Updates from December, 2018 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • feedwordpress 20:39:21 on 2018/12/18 Permalink
    Tags: , , satisfaction,   

    Lessons Learned at UPS: Keep Calm and Carry On 

    2:11 p.m.

    I went to the UPS office to ship a small package before 3:00 p.m. which was the last pick up of the day. One woman was being waited on and there were two other people in front of me. However, the counter clerk appeared efficient, so I assumed the line would move quickly.

    Assumptions can be dangerous.

    The woman being waited on said she didn’t want to send her package through UPS. She just wanted to know what it would cost so she could compare it to other services. The employee was trying to determine a price but needed to enter information into the computer to be accurate. She didn’t have the information he needed and became irritated at him. Still trying to help her, he Facetimed with his supervisor. The supervisor couldn’t fix it, so he called a technician who promised to be at the store within ten minutes.

    At this point, the woman chastised the employee, said she didn’t understand why he couldn’t understand what she was saying and stormed out of the store.

    2:31 p.m.

    Next customer. This man gave the UPS clerk a package sealed in a United States Postal Service (USPS) envelope. The clerk explained that it couldn’t be sent in a USPS envelope from a UPS office as they were two different organizations. Clearly irritated, he began to give the worker a hard time. Once again, calm, polite and patient, the UPS man tried to find a solution and asked the customer if he had ever sent anything from UPS before. This way, he explained, he could look the account up in the computer and see what he could do. The customer responded, “let’s just pretend I have.” More explaining from the clerk. More defiance from the customer.

    2:50 p.m.

    Enter the UPS delivery man. He came to collect packages for his final pick up of the day. The woman in front of me interrupted the man in front of her to ask the clerk if she could get her package onto the truck. I said I had also come early to make sure my package went out today.

    The defiant customer turned toward me and exclaimed “are you blaming me for the delay?” Not wanting to end up as a post on social media that might go viral, I calmly said I wasn’t blaming anyone and just wanted to get my package out. The insolent customer muttered something to the clerk and stormed out of the store. The clerk thanked her for coming.

    Two down. One to go.

    3:04 p.m.

    The woman in front of me was returning a pair of shoes. Easy. I’d be waited on in no time. So, I thought. She originally purchased the shoes in a size 7 she told the clerk. Those were too small she continued, so she ordered them in an 8. They were shipped to her boyfriend’s house in another state, but her boyfriend broke up with her. She thought he loved her, but it turned out he has mental problems. He’s a mental health counselor, but in her opinion, he is the one who needs counseling. Anyway, she continued explaining to the UPS person behind the counter, she’s returning the size 8 because she thinks they are too big, but she’s not sure. They fit correctly at the toe, but her heels kept popping out. She wants to make sure that the return package shows her address and not the ex-boyfriend’s address.

    3:12 p.m.

    She also wrote a note explaining the situation that she’s included in the package. Would he like to hear it? Well, she’ll read it to him to see what he thinks. When she was done, she asked him if he thought it sounded okay. He nodded.

    At this point, I wasn’t sure whether I was really awake, or I was having a bad dream.

    3:22 p.m.

    The delivery driver returns. The shoe woman leaves. My turn. The clerk asks me if I’ve ever shipped from UPS before. I reply, “let’s pretend I have.” Not understanding my attempt at humor, I provided the information he needed, and he quickly completed the transaction.

    3:29 p.m.

    More than one hour later, I finally leave the store.

    Talking does not equal communication. Yet, many of us provide too many details, tend to over-explain, send long wordy emails and deliver hour long presentations that could have been presented in fifteen minutes. The results, especially at work, could be significant.

    If you’re not fully attentive, you may miss an email with important information. If you’re too busy talking and not listening, you may botch an important deal. If you’re too long winded, you could blow a job interview because you’re rambling, instead of making key points. Besides, according to author Joseph McCormack, our brains can’t handle it.

    McCormack says the human brain has the capacity to absorb 750 words per minute, but the average person can only speak 150 words per minute. That means an extra 600 words are floating around in there which gives us more time to tune out and get bored. So, if we’re chastising a worker, babbling to a clerk or taking too long to get to the point, chances are that person isn’t really hearing us.

    What’s the fix?

    Time Testing

    In our programs, we challenge people to present information in different time increments. For example, if their presentation is thirty minutes, we ask them to deliver it in thirty, twenty and even ten minutes. The results are typically astounding. Speakers start honing in on what’s important, eliminate unnecessary details and command attention for longer periods of time.

    Hit the Headline

    Since attention spans start dwindling after ten seconds, it’s important to grab attention as soon as you speak. Like a great headline that draws you in, your first few words should do the same. Make your most important point as soon as you start talking.

    Preparation

    There are many reasons people ramble including nerves, trying to impress and being unsure of how to draw others out. In business however, we observe the lack of preparation techniques. That’s not to say people don’t prepare. They do. But, instead of trying to cram ten pounds of information into a two-pound bag, learning how to effectively use message models will help even the most seasoned presenters condense information.

    Back to the UPS office. Perhaps the real communication lesson learned is from the UPS clerk. Attentive, calm, resourceful and patient. He was also outwardly non-judgmental, which is difficult when people appear hostile. He showed us that it’s important to take all kinds of communication seriously, but not personally. He barely talked. He just listened, which signals he understood their frustration even if he couldn’t fix the problem to their satisfaction.

     
  • feedwordpress 21:00:38 on 2018/12/12 Permalink
    Tags: , , , ,   

    Joan’s Naughty and Nice List for Assistants 

     

    During a Facebook Live event Joan Burge, Founder and CEO of Office Dynamics International, had discussed her Naughty and Nice List for Assistants. This discussion highlighted many great things that can be practiced in the office as well as actions that should be avoided. In the middle of the live stream, Joan asked the viewers to give her some examples of naughty behavior practiced in the office as well as some nice behaviors.

    Be sure to watch the video for some great, funny, and “oh my gosh” kind of answers.  Special guest appearance by Melia!

     

    And here is Joan’s list!

    Naughty:

    • Not adequately preparing your executive for a trip
    • Gossip about your peers (or anyone else)
    • Take on too much work
    • Multi-task
    • Bring your bad attitude to work
    • Not be a team player
    • Withhold information from others
    • Be stagnant in your growth or education
    • Text or read messages while others are talking to you
    • Ignore signals that you are under too much stress
    • Intentionally not give your boss an important message
    • Spike your boss’s coffee

     

    Nice:

    • Give your best every day
    • Be patient with others
    • Care about your executive’s success
    • Take the initiative
    • Remind your executive of important meetings
    • Share your knowledge with your peers
    • Be a leader
    • Champion a cause
    • Make time for yourself
    • Make others look good
    • Listen to others when your opinions are different
    • Be organized and ready for your day
    • Gather a group of your peers for a mini training session
    • Let your executive know that you appreciate him or her
    • Give yourself a BIG pat on the back at the end of the day!

     

    ©Copyright Office Dynamics International 2018.

    The post Joan’s Naughty and Nice List for Assistants appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 17:10:28 on 2018/12/11 Permalink
    Tags: , ,   

    Bouncing Back from Failure 

     

    Has it been another week of adventure? A lot can happen between Monday and Friday, can’t it?

    I’d like to focus today on Turning Failure into Success. Failure is a dirty word in the corporate world. And our success-oriented society often makes it difficult for those who fail to adjust. This negative attitude often forces people to take job-related failures personally, even if they had little to do with the actual events.

    When failure occurs, many people go through a mourning process similar to that for the death of a loved one: 1) denial, 2) bargaining, 3) anger, 4) depression, and 5) finally, acceptance. While no one embraces failure, some people take it harder than others, blaming themselves entirely for their lack of foresight. Embarrassed to face their colleagues, unable to confide in their friends or family, they are isolated in their own grief.

    Thought for the week: “I will turn any failure or setback into a success!” Or, “I will encourage someone else who might be experiencing the feeling of failing, whether it is my child, neighbor, or coworker.” Has it been a great week? If not, you can still make a great one!

    Bouncing Back

    1. Acknowledge the failure. When this first, vital step isn’t taken, an atmosphere of fear is created. Instead, face your failure and see that it is an opportunity to learn and grow.
    2.  Ask for help in preventing future failures. If the guilty party doesn’t request help, it may lead this person to say, “I’ll just be more careful next time. I won’t take such a big risk again.” And that sort of thinking leads to stagnation and a loss of creativity and growth for both individuals and organizations.

    Failure can be an opportunity to reflect, rethink values and interests, and then make positive changes. People are often better off after they’ve failed because if it hadn’t been for their missteps, they might still be in the same rut.

    joan_burge_signature

    The post Bouncing Back from Failure appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 19:11:02 on 2018/12/07 Permalink
    Tags: , , ,   

    Things Assistants Do That Executives Appreciate 

     

    I am very fortunate in that I get to read fabulous letters from executives touting the behavior changes they see in their executive or administrative assistants after attending our Star Achievement Series® course. I love reading these letters as 1) I see the training we provided truly worked, but more importantly, 2) I learn what executives appreciate—what executives look for in an assistant—and what executives value and observe.

     

    Recently I have read more than 40 executive letters. These executive letters are one of the requirements for a Star Achievement Series® participant to receive their CEAP (Certified Executive Administrative Professional) designation.

    (Watch Joan present the top 12 during her Facebook Friday video, 12/7/2018)

    Ask yourself the following questions then compare it to the bulleted list below:

    1. Do I do this for my executive?
    2. If you answered “yes” to #1, ask yourself, “How often do I do this?” (This is an important question.)
    3. If you answered “no” to #1, then you might want to incorporate this behavior or habit into your routine.
    • Very aware of organizational priorities
    • Asks me key questions so I can better prepare for my meetings
    • More confidence when addressing conflict in a way that leverages relationships
    • Cultivates professional networks that help us accomplish our goals
    • Speaks up in my team meetings and has brought additional insights into our group forums that are highly valued
    • Open to feedback—productive and enjoyable
    • Takes the initiative and has the comfort level to proactively review documents in preparation for my meetings
    • Reviews my inbox for information that is timely and necessary
    • Truly wants to understand the business for her own learning to better engage and to help me get in front of things
    • More actively takes on a leadership role
    • Ensures we have clarity on meeting objectives, participating actively to ensure we make decisions, and leaving the door open for all participants to weigh in
    • More focus on prompting leaders to ensure critical team meetings occur
    • Increased confidence: more vocal, more influential and exudes a stronger presence with those she works with
    • Has become more inquisitive on my expectations, allowing both of us to think more strategically on where I spend my time and how we approach projects
    • Seeks me out to make sure we are on the same page regarding topics ranging from scheduling to organizational strategy
    • 100% accountable for his (the assistant) actions
    • Chooses the right medium of communication for impact
    • Actively prioritizes around critical deliverables and is always available and flexible
    • Communicates effectively while resolving problems with little to no direction from me
    • Proactive in selecting work that was better suited for her and me, so that both of us were more successful
    • Stands up for herself more often so that others do not take advantage of her accommodating personality
    • Always proactively planning for me thus reducing my set up and pre-coordination time of events
    • Ability to roll with the punches
    • Big picture thinker, looking for opportunities for us to gain efficiency and share best practices
    • Addresses his workload with a greater degree of proficiency and efficiency
    • My assistant looks at my calendar weeks away and helps me think about the time needed to complete projects or get ready for presentations
    • After meetings, my assistant follows up with me to see what “to do” I have from the meeting, if I need a follow-up meeting or if I need to send a recap of the meeting to attendees. This proactive thinking helps me stay ahead.
    • Leverages technology to help me stay organized
    • Relentless enthusiasm and truly wants to make a difference
    • Taken on the task of creating presentations for me or the team
    • Consciously adjusts communication style when addressing various leaders
    • Motivates and encourages peers
    • Manages peace and harmony; dealing with constant distractions daily
    • Takes networking skills very seriously, encouraging teamwork and collaboration throughout our organization
    • Completes assignments quickly and accurately
    • Takes the initiative to converse with me about the expectations and objectives and (she) will give regular feedback on how she is progressing
    • Helps me more with my exchanges of information with my peers
    • Leans in to better understand the whys behind decisions
    • Shows an eagerness to take on stretch assignments
    • Proactively solves problems
    • Appropriately assertive
    • Enables my success by staying two steps ahead
    • Proactively puts together documents for upcoming meetings
    • Takes swift action when given a deliverable
    • Effectively manages my calendar with efficiency in mind
    • Collaborates and communicates with the team without specific direction from me
    • Solution oriented in gathering information or data for an upcoming deliverable
    • (more) Strategic: developing more long-term and process planning to better support the overall operations, team and his actual role

    The Star Achievement Series® is the most comprehensive live training course for administrative and executive assistants. This course is only taught onsite. We offer several options ranging from our trainers coming onsite to having your staff certified to teach the program. If you are interested in learning more about this robust program, you can all 800-STAR-139 or visit https://officedynamics.com/star-achievement-series/

    The post Things Assistants Do That Executives Appreciate appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 15:59:24 on 2018/12/05 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , story   

    Quick Tip #83: Opens and Closes 

    Nailing your opens and closes will help you turn boring talks into brilliant ones. Learn how and why so you can engage listeners and command attention.

     

     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
esc
cancel