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  • feedwordpress 16:15:04 on 2018/08/07 Permalink
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    Adapting to Change 

    There can never be too many discussions about change. It’s constant, it’s inevitable, unexpected at times, but it can be extremely rejuvenating. No matter how many times change occurs in life, expected or not, it can seem as if you are not in control. Unexpected change disrupts a routine, but if we reevaluate the current routine and what opportunities the unexpected change offers then we take control. With a positive outlook, adapting to change provides control and allows the opportunity for personal and professional growth.

    A few of the types of change:

    • Career
    • Position or duty changes
    • Health
    • Family or home life
    • Monetary
    • Relocation

    Types of change are as vast as the types of personalities we encounter throughout life. And every single type of change can affect each of us uniquely. There are not any magic words to stop change from happening, but there are ways to adapt and be in control.

    Suggestions for adapting to change:

    • Reach out for support. Talk about the situation and listen to supportive feedback.
    • Evaluate the situation and focus on facts. What opportunities can you explore?
    • Remind yourself of accomplishments, skills you have developed and your unique traits; focus on what you do have control of.
    • Explore all options you have – even ones you may think are unlikely…change can be an opportunity to take chances; a chance to leap and focus on a dream. A friend’s daughter lost her job a few years ago and took that as a sign to go for her dream job; she now happily operates a food truck business!
    • Don’t react quickly, take time to breathe and focus. Get a game plan in place.
    • If your job has changed ask yourself if the change will be a positive or if you need to take control and make your own changes. Maybe it’s time to find a better career match.
    • Grow & learn; read, talk to mentors, attend training or a conference, watch webinars, etc. I suggest constant learning before the unexpected change occurs so you can adapt more easily

    Adapting to professional change shows professionalism and confidence. I can recall my first major professional lesson in adapting to change as if it were yesterday.

    Several years ago, I advanced into one of my very favorite career positions. I worked with an amazing team, flexible hours, great manager, excellent benefits and pay, challenges that provided skills I use to this day, an office with a great view, control of developing procedures and next to one of the best coffee shops! After three years, a new director came in, eliminated a few positions and changed my role. It happened quickly; my office was moved, hours extended, job duties increased, my favorite aspects of my job were taken away and I no longer reported to my great manager.

    I went home that evening and cried…I was devastated. I got caught up in the feeling of thinking I was not in control of the situation. After a pep talk from my husband, a great coworker and from my sister I set up a meeting with the director. I may not have control of his thoughts, but I had control over how I reacted and my confidence. Nothing he could do or say took away all of the hard work I had taken pride in and procedures I had developed (that was part of my personal pep talk).

    I typed up a list of accomplishments (quite proudly so and smiling ear to ear) and confidently carried them with me as I walked into the conference room for our meeting. He would just have to change his mind when he got to know me better and saw my wonderful list. Right?

    He was late…I was not distracted through, I stayed focused. I was armed with facts and not letting his busy schedule & late arrival shake my confidence. As the minutes turned into five-minute increments my palms started to sweat and my mouth got dry. I shook my head… ‘you got this’ I told myself as I looked at that amazing list of accomplishments!

    He did show up…25 minutes late, but I was still prepared and ready. He shook my hand, smiled and apologized for being late…we were off to a good start. I explained how I deserved some of my duties back and proposed suggestions that would allow me to keep those duties & my schedule. I spoke clearly, stayed focused on facts, my palms stopped sweating, I was doing great (patting self on back).

    Then, not even halfway through my speech, he stood up and pointed out the window and yelled THAT BIRD. Yes, bird. My heart raced, my palms started to sweat again, my mouth was so dry. I wasn’t sure how to react. He wasn’t listening, he already made up his mind and it didn’t matter what I said. Finally, as he stood behind me pointing out the window, he explained there had been a bird swooping up and down and down and up (yes, he imitated this action). He kept explaining the swooping action and then excused himself to another meeting, after confirming his decisions were final.

    I sat there alone looking out at the bird. Ah, that free bird, swooping from branch to branch, now he was in complete control. I smiled. I didn’t cry, I didn’t get upset. I focused on the things that I did have control over. I was still the same unique person, I was still a professional. My ‘ex’ manager told me he would write me an excellent letter of recommendation if I decided to move on. My coworkers offered support. The next weekend I started looking for another job, a month later I was working closer to home, the new position offered free tuition, great benefits, flexible hours, and duties I loved.

    A few months later I attended an event at the old job and walked up to the director (the birdman) and thanked him. He smiled and asked why…I explained that his decision created a door of opportunity for me and I was grateful.

    One full-time job and a few temp positions came after that one. That entire career journey led me to my current position and I’m grateful for the amazing opportunities the past several years have offered. Each decision in life, even the ones we don’t feel we have complete control over, lead us to the next step of our lives.

    Adapting to change is an opportunity for growth.

    If you stay true to yourself and confident in your uniqueness, then change is easier to appreciate. Don’t let change take charge and control. You’re in control of you and how you react. It’s OK to be disappointed, cry, be upset, but all of those emotions are temporary and should be treated as such. A change will come; expect it…welcome it…control it.

    If you are going through a change right now, especially professional change, that you don’t quite feel in control of, reach out to mentors, friends, and others. Evaluate your options and remember you are not alone, you are unique, but not alone!

    Change is opportunity…share how you deal with change in the comments below!

     

    dana_buchanan

    Dana Buchanan is a 20 plus year professional assistant with a passion for writing and offers a unique and professional perspective to projects and brainstorming sessions! She enjoys helping others discover key steps toward their career focus, job search, or self-employment exploration by creating or editing resumes, researching a particular type of job search, discovering business ideas and the action needed to succeed and loves sharing interviewing tips! Dana is also available to speak to small groups.

    You can read and follow Dana’s blogs at Success Encourager

     

     

     

    August 14, 2018

    10:00 AM PT – 11:00 AM PT

    Register Here

    The post Adapting to Change appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 14:30:46 on 2018/08/07 Permalink
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    Quick Tip #80: Mix it Up 


    Turn boring talks and presentations into brilliant ones by learning how to mix up the energy along the way!

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:26 on 2018/08/07 Permalink
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    12 Mistakes to Avoid As a First Time Leader 

    Studies show that about half of all new leaders either fail or give up on pursuing a leadership path. New leaders always have a lot to learn, and mistakes—sometimes lots of them—are part of the process. But some mistakes are more costly than others. If you can avoid the worst of them, you can build your credibility and deliver the results that will steer you toward success.

    New leaders don’t have to look green. Avoid these foundational mistakes and people will assume you’re a seasoned and experienced leader.

    1. Letting your emotions get the best of you. When you’re in a position of leadership you can never let your emotions control you. Of course you’re going to experience emotions, and in some circumstances it’s appropriate for those emotions to be visible—but never to the point where you’re no longer in control of the situation.

    2. Compromising on your values. There will always be pressure that comes with leadership. Sometimes compromise is the best way forward, but at other times you’ll be asked to make an outright choice that goes either for or against your values. When that moment comes, remember that the best leaders chose what’s right, not what’s easy.

    3. Dismissing the importance of clear communication. A leader who fails to provide clear guidance is frustrating for everyone within their sphere. When communication is ambiguous, when reports and instructions are unclear, people feel uncertain and hesitant to act. As a leader, its important to understand that people crave guidance and clarity.

    4. Demonstrating bullying behavior. Any leader who thinks bullying will get people to do what they want, is not only a bad leader but doesn’t even have a clue about leadership. Every true leader understands that there’s a direct correlation between how people are treated and how they work. Fear is never a good motivator, but encouragement always works. Bottom line: all bully leaders eventually fail and fall.

    5. Fluctuating priorities. It’s difficult and stressful to work for a leader who is constantly changing their mind, or shifting their view of what’s important. as a leader, you need to realize that your inconsistency will cause turmoil. therefore, as a leader you must decide what is important and keep it a priority.

    6. Lacking accessibility. Leaders need to be present and available. The more you’re in touch with your people, the more you’ll know what’s going on and the more people will trust you with what’s happening. Everyone occasionally needs a minute or for a question or report or to brag about a success. Accessibility improves not only morale but also productivity, because you’re there to provide answers and keep things moving.

    7. Reprimanding people in public. This is a principle that is worth repeating and repeating again: if you have to reprimand someone or even discuss a mistake, do it in private. When people lose dignity, you lose respect.

    8. Talking dishonesty. It’s a simple truth that honesty breeds trust and dishonesty erodes it. When you tell the truth, you never have to keep your story straight. Lying may save you some trouble in the short run, but nothing is worth your integrity.

    9. Displaying favoritism. It’s appropriate to praise top performers, but remember to spread positive attention as much as you can, especially in public. Favoritism, or even the appearance of it, will cause unhappiness, kill productivity, and cost you in respect. Nobody likes being overlooked.

    10. Acting as though you’re the smartest in the room. Even if you are—and it’s never a safe assumption—never act like it. Don’t make pronouncements, but ask questions and listen. Listen to learn, listen to understand, listen to empower others to speak their mind.

    11. Making promises you cannot keep. Those you lead take you at your word. What may seem like a minor promise to you may be much more important to them. Your responsibility is to be accountable to your promises and make them happen. You can’t lead if you don’t keep your word.

    12. Saying “my way or the highway.” If you aspire to being thought of as a leader who’s  domineering, dictatorial, and close-minded, this kind of attitude will get you there quickly. It shuts people up and shuts them down. If you want to be a successful and respected leader, make it a point to consider the opinions of others and be willing to adjust your decisions if better ideas come along.

    Lead from within: We all make mistakes, but some mistakes have a higher price tag than others. Especially when you’re just starting out, set a good tone and make sure you stay far away from avoidable major mistakes.

     


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    Photo Credit: iStock Photo

    The post 12 Mistakes to Avoid As a First Time Leader appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 18:36:56 on 2018/08/02 Permalink
    Tags: CalmTech, Ethics   

    Is Technology making us Calm — or causing us Anxiety? 

    Is the technology in your life making you Calm? Or increasing your Anxiety?

    When you look around at all the beeping and blinking apps and devices, most of the technology in our lives is trying to get and hold our attention. Even media websites and social networks are trying to get your eyeballs for ad-based monetization, even at the detriment of emotionally hooking us as we fight over politics or coo over kitty videos.

    To best illustrate the dichotomy, here’s a slide from a research project on “Modern Wellness” I’m working on with colleague Jessica Groopman for a client who’s building out new technology and wants to be on the right side of history. It’s based off key points that Amber Case presented at a keynote she delivered at Anxiety Tech in SF, and she blessed I could share it here.

    Much of the concern of Anxiety tech is that the tech companies are often operating on an “attention economy” model. Free software or content, in exchange for advertisers who pay to reach you. As a result your data is sold for attention. When people are the product — they are treated like commodities.

    I surveyed a number of tech folks, and found that they have the highest trust with Apple and Google. They trust Apple as they pay a hefty price to use their hardware and software, and there’s been no history of Apple betraying users data. I’ve heard similar responses to Google, despite much of their business model being attention economy (search ads are 70% of the revenue).

    In order to rethink this business model, one idea would be to offer premium based social networks and media networks — but savvy thinkers realize this would create an elite internet separate from the less fortunate, further perpetuating societal issues.

    Solutions. What are the business-level solutions (beyond limiting notifcations from devices and apps?), I see three scenarios:

    • Some had suggested government provided social networks. Unsure this makes sense, as some government media doesn’t end up being on the side of the people.
    • A mixture of business models that enable companies like Facebook to also generate revenues from other product offerings like devices, ecommerce sales, and beyond.
    • Coop owned technology companies where the users own the equity (see Juno in NY) perhaps blockchain based companies that offer to their users, as a form of reward and loyalty.

    Love to hear your thoughts of other solutions, this will shape society as we know it.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:28:55 on 2018/08/02 Permalink
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    Creating A Friendly Work Atmosphere 

    Create a Friendly and Approachable Atmosphere

    In our fast-paced world, people are becoming detached and desensitized. We are more transaction-based, unfocused on how our interaction is affecting other people. When you have that style of interaction with others, the world becomes decidedly colder. You must be aware of when that happens and take the steps necessary to turn it around:

    • Your body language and facial expressions provide visual clues, whether you intend them to or not. You need to be aware of messages you might be sending that you don’t want to send. You should not assume you are communicating what you think you are! You must be open to inventorying your communication style and be aware of cultural diversities that could work for, or against, you.
    • It is important to be genuinely interested when a person is communicating with you. Stopping, listening, and asking questions demonstrates your interest.
    • Assess what kind of environment you work in. Do you post a warning sign that states, “Stop. I am in a bad mood,” when you are having a rough day? Some assistants will say that is exactly the message they want to send. However, even when you are in a bad mood, which is very possible, you want to be very cautious of the message you send to peers or your manager. Sending this message is not conducive to controlling your attitude or choosing what attitude to wear each day.
    • What kinds of things do you surround yourself with that make you look unapproachable? (Your job is to support people whether you want to be bothered or not.)

    Come In with Zeal, Leave with Zen

    You go to work with zeal, having a mindset that you will conquer the day. Then you get into the office and find it is like a zoo.

    You want to leave with Zen, so you approach work by being excited about what you are doing. You approach your work with a good attitude, no matter what happens!

    You find that your work improves, and as that happens, you feel good about what you are accomplishing and how the work is moving forward.

    You are now adding value every day, and it isn’t dependent upon everything at work being perfect. You are managing your attitude (in spite of the zoo!) and so, when it’s time to go, you leave with a Zen-like peacefulness, knowing you cannot be moved by what’s happening around you.

    You form your own emotional “environment,” and in so doing, you work better and have more peacefulness. That’s how you come in with zeal and leave with Zen.

     

    This excerpt is from the book, Who Took My Pen…Again? by Joan Burge. This is available for purchase at the Office Dynamics Success Store.

    The post Creating A Friendly Work Atmosphere appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
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