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  • feedwordpress 13:00:04 on 2019/08/14 Permalink
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    Emotional Intelligence for Administrative Assistants 


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    I have grown to love speaking on and teaching assistants about emotional intelligence. This definitely is a skill every assistant needs to know. This is a skill you can use every single day!

    In our World Class Assistant course, we cover this topic and participants work on real work world case studies. They are scenarios that assistants can relate to. I reference Daniel Goleman for my classes and want to share this with you. Please quickly evaluate your level of emotional intelligence in each of the four dimensions.

    Daniel Goleman, author of Working with Emotional Intelligence says, “Emotional intelligence is the ability to sense, understand, and effectively apply the power and acumen of emotions as a source of human energy, information, connection, and influence.

    Daniel also says:

    False:

    • The common view is that emotions are things that happen to us.
    • Emotions don’t belong in business.

    True:

    • Emotions are an inner source of energy, influence, and information.
    • They are inherently neither good nor bad. It is what we do with emotions that make the difference.

    The 4 Dimensions:

    #1:    Self-Awareness (I know me.)

    • Recognize how your feelings affect your performance.
    • You are open to candid feedback.

    #2:    Self-Management (I manage me.)

    • Self-control.
    • Admit mistakes.

    #3:    Social Awareness (I try to know you.0

    • Pay attention to emotional cues.
    • Adapt communication style to compliment others.

    #4:    Relationship Management (I attempt to facilitate situations for a positive outcome.0

    • Step forward as needed, regardless of your position.
    • Model the change you expect from others.

    One of our top trainers, Julie Reed, has been teaching several of our World Class Assistant™ certification/designation courses. When I asked Julie, what were her favorite lessons from emotional intelligence, she shared the following:

    • I manage me. I am in charge of my attitude.
    • I choose to not react.
    • I am resilient; I practice positive self-esteem, and I chose to ignore the haters.
    • I am confident in my skills and aware of my weaknesses.
    • I stay true to my North Star.
    • I manage me – I hold myself accountable and, I mitigate risks to my reputation and build my credibility equity. This, in turn, has gotten me invited to the table, as an active participant, confidant, and leader.

    Which dimensions of emotional intelligence do you need to work on? Why not start today?

    Joan Burge

    training_for_executive_assistants

    What it means to be a World Class Assistant™:

    • You’re a career-minded administrative professional looking to build powerful partnerships with your executive(s) and organization.
    • You’re a power player who wants to reap more rewards from your efforts – and you’re not afraid to do what it takes to get there.
    • You’re committed to the administrative profession as well as your career growth and you’re eager to demonstrate this.
    • You’re a high-performing individual who wants to succeed both in your professional and personal life.
    • You’re ready to have the kind of breakthrough experience that takes you off the sidelines and puts you right in the middle of the game.

    What are you waiting for?

    The post Emotional Intelligence for Administrative Assistants appeared first on Office Dynamics - Executive And Administrative Assistant Training.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:40:12 on 2019/08/13 Permalink
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    Do You Have an Internal Admin Site or Hold Lunch N Learns Where You Work? 


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    tips_for_administrative_assistants

    Ask an Admin was created by Office Dynamics to help administrative professionals with their problems through the help of their peers. We don’t always have an answer to each individuals problem but we know some of you might. Please read the question and comment below.

    Admin on SF Peninsula asks:

    Looking forward to your replies!

    Do you have an internal admin site where you work? Or maybe you’re thinking of creating one?

    I co-designed one at my company and am interested in collaborating with you.

    An internal admin site is the main company site with all the links that admins find useful for their jobs centralized in one place.

    Additionally, I am considering starting a monthly Admin Lunch N Learn at my place of work. My current vision would be to rotate topics and have a combination of speakers coming in. Topics related to the administrative profession would be discussed. Admins and outside speakers would have the opportunity to share their skills, experience, knowledge, etc.

    If you have been a part of, or have attended anything such as these, I would like to connect with you to discuss.

    I’m looking forward to your responses!

    Admin on SF Peninsula

    The post Do You Have an Internal Admin Site or Hold Lunch N Learns Where You Work? appeared first on Office Dynamics - Executive And Administrative Assistant Training.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:53 on 2019/08/13 Permalink
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    How to Build a Team That Resolves Conflict Effectively 


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    Many leaders make the mistake of thinking they have to resolve every conflict—especially those that affect their team. But the best leaders know that is not the case, they learn to empower their employees by guiding them, giving them the resources they need and incentivizing them to work things out on their own.

    Here are six simple techniques to foster healthy conflict resolution within your office:

    Lead by example. It’s one thing to tell your team what they need to do, and another to hold yourself accountable for your own actions. However you’re personally dealing with conflict, those who report to you will likely follow your lead. To set a good example, pay attention to each person’s perspective, practice good listening skills, accept constructive feedback, and try to create an inclusive environment where differences are respected and honored.

    Coach your team. Every team has conflict—that’s just the norm—but it’s the leader who can coach their team through times of conflict who makes the biggest difference. The best leaders give their employees tools and techniques for mediation and conflict resolution.

    Establish ground rules. Every team needs to know the standards under which they will operate and collaborate. When you equip people with clear expectations and processes, they always know how to respond appropriately.

    Give regular feedback. An annual performance review isn’t nearly enough to prevent and resolve conflict. It is far more effective to have regular feedback sessions with your immediate team. These meetings can help cultivate an atmosphere of open and honest communication, and they present a good opportunity to deal with any misunderstandings or divisive issues before they get out of hand.

    Incentivize your employees. The best way to instill a new practice and keep it going is to provide incentives. They can take many forms—coaching, training, feedback, evaluations, or reward systems. Every leader needs to look at their team and organization and decide what works best for their culture.

    Celebrate successes. When team members successfully resolve internal conflicts, it should be celebrated and acknowledged. An appreciation of successful resolution will help build morale and encourage people to continue following core values and meeting high standards.

    Building a strong effective team that takes conflict in stride starts with leading by example and builds with good coaching, guidance and support.

    Lead from within: Conflict is inevitable. It is leading by example and coaching your team that you can best help them learn to resolve conflicts effectively and efficiently.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Build a Team That Resolves Conflict Effectively appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:34 on 2019/08/08 Permalink
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    5 Ways Smart People Sabotage Their Success 


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    Most of us believe that smart people are automatically successful, but that’s not always the case. Intelligent people may have an advantage out of the gate, but a surprising number end up sabotaging their own success. Here are five of the top reasons why:

    They think they know it all. When people genuinely believe they know everything they need to know, there’s no reason for them to work to develop, grow or evolve. It’s easy for them to become stuck in their ways, and over time they grow rusty and fall behind on new developments in their field.

    They feel entitled. Those who think they deserve special privileges and treatment often already have a significant advantage—whether it’s intelligence, wealth or social status. Entitled people tend to sit back and wait for success to come to them instead of putting in the hard work it takes to get there.

    They aren’t willing to take risks. Sometimes smart people rely on their intelligence and avoid risk at all costs—and as a result they miss out on a lot of great opportunities. Big rewards often require big risks, and those who aren’t willing to roll the dice have a much harder time moving past the middle of the pack.

    They overthink. The smarter you are, the more likely you are to overprepare and overanalyze. Of course it’s good to be thoughtful, but overthinking doesn’t just create a problem—it creates a problem were there wasn’t one before. There’s no bigger enemy to opportunity than the paralysis brought about by overthinking. It’s a surefire way for smart people to sabotage their own success.

    They lack emotional intelligence. People with high intelligence sometimes see other skills as less important. They rely on their IQ instead of working on their EQ, and they’re often painfully unaware of what’s happening around them and how their demeanor may be affecting the situation. People who grasp concepts quickly and demand high standards are especially prone to creating difficulties when they interact with others. Sometimes smart people rely so much on their intelligence that they miss out on the nuances of a situation where they could have been successful.

    Intelligence is a great gift. But at times it seduces smart people into thinking they’re destined to succeed when that’s not the reality. No matter how smart you are or what other gifts you’re blessed with, make sure you stay connected to reality and work to maintain balance in your attitudes and approach to leadership and work—and life.

    Lead from within: Smart people sabotage their own success all the time without even being aware they are doing it.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post 5 Ways Smart People Sabotage Their Success appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 15:00:55 on 2019/08/07 Permalink
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    The Assistant as a “Center of Influence” 


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    I created the above visual as an image of the ideal situation between an executive and their assistant, especially when it comes to communication. Because of all the technology today, assistants have a very hard time staying “in the loop.” When an assistant is aware of what is going on or what is on the horizon, she or he can better anticipate, be proactive, plan better, foresee barriers, look more professional, and reduce stress. I know this from being an executive assistant for 20 years before starting Office Dynamics.

    Some executives resist this concept for a few common reasons. Executives are independent. They certainly can manage many of these items on their own, but should they? Is that where their attention rightly belongs? In some cases, they add confusion and overlap by being involved in things their assistants should be managing. They can even create embarrassment when it becomes clear to others that they aren’t on the same page.

    By allowing everything to flow through you, your executive can use you as a buffer or filter—a conduit for collecting information, processing it, and sending it back out in the appropriate fashion. It frees your executive to focus attention where it is needed. It allows you, the assistant, to truly be involved in all aspects of your executive’s business, giving you a more holistic point-of-view. Over time, you develop the ability to anticipate needs and truly act as an “alter ego” for your executive.

    Being the Center of Influence requires a deep level of continual communication from and to both parties. Your executive must freely and promptly share information. You must clearly and accurately do the same.

    This concept creates deep interdependence between the two parties.

    One of our VIP trainers, Julie Reed, for our World Class Assistant™ designation and certification course adds:

    • Do you have the right tools and are you using them effectively?  (i.e., email, calendar, phone lines on your desk)
    • Develop a healthy curiosity.  Make time to investigate. If your executive is not bringing you into the conversation, then insert yourself. Do not be afraid to ask questions.
    • Have an active mind – be observant, alert and engaged.

    I highly encourage you to discuss this visual with your executive. At first, they might be resistant so ask them to try disseminating information to you for three weeks and see what happens. If you can get your executive to stay with this process for three weeks, I believe you both will see the benefit.

    training_for_executive_assistants

    Never settle for less in your career.  Set yourself apart with a World Class Assistant™ designation and certification. Register now for our next World Class Assistant™ course to propel your career, expand your network, and become a strategic business partner at your organization!

    The post The Assistant as a “Center of Influence” appeared first on Office Dynamics - Executive And Administrative Assistant Training.

     
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