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  • feedwordpress 14:45:59 on 2017/02/01 Permalink
    Tags: , administrative professional, , , executive and assistant, , , , , , , free webinar for administrative assistants, , free webinar for executive assistants, ,   

    Building the Partnership with Your Executive: Are You a Center of Influence? 

    executive_assistant_partnershipHigh-quality assistants can be a distinct competitive advantage for executives and the organizations they serve. Here at Office Dynamics, we are constantly reminded of this when we help executive and assistant teams develop truly strategic partnerships.

    As one Fortune 500 CEO puts it, “Administrative Assistants are the center of influence.” He describes his assistant as a “flow manager,” meaning she helps facilitate progress. She has the power to keep things moving at an optimal pace.

    As an assistant, we want to help you position yourself as a center of influence for your executive. A strong strategic partnership between the executive and assistant is built on this idea.

    So, what does that mean for you? Well, for most assistants, it means taking on more. As a center of influence, everything should flow through you—calendar appointments, meeting information, phone calls, projects and more.

    You should be the buffer or filter for your executive. You are a conduit for collecting information, processing it, and sending it back out in the appropriate fashion. This allows your executive to focus his or her attention where it is most needed, with the peace of mind that you will ensure nothing falls through the cracks.

    Most assistants agree that this is a tall order! It requires a deep level of trust and constant communication. The executive must be willing to release control of certain items and allow the assistant more authority and responsibility. The assistant must be able to shoulder that responsibility capably.

    When exploring this idea, many assistants express fear. After all, being a center of influence is challenging. It forces you into a position where you are, quite literally, at the center of the storm. It’s a powerful and dangerous place to be.

    But you are more than capable of stepping up to the challenge! And the rewards are extraordinary. You will experience greater job satisfaction when you contribute more meaningfully. You will experience greater professional growth and financial incentives. You will get to be a true strategic partner for your executive.

    If you’re ready to embrace this idea and become a center of influence (or expand your existing influence) you may wonder:

    • How do I develop the kind of trust required?
    • How do I manage all of these things for my executive?
    • How do I get my executive to release control and let me do more?
    • How do I facilitate greater levels of communication?

    These are all valid questions! Thankfully, Joan Burge has the answers. In fact, she’ll be addressing these topics and more in her upcoming live workshop “Building a Star Partnership” in Chicago.

    Kick off Administrative Professionals Week with Joan on Monday, April 24th where you’ll learn her secret success formula for becoming a center of influence. Learn more here >>

    Are you ready to become a center of influence? Do you think you already are? Are there areas you’d like to expand your influence? Please share your thoughts and experiences in the comments below!

    We are also holding a FREE WEBINAR on Building A Star Partnership and you can register here.

     

    The post Building the Partnership with Your Executive: Are You a Center of Influence? appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 14:00:14 on 2017/01/23 Permalink
    Tags: , administrative professional, , , , career advice, , , , , , , , , , , voice your opinion,   

    Tactfully Voicing Your Opinion In The Workplace 

    voicing_your_opinion_at_work

    I hope you had a great week last week and were able to apply the tips I had for communicating with people from different generations. In case you did not read the last two Monday Motivators, I have been writing a 3 part series on communicating for business success. The first one was, Be a better communicator at work and the second was, Bridge the Generational Communication Gap.

    Today I am focusing on tactfully voicing your opinion, which is another topic I cover in our World Class Assistant Certification course.

    Throughout my career as an employee—a few decades ago—I had the need to voice my opinion to my manager, colleague, vendors, peers, and others. As a business owner, leader, trainer, coach…I still have situations occur when I need to voice my opinion. We all experience this in the workplace. For some people, it is easy to voice their opinion and for others, it is hard.

    The caution is just because someone has the courage to speak up, it doesn’t mean they are presenting it in a way that will be acceptable to the receiver. If we want our voice to be heard and to be taken seriously, we have to think about how we communicate and present our case.

    Step #1: Consider these factors. Before you even express your opinion, there are some factors you should take into consideration, such as:

    • What is the other person’s sensitivity to the issue or situation?
    • What is my experience level in the area in which I want to express my views?
    • Is it too late to express my opinion?
    • If the receiver is from a different culture, how will they accept what I have to say?
    • Are there generational differences between me and the person to whom I want to express my views? How might that impact their willingness to be open to what I have to say?
    • My mood? Am I in a low mood? A grumpy mood? Frustrated? That probably is not the time to express my opinion. This could dramatically affect the outcome.
    • Why am I even having this conversation?
    • What is my motive in voicing my opinion? What do I hope to accomplish?

    Step #2: Think about the words you will use. Resist rattling off what’s on your real mind. You want to maintain professionalism and have the receiver be open to your suggestions or views.

    Step #3: Gather facts to back up your opinion. For example, if Joe in another department consistently turns in a monthly report late, you will have a lot more leverage or chance of getting Joe to change if you were to say something like… “Joe, the January report was due on the 18th of the month; I received the report on January 25. In February, the report was due February 14; I received the report February 19.” Do you see having facts is more powerful than saying, “Joe you are always late with the monthly report.”

    Step #4: Make sure you aren’t personally attacking someone. Stay focused on the point or issue at hand or situation. It does us no good to verbally attack a person.

    Step #5: Select the best time. Timing is important. Maybe you wish to express your thoughts in a meeting to one of the attendees but you would be better off waiting until after the meeting or even the next day. Again, if we want people to be open to what we have to offer, we need to consider if this is the right time.

    Step #6: Clearly explain your point of view. Two people can be right and not be in agreement. What do I mean? I see it all the time when I coach executives and assistants. Each person has their view of a situation, expectations or performance. The executive is right and the assistant is right but they have different view or stories about what happened. Take time to explain your thoughts.

    Step #7: Consider your relationship with the other person. How long have you known this person? How will they take your feedback? Are they a superior? (You can still voice your opinion but very carefully.) Do they work within your organization or outside your organization?

    It is both important to express our views and maintain another person’s self-esteem. I encourage you to work on this vital business skill.

    Have an awesome week!

    Joan Burge

    Come see me live in Chicago for Administrative Professionals Week!

    workshop_for_administrative_assistants_chicago_illinois

    Photo Credit: Designed by Katemangostar / Freepik

    The post Tactfully Voicing Your Opinion In The Workplace appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:12:59 on 2017/01/12 Permalink
    Tags: , , administrative conference, administrative professional, , , , , get the most out of your conference, goals for upcoming conference, learning event, learning programs, , overwhelm, , , ,   

    How to Get the Most Out of Your Upcoming Administrative Conference 

    overwhelm

    Next week I’ll be attending a large conference in Las Vegas to further my education. Today, my head is swarming after reading through what seemed like a never-ending website, each page loaded with tons of information. This is a training-industry conference and is one of the big ones. This is the first time I am attending this particular training industry event which is mostly focused on learning technologies. But it’s not that simple. It is a massive arena.

    I wanted to plan which sessions I want to attend. Quite honestly, I feel more confused than ever. On the first day alone, there are 70 sessions to choose from. Yikes, I only have 7 hours at the conference including lunch, exhibit halls and breaks. How am I supposed to choose? The second day of the conference offers 65 sessions. Really? How can any one person make a decision as to which sessions are the best?

    And to top it off, to figure out which sessions I want to attend, I have to click on each session title to learn about the session. Do you realize how time-consuming that is for me? So after almost 2 hours of reading and barely touching the surface, I am somewhat frustrated and my brain is saturated. I’m definitely on overload.

    This experience got me thinking about our own administrative conference we hold each fall and the attendee experience.

    I now understand why administrative and executive assistants have raved about the intimacy of the Office Dynamics Conference for Administrative Excellence. Aside from the less than 500 attendees, past attendees have told us they love that we do not offer concurrent sessions or when we do host concurrent session, we offer only 3 at a time.

    Whether you’re attending a large or small event this year to continue your administrative learning, take these three tips into consideration and make them part of your planning process.

    4 Tips to Get the Most Out of Your Upcoming Administrative Conference:

    1. Have a goal in mind for the learning event. Think about why you are attending this event. Are there specific learning objectives you wish to accomplish? New skills you want to acquire? New technologies you want to learn about and begin to implement?
    2. Take in the information bit-by-bit. If you’re attending a large event, you don’t need to attend everything that is being offered. It’s simply not possible. Allow yourself to soak in the offerings and choose what’s best for you and the goal you selected for yourself (tip 1).
    3. Use the tools offered to get to know attendees before, during and after the program. Follow the event hashtag, use it. Ask questions and introduce yourself to people who are also attending. Networking doesn’t only happen at the live event, it also happens before and after the event, so take advantage of that.
    4. Write your goal(s) for the event down on an “Action Log” for the event. During the event, begin to create your plan of action. What are the obstacles you will face when you return to the office, what are the steps you need to take and in what order? What are the resources you’ll need?

    As I’ve been mapping out my own upcoming conference experience, I am reminded that more is not always better. Thousands of participants do not always make for great networking. In fact, it makes bonding and creating long-lasting relationships even more difficult. Hundreds of concurrent sessions are not always better. So many options often cause stress and frustration. Targeted topics around a key theme increase the chances of behavior change. These are just some of the things that make our administrative conference unique from other administrative conferences.

    I’d like to hear from you. What are the methods you implement for a successful learning experience when attending any administrative conference or training workshop?

    The post How to Get the Most Out of Your Upcoming Administrative Conference appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 17:33:08 on 2016/12/19 Permalink
    Tags: , administrative professional, , holiday message, , ,   

    In Deep Gratitude-Serving the Administrative Profession Since 1990 

    Christmas is just around the corner. I’m sure many of you are scurrying to get your holiday shopping done and attending parties.

    So, I am keeping today’s Monday Motivator short.

    On behalf of the entire team at Office Dynamics International, I want to thank you for contributing to our company’s success and for being a fan! It has been an honor and a privilege to serve all of you, whether we have met you in person, via a webinar or you have purchased one of our books. We greatly appreciate all of your positive feedback. If you have sent us any personal notes this year, thank you for taking the time to write. Your letters and emails of encouragement are appreciated and give us the desire to do more and more for you. And not just more…. But to do a stellar job at everything we do!

    We are wishing you and your families a safe and joyous holiday.

    Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! We will see you in 2017.

    Joan Burge and the Office Dynamics International Team

    workshop_for_administrative_assistants_chicago_illinois

    The post In Deep Gratitude-Serving the Administrative Profession Since 1990 appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 19:58:59 on 2016/12/16 Permalink
    Tags: , , , administrative professional, , anticipation, , , foresight, , opportunity, proactive professional, , , , self-evaluation,   

    12 Days of Christmas Webinar: The Proactive Professional with Chrissy Scivicque 

    In this webinar we get to dig in deep with Chrissy Scivicque about what the skill “proactive” really is. What does it look like, how do you acquire and build this skill and so much more. We hope you take the time to tune in and watch this free webinar replay.

    Watch the Replay: The Proactive Professional with Chrissy Scivicque

    proactive professional

    Webinar Resources

    Download the Handout: handout-skillset

    Download the Chat Archive: Day 12 Chat Archive 12 Days

    Download Your Certificate of Attendance: Certificate-Of-Attendance-The Proactive Professional

     

    In this webinar, we ask Chrissy:

    • What does it really mean to be proactive?
    • Why do you think it’s important for administrative professionals to be proactive?
    • How do you actually develop this skill?
    • What is one thing that Chrissy thinks is most important about the topic of being proactive that assistants need to know?

    Nothing changes, until we change. – Chrissy S.

     

    Special Offers From This Webinar

     

    We extended all of our special offer deals!

     

    Catch Up With This Webinar Series

    1. Get Things Done & Control Your Day
    2. Goal Setting & Branding Yourself for 2017
    3. Question & Answer with administrative expert, Joan Burge
    4. The Accelerated Assistant
    5. Riding the Wave of Change
    6. Live Your BIG Life in 2017
    7. The Organized Admin Book Interview with Julie Perrine
    8. Building a Strong (Star) Partnership with Your Boss
    9. Strategies for Being a World Class Assistant
    10. Must-Have Skills
    11. Mastering Exceptional Self-Leadership
    12. The Proactive Professional with Chrissy Scivicque

    The post 12 Days of Christmas Webinar: The Proactive Professional with Chrissy Scivicque appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
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