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  • feedwordpress 17:15:32 on 2019/09/04 Permalink
    Tags: Assertive, , , , ,   

    6 Ways for Assistants to Gain Respect 


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    A powerful, but underutilized, way for administrative and executive assistants to gain respect and be taken seriously is to exude executive presence. Forbes.com define executive presence as the ability to project gravitas–confidence, poise under pressure and decisiveness. Furthermore, communication—including speaking skills, assertiveness and the ability to read an audience or situation—and appearance contribute to a person’s perceived executive presence.

    When you create executive presence, you are taken more seriously in the workplace and your voice is more clearly heard. Executive presence is a combination of business expertise, competence in a chosen profession and ability to build or connect with others. You do that by:

    1. Delivering information in “headlines.” In my World Class Assistant™ course, attendees will ask me what this means. Just think of a newspaper. We see headlines, right? So, when you are communicating with executives or managers, keep it short, simple, and to the point. They don’t have time for the back story.

    2. Communicating with passion and energy. You get people’s attention when you do this. A goal in communicating is to get people to listen to us. Maybe our goal is to get them to buy into an idea or try something new. Even daily, you can speak with more liveliness. I notice when I speak with more energy, I actually feel energized!

    3. Speaking up. Use strong and clear language. You can do this in a way that does not make you appear to be aggressive.

    4. Using a confident tone. It’s very hard to convince or persuade someone when you come across as hesitant just by the tone of your voice. I recently worked with a CEO of a top Fortune 500 company and coached his assistant. The CEO told me he does not like it when his assistant does not sound confident about something when he asks her a question. The example had to do with a meeting whereby the assistant did not sound sure of the information when questioned by her executive.

    5. Engaging people in conversation. Don’t wait for people to ask you question or start a conversation. We project confidence when we reach out to others and initiate conversation. You will be amazed at how positively people will respond to you when you pay attention to and show an interest in them.

    6. Learning to read your audience or the situation and adapt as necessary. It’s just like what I must do as a speaker and trainer. If I am good at my craft, I pay attention to my audience. I don’t just keep going ahead with what I want to say without noticing how my audience is responding. Your audience may be one or two people. But if you are to be successful, you need to be aware of what is going on with the other person and adapt, if necessary.

    In my World Class Assistant™ course, attendees get to practice projecting executive presence. We do this on the third (last) day of class. They present as a team and discuss the benefits they derived from attending the WCA course. To make it real, the assistants pretend they are presenting to their executives. Each person in the group demonstrates their newly learned skills.

    I hope you will practice the above-mentioned techniques. I am positive you will see results.

    training_for_executive_assistants

    “Of all the programs offered by other training companies that I’ve attended, World Class Assistant™ was much more comprehensive and intense. This program is head and shoulders above the rest! It continues to help raise the bar.”

    – Jennie Forcum, CWCA

    Our World Class Assistant™ course typically sells out so act fast!  In order to deliver a cutting edge, unique experience, we intentionally keep class sizes small.  Don’t spend too long on the fence.  You’ll miss the opportunity of a lifetime!

    Learn More and Register Here.

    The post 6 Ways for Assistants to Gain Respect appeared first on Office Dynamics - Executive And Administrative Assistant Training.

     
  • feedwordpress 12:00:13 on 2019/08/06 Permalink
    Tags: Assertive, , , , ,   

    Set Healthy Boundaries at Work 


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    An important component to self-management versus stress-management is to set healthy boundaries in the workplace. In this article what kind of boundaries and with whom.

    As administrative assistants and executive assistants, you can often feel like setting boundaries might get you fired or your leader will think you are not a team player. Some people think when I’m talking about setting boundaries, it has to do with sexual harassment in the workplace.

    Boundaries can be set any time, any place, on anything, and with any person. I’ll give you a perfect example. I was at McCarran Airport in Las Vegas waiting in the security line and was in line to pass my carry on through the screening process. (Keep in mind; I travel quite frequently for business, so I know what I’m doing.) I was quickly placing my laptop in the bin, folding my raincoat up, taking off my shoes, and putting my purse on the conveyer when all of a sudden, this young woman who had been in line behind me, stepped right in front of me with 2 suitcases and placed them on the conveyer. She still needed to take off her shoes – and she didn’t know she was supposed to take off her jacket.

    You are probably thinking, “So what?” So what? It was rude that she thought she could just jump in front of me especially when she wasn’t ready. It was not as if she said, “May I go ahead of you?” I nicely told her that she couldn’t cut in front of me. Of course, she looked at me in shock and made a few comments. (I will spare the details of our back and forth dialogue.) She finally took her items and moved behind me and told me to have a nice day.

    A boundary in the office for an administrative assistant can be as simple as addressing a coworker or manager who constantly steps into your workspace and takes your desk supplies without asking and doesn’t return them.  If that bothers you, say something.

    Another boundary you might need to set is your accessibility after hours to your leader as far as emails go. This is becoming problematic for assistants all over the world. As I travel and talk to hundreds of administrative office professionals ranging from administrators to executive assistants, I’m hearing them say they are spending too much of their personal time (evenings or weekends) managing and/or responding to emails from their leader.  One administrative assistant said that her manager did not expect her to check business emails or take action on non-work hours.  But she wanted to get a jump on things or was curious as to what was going on or wanted to read emails on Sunday night to be prepared for Monday morning. The problem is… she started responding to her leader’s emails and taking action steps if required. Today, she is frustrated because she spends 50% of her weekend working. I told her, “You created the monster.”  It wasn’t required of her and while she thought nothing of it at first, it snowballed and now she will have to say something to her leader.

    • First, do not create situations that you will later regret.
    • Second, people will act as we allow them to. If you don’t say something when something isn’t right, then the person assumes it is okay.
    • Third, professionally communicate when setting boundaries yet be firm.

    Healthy boundaries are good for you and those you work with.  It teaches them how to work with you in a way that stimulates win-win situations. You enjoy your work environment and are more enjoyable to work with. You are confident, peaceful, in control (not walked over), respected, like a peer or business partner and viewed as a leader. Consider what types of boundaries you might need to implement this week.

    Learning Highlights
    You will learn: 

    • How to evaluate your current communication and boundary-setting style so you can build on your strengths and address areas for improvement.
    • Why assertiveness in the workplace matters, especially for assistants, how it benefits you and what it really means. (Hint: It is often totally misunderstood!)
    • How to recognize and minimize the risk involved so your message is received and your professional image remains intact.
    • How to appropriately set limits, voice your ideas and opinions, and articulate your needs using thoughtful, diplomatic communication techniques.
    • 7 essential action steps for becoming a more assertive assistant. (You will hear examples and learn specific language to use in common challenging workplace situations.)

    60% OFF until 8/9/19 – Use code: HEALTHY

    The post Set Healthy Boundaries at Work appeared first on Office Dynamics - Executive And Administrative Assistant Training.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:15:44 on 2019/06/12 Permalink
    Tags: Assertive, , , , ,   

    Getting Things Done 


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    Getting things done in the workplace is one of my favorite topics to speak on and write about. I have been passionate about this topic for 28 years. Administrative assistants continue to struggle with how to keep up with all the demands placed upon them in a time-compressed world and yet maintain quality.

    I will share with you some of my favorite tips. And you can get more tips on this subject by going to Office Dynamics YouTube Channel.

    Coping with Conflicting Priorities

    • Ask for specific deadlines. Do not accept the “a.s.a.p.” answer. How many times do you ask a manager or someone who is giving you a task, “How soon do you need this?” The typical response is “as soon as possible.” Change your question and you will get a different response. Instead ask the person, “By when is the latest I can get this to you?”
    • Early in the day, clarify with your manager(s) what are the most important priorities. I highly recommend doing this first thing in the morning as what you thought was a priority at 5:00 pm the day before, could have totally changed because your manager (like many others) is working at night and early morning. Always clarify the top 3 priorities for the day.  
    • When struggling with which “A” priority to do first, ask yourself, “What is the impact of not getting this done today?”

    Organizing Your Workspace

    An organized workspace reduces stress, gives the impression to others that you are on top of things, and saves you time.

    • Remember your workspace is a part of your professional image.
    • Your workspace is not storage space.
    • Place the most frequently used items closest to you.
    • Use desk trays to keep paper items and folders neatly organized.
    • Your inside drawers matter too.

    Neutralize Information Overload

    We are exposed to a tremendous amount of information in a day.

    • Don’t read everything that comes your way. Learn to scan information and determine which items really need attention.
    • Assess your information sources. Make sure the source of information is credible.
    • Use your highlighter to mark important information, deadline dates, or aha information. (electronic or hard copy)

    Tips to be Productive

    • Standardize your processes.
    • When given a project or task, try to get all the information at once. Many times, your manager just gives you bits of information. Be assertive and ask for more details or get the bigger picture to reduce back and forth time or going off on the wrong tangent.
    • Establish some quiet time throughout the day to re-assess your priorities.
    • Recognize the time of day you are most productive. At that time of day, do your most intense work or the work that will take a great deal of focus or brainpower.
    • Throughout the day, as you are doing your work, search for simpler and faster ways to do that task.

    Don’t confuse. . .

    . . . activity with results

    . . . hard work with results

    . . . efficiency with results.

    You can be active and very busy but running around in circles. A professional is someone who cares about the results, not just the activity.

    The post Getting Things Done appeared first on Office Dynamics - Executive And Administrative Assistant Training.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:48 on 2019/06/06 Permalink
    Tags: Assertive, , , , , , Pushover, ,   

    How to Avoid Being a Pushover at Work 


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    In any group of people, some will be more assertive than others. Many of those who aren’t assertive by nature face a constant battle to avoid crossing the line into passivity. Even the most laid-back people don’t want to be a pushover.

    If your lack of assertiveness has become unhealthy—or is starting to take a turn in that direction—start by asking yourself where the issues are coming from. Maybe you feel you need to please people, or you want to be liked, or you think silence shows your strengths.

    Whatever your reasons, being a pushover won’t raise you in anyone’s estimation. It means you’re being taken advantage of. And when you’re tired of it, here are some smart steps you can take as you learn to stand up for yourself with confidence:

    Get to know your triggers. What situations freeze you up the most? What people or areas do you associate with problems? The more you understand what’s going on, the better you can combat it. Becoming mindful of self is the first step to making a change.

    Learn to prioritize. If you’re saying yes to too many things, spend more time thinking through priorities. Start with the things that are most central to your role and responsibility. When you focus on your priorities, it’s easier to say no to the things that will interfere with them.

    Practice saying no. The best way to change your responses is to learn a new behavior, and at the core of not being a pushover is mastering the art of respectfully but firmly saying no. A good starting place is my blog post “17 Different Ways to Say No.” Remember that the best way of getting good at anything is to keep practicing, and that learning to say no gives you more room to say yes to the things you really want to do.

    Offer solutions. If you find yourself presented with impossible requests, try to present a solution or an alternative resolution that will help achieve fill the need without making it your responsibility. Learn to be part of the solution without taking over ownership of someone else’s problem.

    Stop saying you’re sorry. If you have a tendency to be a pushover, you likely find yourself apologizing often. Try to eliminate “sorry” from your vocabulary except in situations where you’ve actually made an error or caused harm. The next time someone wants to dump something on your lap, just say no and let it go. Offer an alternative if you’re able, but don’t apologize for not taking on something that wasn’t yours to begin with.

    Enlist the help of others. It’s hard to change behavior on your own, so enlist a group of people to support you. Find friends, colleagues or a coach who can keep you assertive and accountable. Create yourself an inner circle of people you can count on to help you set appropriate limits.

    Keep practicing. Like everything else in life, learning to stand up for yourself takes practice. Remind yourself daily to be confident and firm. It may be difficult at first, but you’ll be happier in the long run.

    If you’re among the pleasers, the sacrificers, the doers, the martyrs, remember that being a pushover is not a sign of strength but a gap in your leadership.

    Strength will come from standing up for yourself, learning to say no, coming up with solutions and being confident. When you stop sacrificing yourself to please others, you can showcase your strengths.

    Lead from within: The worst way to lead is to try to please everyone, because you end up pleasing no one—least of all yourself.

     


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    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

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    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Avoid Being a Pushover at Work appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 20:10:13 on 2019/04/04 Permalink
    Tags: , Assertive, , , , , ,   

    How to Help Your Manager Get Things Done – Ask an Admin 


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    If you are an Administrative Professional looking for your questions to be answered by your peers, then this is the place for you! This is the best blog for advice for administrative assistants and executive assistants provided by Office Dynamics International.

    This week Renee C. asks:

    As an administrative assistant, how do you get your supervisor to complete his tasks and get things done, especially in a timely manner and meet deadlines? I’ve tried everything from whiteboards of projects to various types of folders with deadlines, to scheduling time in outlook, sending reminders (email, outlook, paper) to standing weekly meetings with him. Things don’t get done nor do they get done in a timely manner. I don’t know what other methods and/or processes to use.

    Wow! Ok, Renee is wondering how does an administrative assistant manage her manager or executive? Does Renee start with managing deadlines, learning how to schedule properly? Or does this frustrated administrative assistant need to build on her partnership with her executive? How do you help your manager get things done?

    We have several tools that actually can help with this but we want to see what you have to say!


    If you have a question that you would like to submit, please send it to officedynamics.aaa@gmail.com and include the name you would like us to use.

    If you want to subscribe to our blog so you don’t miss any posts, please visit https://officedynamics.com/blog/ and subscribe in the right-hand column.

    If you’ve submitted your response on our Ask an Admin blog post, please be patient to see your response and other responses. We have to manually approve them to prevent spammers and profanity. If you do not see your response right away, please give it time and revisit. We apologize for this but this is the best way we can keep YOUR blog clean! Thank you, everyone!

    The post How to Help Your Manager Get Things Done – Ask an Admin appeared first on Executive And Administrative Assistant Training - Office Dynamics.

     
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