is what warriors do:

    • They aren’t afraid to bend or break the rules if the situation calls for it.
    • They adapt as things unfold.
    • If they lose their weapon, they will find another.
    • If one path is blocked, they will find another.
    • They focus on the end goal and will achieve it however possible.

    Disasters and chaotic times dramatically impact the workplace, affect productivity and rattle nerves. However, with a Warrior Mindset and the right skills, you will be able to thrive. Our Survival Tactics Series for Chaotic Times assistant webinar series provides actionable information through 6 developmental topics.

    Survival-Tactics-For-Administrative-Professionals

    The post Embrace a Warrior Mindset – The Ultimate Guide for Assistants appeared first on Office Dynamics - Executive And Administrative Assistant Training.

     
  • feedwordpress 13:00:04 on 2019/08/14 Permalink
    Tags: Attitude, , , , , , ,   

    Emotional Intelligence for Administrative Assistants 


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    I have grown to love speaking on and teaching assistants about emotional intelligence. This definitely is a skill every assistant needs to know. This is a skill you can use every single day!

    In our World Class Assistant course, we cover this topic and participants work on real work world case studies. They are scenarios that assistants can relate to. I reference Daniel Goleman for my classes and want to share this with you. Please quickly evaluate your level of emotional intelligence in each of the four dimensions.

    Daniel Goleman, author of Working with Emotional Intelligence says, “Emotional intelligence is the ability to sense, understand, and effectively apply the power and acumen of emotions as a source of human energy, information, connection, and influence.

    Daniel also says:

    False:

    • The common view is that emotions are things that happen to us.
    • Emotions don’t belong in business.

    True:

    • Emotions are an inner source of energy, influence, and information.
    • They are inherently neither good nor bad. It is what we do with emotions that make the difference.

    The 4 Dimensions:

    #1:    Self-Awareness (I know me.)

    • Recognize how your feelings affect your performance.
    • You are open to candid feedback.

    #2:    Self-Management (I manage me.)

    • Self-control.
    • Admit mistakes.

    #3:    Social Awareness (I try to know you.0

    • Pay attention to emotional cues.
    • Adapt communication style to compliment others.

    #4:    Relationship Management (I attempt to facilitate situations for a positive outcome.0

    • Step forward as needed, regardless of your position.
    • Model the change you expect from others.

    One of our top trainers, Julie Reed, has been teaching several of our World Class Assistant™ certification/designation courses. When I asked Julie, what were her favorite lessons from emotional intelligence, she shared the following:

    • I manage me. I am in charge of my attitude.
    • I choose to not react.
    • I am resilient; I practice positive self-esteem, and I chose to ignore the haters.
    • I am confident in my skills and aware of my weaknesses.
    • I stay true to my North Star.
    • I manage me – I hold myself accountable and, I mitigate risks to my reputation and build my credibility equity. This, in turn, has gotten me invited to the table, as an active participant, confidant, and leader.

    Which dimensions of emotional intelligence do you need to work on? Why not start today?

    Joan Burge

    training_for_executive_assistants

    What it means to be a World Class Assistant™:

    • You’re a career-minded administrative professional looking to build powerful partnerships with your executive(s) and organization.
    • You’re a power player who wants to reap more rewards from your efforts – and you’re not afraid to do what it takes to get there.
    • You’re committed to the administrative profession as well as your career growth and you’re eager to demonstrate this.
    • You’re a high-performing individual who wants to succeed both in your professional and personal life.
    • You’re ready to have the kind of breakthrough experience that takes you off the sidelines and puts you right in the middle of the game.

    What are you waiting for?

    The post Emotional Intelligence for Administrative Assistants appeared first on Office Dynamics - Executive And Administrative Assistant Training.

     
  • feedwordpress 18:08:16 on 2019/05/02 Permalink
    Tags: , Attitude, , , , , ,   

    How Do I Tactfully Voice My Concern? – Ask an Admin 


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    training_for_administrative_assistants

    Executive Assistants and Administrative Assistants have to deal with a lot. Whether that is working remotely, working with several managers or executives, and sometimes supporting an entire floor of employees! Usually, these difficult situations bring up situations that leave them asking, “how do I tactfully voice my concern?”

    Heather D. asks us:

    I am a Certified Executive Administrative Professional and have been an Executive Assistant (EA) for the last 15 years to a VP of my former employer where we had a very good Business Partner relationship. I have since been forced to leave that employer almost 2 years ago now due to downsizing and am in a different EA role with a quickly growing company reporting to both the CEO and CFO.

    The role posted was framed up that I would be supporting them in the day to day activities much like an EA role does however since the day I was hired I have simply been a  “taskmaster/office manager” doing miscellaneous office/employee relations type tasks with very little interaction with either the CEO or CFO including my mid-year and end of the year evaluations. Both senior leaders have grown with the company for the last 28+ years and have never had what we know to be a true EA and aren’t interested in my role evolving to that at all. They did, however, hire a VP of Sales this past July that I was told I would be supporting as well and that he is being groomed to replace the CEO within the next 1-2  yrs. As part of this VP’s onboarding, I got to know him well and he had a true EA in the last 15 years with his former employer and would like to have one here.

    The CEO, CFO and this new VP of Sales all agreed that most of my time should be supporting him and that the VP of Sales was given the go-ahead to rewrite my job description however I don’t report to him or sit near him and both of those are necessary, in my opinion, to do this EA role the most efficiently and effectively (not to mention an accurate job description). The problem is that this company is moving and growing so quickly with “multiple hot irons in the fire” all the time that neither the CEO or the VP of Sales has had any time to see this transition through and it has been about 2 months since they last told me this transition was happening.

    My question is should I be approaching my direct leader (who I have no interaction with), the CEO or the new VP of Sales (which is who I have been working 50-75% of the time for in the last 6 months)? How do I approach this respectfully and voice my concerns in a firm manner around the current reporting/relationship structure?

    Well that is actually a very tough question! How do you tactfully voice your concern as an administrative professional without causing trouble?


    Want to learn more about Ask an Admin and how to submit your own question? Click here

    The post How Do I Tactfully Voice My Concern? – Ask an Admin appeared first on Office Dynamics - Executive And Administrative Assistant Training.

     
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