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  • feedwordpress 14:45:50 on 2019/05/09 Permalink
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    If I Were (Was?) Rich… 


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    writing_skills_for_administrative_assistants

    The play Fiddler on the Roof recently came through my city, and my friend kept singing her dad’s favorite song from that hit: “If I Were a Rich Man.”

    My comment? “I’m glad the lyricist got the grammar right!”

    Why is the use of “were” (not “was”) correct in this song title and similar phrases? Consider the conditional meaning associated with using an “if” clause. In this case, the lyrics “if I were a rich man” reflect a wishful condition, not a true statement.

    You may recall how Tevye, the character who sang this song, lamented his lowly position as a milkman and wondered what wealth would bring to his life. If at one time he had been rich, he could factually say, “When I was a rich man.” But in this context, he could only hope to be rich.

    What about the song “If I Were a Carpenter”? Here, the lyricist correctly uses “were” to depict a hope or dream, not a current fact.  

    When “Was” is Correct

    So when would you use “was” (not “were”) in an “if” clause? When it introduces an indirect question or statement of fact. Examples:

    • The boss asked if I was (not “were”) finished with the report. This factual statement is based on what’s true or possible, not something hypothetical.
    • If he was (not “were”) guilty, he would have remained silent. This states a fact that’s likely true, not something conditional.

    In the statements you make, remember to use “were” when the situation calls for being conditional, hypothetical, or wishful. And like Tevye, it’s how you can make a plea for the wealth you wish for!

    Want more tips like this to hone your writing skills and advance your career? You’ll find 18 Days to Become a Better Writer an easy-to-use e-guide. Start today by clicking here.

    writing_tips

    Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping administrative professionals add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource to quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through excellent weekly resources in your inbox, including a webinar, crossword puzzles, and a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks. Enjoy a $30 discount at checkout with the code ODI at www.wordtrippers.com/odi.

    The post If I Were (Was?) Rich… appeared first on Office Dynamics - Executive And Administrative Assistant Training.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:07 on 2019/05/09 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Sucession Planning,   

    How to Start Planning for Your Succession 


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    Business leaders always ask me, when is a good time to start planning their succession, and I usually answer the day you become the leader. And many of them are shocked, but the truth is, succession planning takes time and development; and if you want to grow leaders you have to groom and grow them, it doesn’t happen overnight.

    So if you are wondering how to start planning for your succession, this is how.

    Start early: It can take time to find and prepare a promising candidate for a leadership role. So, don’t leave your succession plan until the last moment, start having a plan from the day you take office, because how you will lead every day, will affect those around you, No one is going to be with a company forever, so it’s important to know what needs to happen and it’s the leadership responsibility in developing bench strength that a critical for succession to be successful

    Engage senior leaders: It’s essential to have consensus among the CEO and senior leadership team about the importance of proactive leadership development and succession planning. This group should set expectations, put processes in place, and hold the organization accountable for making it happen.

    Speak to the process: As the current leader, it’s important to be part of the process and procedure, think outside the box when you are building a succession plan, and make sure you have a slate of diverse candidates. A robust plan can ease the process of identifying individuals who are ready to take on the role immediately—and others who are a few years out.

    Map out a vision of the future leadership team:  An active development process to prepare people for next-level jobs. so it imperative for leadership to understand the capabilities required to achieve the organization’s strategy. With this understanding, the organization can assess the potential of current people, and see if there are any candidates to become the future leader to meet the emerging needs.

    Shift everyone’s mindset: Usually everyone thinks of succession as a loss, it is the leaders responsibility to embrace the idea and have everyone shift their mindset from seeing the succession process as a loss and toward envisioning it as an opportunity for the themselves and the company.

    Develop the future leaders. Identify potential future leaders, then identify their development needs and build in systematic processes to cultivate that development growth. As a leader, you need to identify developmental needs and career aspirations, and consciously build learning objectives into the future leader’s work.

    Seek new talent to fill the void. There will be many instances where future leadership capabilities cannot be fulfilled by those who are in company now, that is when the organization needs to an effective hiring and ongoing on-boarding practices to integrate new leaders into the company.

    By knowing the importance of succession planning and identifying your potential future leaders you help those in your company feel valued for their contributions and eager to realize their potential within the organization.

    Lead from within: The potential gains from doing succession planning well go far beyond the obvious result of having a steady pipeline of leaders ready to step into new roles, it gives the company stability and resilience, which breeds market confidence and drives shareholder value.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

     

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Start Planning for Your Succession appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 17:45:30 on 2019/05/07 Permalink
    Tags: , ,   

    What is the Difference Between an Administrative Conference and Administrative Training? 


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    With the plethora of offerings for administrative training and development, there is also a lot of confusion. People are throwing around terminology that can be confusing to the purchaser. I’d like to help you understand better so you can stop asking yourself “what is the difference between an administrative conference and administrative training?”

    Something to remember is that typically if you want to dig deep into administrative training content and practice the skills you are learning, you usually get that in a training course or workshop. The smaller the class, the more attention you get from the trainer thus leading to longer-term behavior change. When choosing an administrative conference or training, choose wisely. I will write about this in another blog.

    Administrative ConferenceAdministrative Training
    Delivered live with audience in the same room (may be streamed or recordedDelivered live with an audience in the room (could be virtual)
    All types of interaction with audience is possibleAll types of interaction with the audience are possible
    Can have direct contact with presenters BUT not all of them because of too many participants or speakers don’t stay for entire eventDefinitely, have direct contact with facilitators because often the class size is small compared to a conference
    Mid-level facilitationHigh-level facilitation by the presenter (Important the presenter is highly experienced to create behavior change)
    Networking with 100 – 2,000Networking with a small intimate group
    Teambuilding – depends on the conference host if they conduct any activities for this (Office Dynamics always conducts an educational, fun team building activity the first day of our event)Team building – the extent of opportunity to do this is up to the facilitator
    Speakers – several speakers presentUsually, 1 or 2 facilitators present and facilitate
    # of Attendees 100 – 2,000+True training classes are usually limited to 25 so the facilitator can give adequate attention to students.
    Skill practice – someSkill practice – ample time to practice newly-learned skills. (With Office Dynamics administrative training classes, participants have lots of time to practice in the classroom. Our training is roll up your sleeves and drill down!)
    Social – most conferences purposely set time for social and extracurricular activitiesMight include a welcome reception or dinner
    General Sessions and Concurrent SessionsUsually, everyone is in one place/room. Might have some small break out groups or rooms
    Usually higher end cost, but not alwaysCould be a higher end; normally affordable
    Held in various cities and countriesHeld in various cities and countries
    Usually comprehensive materialsParticipants SHOULD receive comprehensive materials
    Exhibitors – usually, not allUsually no exhibitors

    I hope this information helps you pursue your goals!

    The post What is the Difference Between an Administrative Conference and Administrative Training? appeared first on Office Dynamics - Executive And Administrative Assistant Training.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:58 on 2019/05/07 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Successful Leadership,   

    10 Important Ways to Describe a Successful Leader 


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    In my work as a leadership coach to top business leaders around the world, I see firsthand the growing influence of the field. These days, it seems, there are countless conversations, articles and blog posts about leadership. As awareness of the field grows, people are looking to define it, explain it and emulate it.

    I find it fascinating that people want more understanding of leadership processes than the person behind the leadership—for people it’s always more about the how and less about the who. And for me, the who is more important before you can implement the how.

    To address that need, here are 10 important ways to define successful leadership. Once you understand these elements, you’ll have the orientation you need to handle any process or theory:

    A successful leader is an authentic leader. They are genuine; they are confident in who they are while remaining teachable. You’ll never hear them say they’re faking it till they make it. You can feel the confidence they have in their unique self.

    A successful leader is a cognizant leader. They are mindful and aware, attentive to themselves and to those around them. They know how to apply knowledge and perception to their work.

    A successful leader is an optimistic leader. They’re always able to view the glass as half full instead of half empty. Their sunny perspective means everything they do is encouraging and empowering.

    A successful leader is a devoted leader. They are dependable and hold themselves accountable for their actions. You can count on them to be consistent and to stick it out until the job gets done.

    A successful leader is a respected leader. A leader who fosters respect is a leader worth following—they are willing to give their all for the people they’re leading and the cause they’re working for.

    A successful leader is a virtuous leader. Their integrity, honesty and character are reflected in everything they do. Their inner moral compass guides every thought and action.

    A successful leader is a purposeful leader. The best and most successful leaders are those who are driven by their mission. They keep it centered as the most important thing to them, and that awareness keeps them on track.

    A successful leader is a truthful leader. Their word is their bond. and the only way they know how to function is with honesty and honor. 

    A successful leader is a courageous leader. They are bold in their thinking and determined in their actions, able to take risks in business and think creatively about the future. Uncharted territory is never off limits.

    A successful leader is a humble leader. Self-effacing and appreciative, they recognize they can’t do it alone—and they’d never want to. They are thankful in knowing the value of their team and genuinely grateful for the contributions of the people they lead. Their leadership is centered on their recognition that success is shared.

    In my opinion a successful leader should embody all of these important ways to be a leader. The degree to which you miss the mark in any of them is the degree to which your leadership can be compromised.

    Lead from within: The best, most successful leader is one who doesn’t need anything from their people but serves in meaningful ways that become their blueprint for success.

     


     

    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

     

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 10 Important Ways to Describe a Successful Leader appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 18:08:16 on 2019/05/02 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , ,   

    How Do I Tactfully Voice My Concern? – Ask an Admin 


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    Executive Assistants and Administrative Assistants have to deal with a lot. Whether that is working remotely, working with several managers or executives, and sometimes supporting an entire floor of employees! Usually, these difficult situations bring up situations that leave them asking, “how do I tactfully voice my concern?”

    Heather D. asks us:

    I am a Certified Executive Administrative Professional and have been an Executive Assistant (EA) for the last 15 years to a VP of my former employer where we had a very good Business Partner relationship. I have since been forced to leave that employer almost 2 years ago now due to downsizing and am in a different EA role with a quickly growing company reporting to both the CEO and CFO.

    The role posted was framed up that I would be supporting them in the day to day activities much like an EA role does however since the day I was hired I have simply been a  “taskmaster/office manager” doing miscellaneous office/employee relations type tasks with very little interaction with either the CEO or CFO including my mid-year and end of the year evaluations. Both senior leaders have grown with the company for the last 28+ years and have never had what we know to be a true EA and aren’t interested in my role evolving to that at all. They did, however, hire a VP of Sales this past July that I was told I would be supporting as well and that he is being groomed to replace the CEO within the next 1-2  yrs. As part of this VP’s onboarding, I got to know him well and he had a true EA in the last 15 years with his former employer and would like to have one here.

    The CEO, CFO and this new VP of Sales all agreed that most of my time should be supporting him and that the VP of Sales was given the go-ahead to rewrite my job description however I don’t report to him or sit near him and both of those are necessary, in my opinion, to do this EA role the most efficiently and effectively (not to mention an accurate job description). The problem is that this company is moving and growing so quickly with “multiple hot irons in the fire” all the time that neither the CEO or the VP of Sales has had any time to see this transition through and it has been about 2 months since they last told me this transition was happening.

    My question is should I be approaching my direct leader (who I have no interaction with), the CEO or the new VP of Sales (which is who I have been working 50-75% of the time for in the last 6 months)? How do I approach this respectfully and voice my concerns in a firm manner around the current reporting/relationship structure?

    Well that is actually a very tough question! How do you tactfully voice your concern as an administrative professional without causing trouble?


    Want to learn more about Ask an Admin and how to submit your own question? Click here

    The post How Do I Tactfully Voice My Concern? – Ask an Admin appeared first on Office Dynamics - Executive And Administrative Assistant Training.

     
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