Updates from October, 2017 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • feedwordpress 17:38:01 on 2017/10/06 Permalink
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    How to Improve Your Presentation Skills 

    How_to_Improve_Your_Presentation_SkillsAs you climb the corporate ladder, delivering a business presentation becomes one of the most important skills that you need to learn. A business presentation has to be informative, engaging, influencing, and entertaining at the same time. If one of these four key objectives are not covered well, the effectiveness of the presentation falls down immediately.
    It is a well-established fact that planning and preparation are the two steps that cannot be compromised, and are often not overlooked but most newbie presenters fail at the delivery step. Having a dull opening with a nervous demeanor might throw your audience into an irrecoverable state of disinterest. Showing that you are passionate about the topic and delivering the presentation with full-confidence is quite important.
    Usage of visuals can help expand horizons of your presentation for far better outcomes. If you open your presentation with a jaw-dropping statistics, the chances for your audience to pay attention to the rest of content go up, drastically. The audience tends to remember these figures for a long time and your views also find better acceptance.
    Check out this infographic from Malcolm Andrews to learn how to deliver a presentation effectively and improve your presentation skills. Also, check out various things that you should adopt on and also many others that you need to avoid while delivering a presentation.
    How_to_Deliver_a_World_Class_Presentation

    The post How to Improve Your Presentation Skills appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 17:05:33 on 2017/09/29 Permalink
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    When “Start to” and “Decide to” Creep into Your Writing 

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    by Barbara McNichol

    Do you have a habit of starting a sentence with the word “start” or “begin”? In a 5,000-word document I recently edited, those two words appeared 14 times, while only five were deemed necessary to the meaning. That’s a lot of extra words!

    To be more direct in your writing, skip the “start/begin” part and employ the phrase Nike made famous: Just do it!

    These examples show how you can write a stronger statement by going straight to the action verb rather than “beginning” to go for it.

    Example 1: Slowly begin to approach your teammate with your idea.

    Better: Slowly approach your teammate with your idea.

    Example 2: Start to make an agenda for the meeting.

    Better: Make an agenda for the meeting.

    Whenever you write “start to” or “begin to,” question it. Ask: Is “start” or “begin” essential to the meaning of the sentence? Chances are you can glide straight to the action verb without it!

    Similarly, watch out for “decide to” in your writing. Which verb carries more weight in this example sentence, “decide” or “launch”?

    Example: The president decided to launch the company’s implementation strategy next month.

    Better: The president will launch the company’s implementation strategy next month.

    Do you see how “decide” doesn’t add meaning while “launch” is vital to the message? When you catch yourself writing “decide,” ask: Is it needed?

    Make crisp, clear messages your goal with everything you write.

    Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping administration professionals add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource so you can quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through excellent weekly resources in your inbox, including a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks. Details at www.wordtrippers.com/odi

    The post When “Start to” and “Decide to” Creep into Your Writing appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 15:51:34 on 2017/09/28 Permalink
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    Make Educated Decisions When Choosing an Administrative Conference (Part 1 of 6) 

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    Since there are so many administrative conferences being offered, I would like to walk you through a series of blogs on how to select the conference that is right for you, gain approval and how to get the most for your investment.

    I am keeping these blogs to the point.

    A conference should feed your brain and soul!

    1. Start with the end in mind. What is your goal or goals for going to a conference?
    • Education wise? What skills do you need to grow? What new skills do you need to learn/develop? The problem with this is sometimes we don’t know what we need to develop. It’s called our blind spot.
    • To network and meet new people?
    • Learn best practices from peers?
    • Learn best practices from subject matter experts?
    • What is the value of the program? In other words, what are you getting for your money? Any extra events such as a welcome dinner?
    1. Inquire about the quality of the workshop materials? Will you be able to use them as a reference guide after the training? Do they provide robust information?
    1. Do your research. Make a comparison spreadsheet, if necessary
    • Topics to be covered – do they align with your goals?
    • Speakers
    • The flow of the agenda – is there time for networking? Hallway conversations?
    • Location/Dates
    • # of attendees (you may not always see this number listed on the conference website)
    • The pros and cons of large vs. intimate conferences.
    • WHO is hosting the conference? Are they on a mission to help assistants?
    1. Identify your learning style (and why that’s important)
    • High energy or slower pace?
    • Hands-on; experiential or sit and listen
    • Talked to or involved and be able to do activities with other attendees when a speaker is presenting
    1. What kinds of people do you relate to or want to be around? (This is very important. Who attends is just as important as the speakers.)
    • Low-key vs. high energy
    • Who are a step or 2 ahead of you or just like you
    • Passionate about the profession or it’s just a job
    • Committed to making personal change or someone who just wants to be out of the office and learn some basic stuff
    • Do you want to be surrounded by people who will make you better? Or agree with you all the time?
    • Do you want to be around sharp, professional speakers and attendees or ho-hum people?

    Be sure to look for the rest of this 6-part Series.

    Joan Burge

    conference_for_administrative_assistants

    The post Make Educated Decisions When Choosing an Administrative Conference (Part 1 of 6) appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 06:35:29 on 2017/09/25 Permalink
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    Quick Tip #70: How to Interrupt Politely 

    How do you interrupt a conversation when it seems no one wants to hear what you have to say? This video will show you how to cut someone off politely.

     

     

     
  • feedwordpress 22:40:41 on 2017/09/19 Permalink
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    Customer Service Reps Don’t Always Deserve a Bad Rap 

    I think people who make service calls get a bad rap. Some, more than others. Yet, if you really stop to think about it, I bet you’d be hard pressed to count the bad ones on one hand. That includes Xfinity, everyone’s favorite whipping company.

    Just this week, we had numerous service repair people to our home. The dryer was replaced. The air conditioner needed a tune up. A couple of people came out to give us an estimate on a water heater and Xfinity was in the neighborhood checking out an issue. They couldn’t have been nicer or more professional.

    Yet, according to a recent survey by Health magazine, customer service rep jobs are among the most stressful in America, on par with 911 operators. How can that be?

    I would think there are two factors. There is the rep you talk to by phone and the one that shows up at your door. On the phone, it’s easier to be a jerk. After being switched to various departments, being asked to repeat and re-enter the same information multiple times, being put on hold only to be disconnected, then having to call back and start the process all over again, angry frustrated customers can’t help but lose their call. Furthermore, it’s easier to blast someone you can’t see or interact with.

    In person, most of us are a bit more polite to the smiling visitor with an outstretched hand that you invite into your home. We can show these people what the problem is and we watch them, sometimes for hours, working hard to make things right for us again. Furthermore, phone representatives are taught to put up with our rude condescending behavior. If we resort to cursing them out, the worst that will happen is they’ll hang up. When we threaten someone face-to-face, we may risk a physical confrontation.

    Personally, I would not want the stress of being a customer service representative. Most, whether by phone or in person are genuinely trying to help you. Like any other profession, some are better than others. In today’s highly competitive environment, these people are getting squeezed from multiple sides. Managers are pushing them to take more calls, cut call times and sell more services. They also put reps through sensitivity training so they learn how to handle irate customers, even when these customers are completely out of line.

    We’ve conducted some of those trainings for construction workers, tree engineers and utility companies. Most people tell us they genuinely want to help solve people’s problems. Yet, the stories they share are chilling.

    Electric company workers are required to trim trees away from power lines to keep customers safe. One worker told us a customer threatened him with a knife because he didn’t want his tree touched. Utility workers frequently tell tales of angry dogs coming after them. Water department workers have similar stories even when they are working tirelessly to repair main breaks and restore water service. There have even been reports of customer service reps who have killed themselves due to the stresses of the job.

    As a result, companies are trying to help these employees. Nordstrom has created quiet rooms for people to meditate. Call centers have hired on-call psychiatrists. Other companies bring in massage therapists and conduct stress relief workshops. Our sensitivity training programs are focused on communication; how to communicate with angry customers, techniques to diffuse conflicts, body language and better listening skills. You can’t change someone’s obnoxious behavior, but you can change your response to that behavior.

    Regardless of the interaction, over time, people forget the specifics of what happened, but they never forget how the service representative made them feel. Just last month, I flew coast-to-coast on American Airlines. From less leg room to missed connections, to seat snafus, people are quick and often justified when complaining about today’s air travel experiences. Many of these stories even make news headlines. I fly a lot and have also had some of these experiences.

    Yet, on my flights, there are more good experiences than bad. One of the flight attendants on that American flight was exceptional: funny, personable and warm. I filled out a form on the airline’s website to recognize her for outstanding customer service. Most of us and I include myself, are far more likely to complain than compliment.

    So, whether you are the customer or the representative, here are a few tips that work for both sides.

    1. Word Choice. The words you use matter. Instead of “we can’t do that”, try “unfortunately, that is not a service we offer, however here is what we can do for you”. Now the message is positive and it’s about them, not you.
    2. 2. Take Responsibility. Customers want you to tell them how you will fix their problems. They don’t care about yours. Instead of “our vendor had an issue which prevented us from getting your service restored quickly’, try “let me see what I can do for you” or “here is what we are doing to resolve this as quickly as possible.”
    3. Shut Up and Listen. My first book was titled Shut Up and Say Something. In this case, the opposite is true. If someone is angry, let them vent without interrupting. When they are finished, instead of responding with a robotic pre-scripted answer, ask pointed questions that help them further explain the problem so you come across as someone who truly wants to help them fix it. If you’re the complaining customer, come up for air so the rep can ask questions and help you solve your problem.

    Thanks in part to technology making it easier to reach people, today’s consumers have high expectations and short fuses when it comes to customer service. While no one has a right to treat anyone disrespectfully, when someone has a bad experience, posts to social media can tarnish your reputation faster than ever before.

    That said, word of mouth still goes a long way. Just today, I phoned a hotel chain, annoyed that I had submitted receipts and done exactly what the customer service representative told me to do, to receive a refund for a problematic stay at one of their properties. Despite repeated emails, I never heard back or received confirmation that my request was being processed.

    So, I called. When I was rerouted to the second department who said they’d have to transfer me to someone else, the representative sensed my annoyance and frustration. She apologized, asked me questions and listened. Then she stayed on the line and resolved the problem even though it wasn’t her responsibility. She surprised me by awarding me bonus points toward my next stay.

    While I’m not posting to social media, I was so pleased that I told my mother and my son and my husband and some friends. I will book a room at this hotel chain again and thanks to word of mouth, so will they.

    If you want your company to truly stand out, make sure exceptional customer service is center stage.

     
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