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  • feedwordpress 14:30:14 on 2018/04/13 Permalink
    Tags: Admin Assistant Training, , , , , , ,   

    Why Good Writing Skills Are Important In The Workplace 

    Why_Good_Writing_Skills_Are_Important_In_The_Workplace

    Do you ever find yourself asking “Why Good Writing Skills Are Important In The Workplace? Why home in (or is it hone in?) on the technicalities? Who notices? Who cares?

    Those who care about productivity, for one. Studies show that 6% of productivity in corporations is affected by poorly written communications. And that number is probably low. Still, it reflects the time wasted going back and forth, back and forth, to clarify messages that should have been clear, concise, and complete in the first place.

    Who else cares?

    Those who sign your paycheck. If your written missives are riddled with errors, you will likely fall short of getting the results expected and could be (or should be) forced to redo the work. Incorrect grammar, misused words, long-winded sentences—all too commonly found in business writing.

    Who else cares?

    The recipients of your message. Perhaps you expect them to take action on something as straight-forward as “attend this meeting,” but your message fails to convey the when, where, and/or why clearly. They’re not sure what to do; you’ve left them wondering about the meeting itself—and about your competence.

    Being impeccable in your writing is essential to doing your job well. The credibility and reputation you arduously build into your career is undermined when sloppiness gets through.

    As you strive for your best during this Administrative Professionals Month, take to heart the importance of a high level of competence in your written communications. You are judged by it constantly. The effort you make perfecting your grammar and writing skills will pay off in increased influence among those who do care.

    Be impeccable in your writing … always.

    Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping administrative professionals add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource so you can quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through excellent weekly resources in your inbox, including a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks.

    To celebrate Administrative Professionals Month, visit www.wordtrippers.com/odi during the month of April for a $30 discount on Word Trippers Tips.

    Good_Writing_Skills

    The post Why Good Writing Skills Are Important In The Workplace appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 18:28:14 on 2018/03/16 Permalink
    Tags: Admin Assistant Training, , , , , , ,   

    Do You Have A Problem Saying No? 

    problem_saying_no

    What are your tips on the best way an assistant can overcome their problem saying no.

    “I have a real problem saying no at work. How do assert myself when I can’t take on any more?” This is one question I frequently here from administrative and executive assistants. I’m sure you many of you have encountered this, so I’d like your advice.

    “I have a problem saying ‘no’ to anyone. In the past, climbing up to the position I presently hold, it was an asset and it helped me to get noticed and promoted, but now I find it has labeled me as the go-to person. With all the duties I am expected to perform, I just can’t help everyone, yet I find myself doing it anyway. How do I decline without sounding difficult or rude?”

    Assistants all over the world have struggled with how to say ‘no’ at work.

    My question to my readers: How have you handled or would handle a similar situation?

    We encourage you to share in the comments below.

    Are you an assistant who doesn’t have any trouble saying no? What has that experience been like for you?

    Are you an assistant who has a problem saying no at work? Does that spill over outside of work? What are some of the biggest obstacles for you in saying no when you simply can’t or shouldn’t accommodate a person’s request of you?

    Do you simply being the ‘go-to’ person and yes is your favorite word? Let’s hear it! Please share below.

    Need more help in the area of asserting yourself? We’ve got your back. Check out my entire series of blogs and webinars that can help you build your assertiveness in the workplace.

    Do you think that saying no to someone means you are a terrible assistant? Check out our article: Qualities of a Great Assistant (spoiler – Yes Man/Woman isn’t on the list of qualities).

    Related: How Well Do You Communicate? A guest post by Judi Moreo

    Why Being A People-Pleaser Is Bad For Your Health

    The post Do You Have A Problem Saying No? appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:30:36 on 2018/03/02 Permalink
    Tags: Admin Assistant Training, , ,   

    Blatant Pronoun Misuses You Want to Learn and Avoid 

    grammar_misuses

    by Barbara McNichol

    I love watching the TV show “Dancing with the Stars” but even this escape doesn’t give me a break from grammar glitches. In one episode alone, I counted four times when participants and/or hosts misused the pronouns as they spoke.

    As a society, if we repeatedly hear words used incorrectly on national TV (and all around us), how will we ever know what’s right?

    Without attempting to overcome years of grammar neglect, watch out for certain common pronoun misuses so you get a feel for what’s correct—and what’s not.

    “Me and Jack” finished the report. It should be “Jack and I” finished the report.

    Rule: When the subject is more than one, you need a subjective pronoun (I, she, he, we, they, who). (“Subjective” refers to the pronoun’s place in the sentence—as a subject.)

    Clue: Say the sentence without “Jack.” I finished the report. Now it’s easy to tell which pronoun is correct.

    “Bob hired Peggy and I to draft the proposal.” It should be “Peggy and me.”

    Rule: “Peggy and me” is the object of the verb “draft” and therefore requires an objective pronoun (me, her, him, us, them, whom). (“Objective” refers to the pronoun’s place in the sentence—as an object.)

    Clue: Say the sentence without “Peggy and.” Does it sound right to say “Bob hired I to draft the proposal”? You know it doesn’t!

    “Between you and I, we got the job done.” It should be “you and me.”

    Rule: In this sentence, “me” is the object of the preposition “between” and therefore requires an objective pronoun (me, her, him, us, them, whom).

    “Roger, Lloyd, and myself finished the drawings.” It should be “Roger, Lloyd, and I finished the drawings.”

    Rule: You can’t use a “-self” pronoun (myself, yourself, himself, herself, themselves, ourselves) unless it refers to another noun or pronoun used earlier in the sentence.

    Clue: Look for the referring word that precedes the pronoun.

    To receive a one-page chart that shows at a glance which pronouns to use where in a sentence, email me with “Proper Pronouns” in the subject line.

    Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping administrative professionals add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource so you can quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through excellent weekly resources in your inbox, including a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks. Details at www.wordtrippers.com/odi

    The post Blatant Pronoun Misuses You Want to Learn and Avoid appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:30:11 on 2018/02/26 Permalink
    Tags: Admin Assistant Training, , , , , ,   

    Fighting Office Dragons 

    Employee_ConflictI have been speaking about office dragons for years and how to professionally deal with the dragons. Dragons were huge, dominating, fictitious creatures. Medieval writers had vivid imaginations for big, scary things. For many people, work is like a dragon. It can be overwhelming and certainly dominates well over half of our waking hours. Sometimes the people we work with can be pretty “fiery” creatures to deal with, too.

    Please join me on Thursday, March 1, 2018 | 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. PT for my LIVE E-Course, Fighting Office Dragons. Reserve your spot now.

    There are many dragon species at work. Three of the most common perceived species are leaders, co-workers, and self. We are going to look at:

    1. The behaviors of each species that makes them appear to be like a dragon. Notice, I said the word appear.
    2. How to professionally deal with your dragons.

    Leaders can appear to be dragons when they:

    • do not communicate on the employee’s level
    • give poor direction
    • show favoritism
    • do not follow through on what they say
    • do not resolve conflicts

    Co-workers can appear to be dragons when they:

    • gossip
    • convey a bad mood at the office
    • do not perform their part of a job
    • are not a team player
    • do not share necessary information

    You can be a dragon to yourself when you:

    • do not focus on the job
    • let others damage your attitude
    • do not see your own potential
    • lack confidence
    • take criticism personally

    You can do more harm to yourself with negative thinking than any outside dragon. It is your thought process and attitude that controls your internal dragon. You have the power at any time to tame your dragon and put out the fire of any dragon-like qualities.

    Here are 5 strategies you can use with any of the dragons:

    1. Act … Don’t React. Reaction cycles never end. Only when you decide to think and act independently will you progress toward your goal. Reacting is responding to your immediate feeling. It puts you at the mercy of the dragon.
    2. Stop the Mind Reading! Face it, we all move so fast that we seldom take the initiative to clarify things with others. Instead, we ponder a scenario, rolling it over and over in our minds. We “determine” i.e., mind read, what that person was thinking/motivated by/perceiving, without simply asking them to clarify.
    3. Focus on Self-change vs. Changing Others. A good first step is communicating with the dragon. Informing someone and offering suggestions can sometimes be helpful because people don’t always see their negative attitude or behavior. In the final analysis, however, every adult does as he or she chooses. When you can’t change a situation or a person’s behavior, look at changing your view about this person. You can still control your attitude.
    4. Take Independent Steps Toward Your Goals. Determine what your goals are and write them down. List the one thing you can do toward achieving those goals each day. Doing this combines the winning strategies of independent action and self-change. Setting and achieving goals gives you a sense of accomplishment. This is a positive feeling. When you feel good about who you are and what you do, it naturally flows over to others.
    5. Make Friends. You spend more time with co-workers than you do with your family or friends. People at work must become allies instead of dragons. The work relationship requires respect, honesty, confidentiality, appreciation, communication, and energy.
    6. I personally have used all these strategies and know they work. I wish you the best in dragon fighting this week. The most important thing I want you to remember is that most of the time, the dragon is in our mind.

    Joan Burge

    Please join me on Thursday, March 1, 2018 | 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. PT for my LIVE E-Course, Fighting Office Dragons. Reserve your spot now.

    This post is part of Joan’s Monday Motivators, a weekly editorial designed to kick off your week with practical ways to create a new mindset, change behaviors, develop positive relationships and thrive in the workplace with energy, effectiveness, and excellence. Sign up HERE to follow Joan’s Monday Motivators.

    The post Fighting Office Dragons appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 18:44:09 on 2018/02/19 Permalink
    Tags: Admin Assistant Training, , , ,   

    Meetings, Meetings, and More Meetings 

    Meeting_Tips

    I bet that like many people you thought meetings would go by the wayside because of technology or at least there would be fewer meetings. Not true! The reasons meetings
    have increased are due in part to the rise in teams and requisite team meetings and technology such as video-conferencing accommodating slashed travel budgets.

    Approximately 11 million meetings occur in the U.S. each day! Meetings are essential to an organization’s success yet all experts agree that the main reason meetings are such a waste is because no one really prepares for them and that some may be unnecessary.

    I would like to give you some tips as you prepare for meetings this week. Feel free to share these with people in your department or peers.

    • Identify the objective for your meeting. If you do not have a clear objective, then there is no sense holding a meeting.
    • Distribute an agenda to participants before the meeting. Participants should come prepared for their meeting. Without enough notice, participants cannot adequately prepare to be a contributor.
    • Participants should know what is expected of them prior to a meeting. Be as clear as possible with expectations.
    • Often, I hear people are invited to meetings and they do not even need to attend. Limit attendance to only those individuals who truly need to be involved.
    • Set time limits for the meeting and each topic to be covered. When attending meetings, it is easy for people to get off track. This is not necessarily a bad thing and can generate great discussion. On the other hand, the meeting leader wants to ensure everything that is important gets covered in the meeting.
    • Distribute materials in advance. Again, you want participants to be prepared as best they can. Springing something on attendees during the meeting is not good use of time. Give attendees as much of a heads up as possible.

    One phase of meetings that often gets forgotten is the post-meeting stage. So here are some ideas for you.

    • Confirm tasks assigned to attendees and deadline dates.
    • Send thank you notes.
    • Transfer action items to follow-up lists, calendars, and “to-do” folder.
    • Send recap of meeting or minutes.
    • Update your calendar with future meeting dates.
    • Send necessary information to non-attendees or tell alternate’s team leader.
    • Get feedback from attendees.
    • Make note of “personal lessons learned.”

    I hope these ideas are helpful as you go through your week and weeks ahead. If you want to dig deep into meeting planning and execution, I’m hosting a live e-course Tuesday, February 20 at 10:00 am PT.

    Wishing you an amazing week.

    Joan Burge

    The post Meetings, Meetings, and More Meetings appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
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