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  • feedwordpress 16:20:49 on 2018/08/16 Permalink
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    A Conversation with Joan 

    Over the past 20 years, I have attended several conferences ranging in topics from fiction writing to motivational to professional training and even a full weekend trying to become a more educated outdoor woman. Each conference offered a unique learning opportunity, but none of them provided the ideal balance of professional and personal development that last year’s conference did.

    The Conference for Administrative Excellence not only provided many educational moments with a variety of speakers, I was introduced to some amazing people in my field as well. The conference exceeded all of my expectations.

    How better to share the conference experience than a conversation with the creator herself – The professional, personable, and mentor to many, Joan Burge! I’m honored to have had the opportunity to ask Joan a few questions. Her answers are enlightening and encompass the experience that helps create one of the most respected conferences ever offered. I highly recommend reading them more than once (with a notepad!).

    There is a team behind the amazing conference event. From the first phone call to register for the conference to picking up my name tag, the entire team carried out the professionalism of Joan. I never imagined my experience and learning would stretch so far beyond those few amazing days in October last year. We have so many ways to learn from Joan; webinars, books, blog posts, etc., yet here I am with another amazing opportunity to know and learn even more!

    A Conversation with Joan

    Q: You’ve been a unique blend of experience as an assistant and now executive and business owner (with so much in between!). Can you share a mentorship opportunity you had as an assistant from another assistant and one or two takeaways from that opportunity?

    A: Believe it or not, most of my mentoring came from executives; not peers. I was fortunate to work with some amazing managers and executives who were happy to mentor me about business and how to be a business partner. I do remember one time when an executive assistant mentored me. I was hired by a large corporation in Cleveland, OH as a secretary. I got to work directly with the EA to the CEO of the company. She took me under her wing and taught me a great deal. She and I had a lot of opportunities to interact because of the work we did and my executives reporting up and we physically sat near each other.

    Q: As an assistant, what types of professional development opportunities did you learn from the most?

    A: Live classes were always the best vehicle for me to learn. I love what occurs when I am face-to-face with other attendees and my instructor. I also learn by doing not just reading or watching. My next favorite was attending administrative conferences although there were not many offered in my day, mostly IAAP (then PSI) conferences. My third was reading. I was an avid reader and still am to this day.

    Q: As a business owner and busy executive what top skills can an assistant bring that support you the most?

    A: You are going to be very surprised by my answers because they are not going to be the typical administrative skills most people would mention. So here is my list:

    * Resilience is critical in today’s busy office environment and constant change. An assistant must also be tough skinned when it comes to working with an executive and you have to be able to “take the heat” and not take things personally. You have to be tough enough to take on all the job responsibilities and support today’s executives who operate in a whirlwind on most days.

    * Thinking holistically. Often assistants are in the woods most of their day. They need to step back and look from the top of the forest. See how things connect and work together; see the big picture of what is really happening. This is not an easy skill as some people’s brains prefer to think details. so you may have to work at this one. The idea is to picture yourself in an airplane in the sky. The view is very different at 35,000 feet than when the plane is sitting on the ground.

    * Initiative is very important. Just jump in. Don’t wait to be asked or told what to do. But you have to listen and pay attention to your executive. Executives drop clues all the time about what they are thinking and what they might need.

    * Detailed thinking is really important for my assistant because my brain likes to think big picture and vision. It’s not that I don’t get to the details. Of course, I must do that for the work I do. Most high-level executives are focused on the big picture or they are thinking of the 50 things they must get done, but they aren’t necessarily thinking of every little detail related to the 50 things.

    * Be inquisitive. Ask questions? If your executive is meeting with a new client, ask questions about the expectation of that meeting? If your executive mentions a new project or talk force they will be working with, ask them to tell you more about the mission and the people. When your executive delegates projects or even talks about an upcoming trip, ask questions. Be curious. The idea is to get inside your executive’s head so you can be proactive and assist at a higher level. I have always said, the more you get inside your executive’s head, the better you can do your job.

    * Ability to change gears in a heartbeat. This is a must! We do not have the luxury of dragging our feet. The organizations I work with and the executives I interact with at large organizations are dealing with change minute by minute and their support staff needs to move fast. You can become change proficient. It is a skill you can learn just like any other skill. I have been teaching assistants to thrive on change for 28 years.

    Q: In Give Yourself Permission to Live the Big Life, you talk about the five pillars in great detail. You highlight taking care of yourself. What personal development and self-care tips do you recommend to assistants?

    A: #1. Make time for yourself. Notice I said, “make.” If you wait for someone to give you permission, it will never happen. Do something fun or relaxing during that time. Maybe go to the salon or spa. Or maybe go to lunch with a good friend. During the summer, I love to go to the Lifetime Athletic pool in Las Vegas, they have a gorgeous pool area. It is like a resort. I go on the weekend early morning, around 8:30 and hang out until right after lunch. I just chill. I put my air pods in, listen to music, go in the water, and people watch. Or just look at the beautiful blue sky and palm trees. It’s heaven.

    #2. Your Wellness Pillar is critical. Make time to work out whether at home or at a gym. Or take walks throughout the week. You must take care of your body so it will take care of you. Now that doesn’t mean you won’t get sick or have surgeries. In 2014 I had brain surgery (successful) and in 2015, I had open heart surgery (successful). My doctors told me I survived these two huge, life-threatening surgeries because I was in good shape and took care of myself. Please…. get your annual exams, make good choices with food, and keep your body moving. This does not mean I never eat ice cream or cookies! I do and I love red wine (which is very good for the body as long as it is limited). Also, your mental health is very important. You must also feed your mind with good thoughts.

    #3. Make sure you build a good network of friends and a support group. We cannot do life alone. I have all kinds of friends (professional and personal) who I can call on at any time. That is because, for years, I have reached out to others. I have been open to meeting people and getting to know them. In turn, they want to know me.

    #4.  Have fun!!! I know so many people who, as they chronologically age, they age in how they think and act. That is not me! I feel and think about 20 years younger than my age. I make an effort to stay “hip” by surrounding myself with younger people and talking to my children and grandchildren to learn about the latest music and trends. I go to live concerts with my girlfriends. Don’t get into a rut—that is for sure a death sentence.

    Q: What professional questions would you recommend an assistant ask an executive when starting a new position or working with a new executive?

    A: I would start out by asking about the big picture of the relationship. Ask questions such as, “How do you envision us working together? In a partnership?” “How can I best support you?”

    It is also good to ask, “What are the top 5 skills most important to you that an assistant should possess?”

    Next ask, “What are the top 3 things that drive you crazy?” Every executive knows the answer to this one and you want to know this up front, whether they are related to you or just in general.

    Then I would focus on the daily processes and get in agreement as to how you both will handle them such as daily huddles, travel, meetings, follow-up, and email. A great resource for this conversation is my Executives and Assistants Working in Partnership Guide as I mapped out the most common processes and best practices. It’s a great tool to create the conversation you need to have with a new executive. (You can purchase this Guide at www.OfficeDynamics.com).

    Q: Can you share one or two tips every executive and assistant could incorporate into their routines for better productivity and to build their professional relationship?

    A: The best advice I have practiced for 4 decades and have given executives and assistants it to have daily huddles. Daily huddles are to be done in person or via the phone (not text or email). This is where you actually talk to each other, confirm the day’s priorities and get clarification on what’s happening relative to your executive or yourself. Next is to really pay attention to each other throughout the day by getting a temperature check.

    Q: As an assistant how did you organize a typical day?

    A: My typical day was to first understand the top priorities for that day. Then I would do my best to stay on the top priorities during the day. As new requests came in, I would determine if they were more important than what I was currently working on and if not, they got put aside depending on if they were a B or C priority. I physically keep things organized. I didn’t have papers and such strewn all over my desk. I had need stacks or piles according to priority. If something did not need to be worked on in the next 72 hours, it went in my follow-up system. I didn’t give it a second thought until I pulled it up days’ later.

    I also kept very organized by taking copious notes. I jotted everything down whether on a post-it note or napkin. I knew I would not possibly remember everything that was thrown at me. I would go back through my notes and little papers throughout the day to ensure I didn’t miss anything that was a priority.

    Q: Please share a few of your favorite books with us.

    A: * The Compound Effect by Daren Hardy

    * How to be Like Walt: Capturing the Disney Magic Every Day of Your Life (I just read this book this spring as I was starting to work with Walt Disney World). This is by far one of the best books I have ever read. It is a story filled with inspiration, hardship and hundreds of great lessons ranging from leadership to being an animated communicator, selling your ideas, never giving up on your ideas, and much more. Every person in the business world needs to read this book.

    Q: What are a few ‘new’ technologies you use often?

    A: I actually do not use a lot of different technologies or apps. Sometimes there are just too many options and it can be overwhelming. And I find some of them do not make me more productive. Of course, I love my iPad (newer, bigger, lightweight screen with the keyboard by Apple); loving my AirPods (no wires!); iPhone. I use a few good apps special to my needs. I have an Alexa I use frequently.

    Q: What are a few processes or parts of your routine that have not changed throughout your career?

    A: I have tried and true processes that I have not changed because they really work! They are my:

    * Follow-up system. I still love the 43 hanging file system. It never fails me.

    * To Do tray on my desk which only holds items I must get done within 72 hours.

    * Prioritization method. I identify tasks and projects as A, B, and C. Within the A category, I have A1, A2, A3 and maybe A4.

    * Staying focused. I try my very best to stay focused on my task or conversation at hand.

    * Before I close up at the end of the day, I go back through my to-do items for the next day. I make sure I have them in the right priority order so I am ready to jump in the next morning.

    * I run through emails one more time at the end of the day to make sure I did not miss anything important and flag items I need to get back to early the next day.

    * Every day, I am a student. I pay attention to whatever crosses my path to see what I might pick up or add to my knowledge base or skill set.

    Q: Finally, during the annual conference there is an evening celebration. You have said how important that evening is to celebrate the uniqueness and how special the assistants are and I’m so looking forward to this year’s Glitz and Glam Gala! (I have my dress already)….For fun….Which themed celebration evening during the conference did you enjoy the most? Why?

    A: That is a tough question because the past several years we have had fabulous themes such as Havana nights and a Ghostly Gala. But if I have to choose, my favorite was about 8 or 9 years ago when we first starting holding Gala night. It was very much glamorous like this year’s theme. We had a red carpet for attendees and everyone dressed up. Our attendees loved getting glammed up because they rarely do that. We had Cirque performers that night, entertainment from the Strip (which we have every year), and an awards event. This year will certainly be as fabulous! We have some very special things planned for Gala since it is our 25th year anniversary.

     

    I hope you enjoyed this opportunity to get to know Joan better. I know I sure did!

    What question would you ask Joan?

     

     

    dana_buchananDana Buchanan is a 20 plus year professional assistant with a passion for writing and offers a unique and professional perspective to projects and brainstorming sessions! She enjoys helping others discover key steps toward their career focus, job search, or self-employment exploration by creating or editing resumes, researching a particular type of job search, discovering business ideas and the action needed to succeed and loves sharing interviewing tips! Dana is also available to speak to small groups.

    You can read and follow Dana’s blogs at Success Encourager

     

     

     

     

     

     

    The post A Conversation with Joan appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:03:57 on 2018/08/09 Permalink
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    Joan’s 5 Favorite Inspirational Quotes 

    Merriam-Webster defines inspiration as “a divine influence or action on a person believed to qualify him or her to receive and communicate sacred revelation.” But what does inspiration mean to you? Where do you draw it from? What triggers your emotions and intellect to dig deep and keep going?

    Joan Burge, Founder and CEO of Office Dynamics International, has been inspiring and motivating those inside and outside of the Administrative/Executive Assistant field for over 30 years but where does Joan draw some of her inspiration from?

    Here are Joan’s 5 Favorite Inspirational Quotes. What are some quotes that you refer to for inspiration? Please feel free to share and inspire others!

     

     

     

     

    August 14, 2018

    10:00 AM – 11:00 AM PT

    The post Joan’s 5 Favorite Inspirational Quotes appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:15:04 on 2018/08/07 Permalink
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    Adapting to Change 

    There can never be too many discussions about change. It’s constant, it’s inevitable, unexpected at times, but it can be extremely rejuvenating. No matter how many times change occurs in life, expected or not, it can seem as if you are not in control. Unexpected change disrupts a routine, but if we reevaluate the current routine and what opportunities the unexpected change offers then we take control. With a positive outlook, adapting to change provides control and allows the opportunity for personal and professional growth.

    A few of the types of change:

    • Career
    • Position or duty changes
    • Health
    • Family or home life
    • Monetary
    • Relocation

    Types of change are as vast as the types of personalities we encounter throughout life. And every single type of change can affect each of us uniquely. There are not any magic words to stop change from happening, but there are ways to adapt and be in control.

    Suggestions for adapting to change:

    • Reach out for support. Talk about the situation and listen to supportive feedback.
    • Evaluate the situation and focus on facts. What opportunities can you explore?
    • Remind yourself of accomplishments, skills you have developed and your unique traits; focus on what you do have control of.
    • Explore all options you have – even ones you may think are unlikely…change can be an opportunity to take chances; a chance to leap and focus on a dream. A friend’s daughter lost her job a few years ago and took that as a sign to go for her dream job; she now happily operates a food truck business!
    • Don’t react quickly, take time to breathe and focus. Get a game plan in place.
    • If your job has changed ask yourself if the change will be a positive or if you need to take control and make your own changes. Maybe it’s time to find a better career match.
    • Grow & learn; read, talk to mentors, attend training or a conference, watch webinars, etc. I suggest constant learning before the unexpected change occurs so you can adapt more easily

    Adapting to professional change shows professionalism and confidence. I can recall my first major professional lesson in adapting to change as if it were yesterday.

    Several years ago, I advanced into one of my very favorite career positions. I worked with an amazing team, flexible hours, great manager, excellent benefits and pay, challenges that provided skills I use to this day, an office with a great view, control of developing procedures and next to one of the best coffee shops! After three years, a new director came in, eliminated a few positions and changed my role. It happened quickly; my office was moved, hours extended, job duties increased, my favorite aspects of my job were taken away and I no longer reported to my great manager.

    I went home that evening and cried…I was devastated. I got caught up in the feeling of thinking I was not in control of the situation. After a pep talk from my husband, a great coworker and from my sister I set up a meeting with the director. I may not have control of his thoughts, but I had control over how I reacted and my confidence. Nothing he could do or say took away all of the hard work I had taken pride in and procedures I had developed (that was part of my personal pep talk).

    I typed up a list of accomplishments (quite proudly so and smiling ear to ear) and confidently carried them with me as I walked into the conference room for our meeting. He would just have to change his mind when he got to know me better and saw my wonderful list. Right?

    He was late…I was not distracted through, I stayed focused. I was armed with facts and not letting his busy schedule & late arrival shake my confidence. As the minutes turned into five-minute increments my palms started to sweat and my mouth got dry. I shook my head… ‘you got this’ I told myself as I looked at that amazing list of accomplishments!

    He did show up…25 minutes late, but I was still prepared and ready. He shook my hand, smiled and apologized for being late…we were off to a good start. I explained how I deserved some of my duties back and proposed suggestions that would allow me to keep those duties & my schedule. I spoke clearly, stayed focused on facts, my palms stopped sweating, I was doing great (patting self on back).

    Then, not even halfway through my speech, he stood up and pointed out the window and yelled THAT BIRD. Yes, bird. My heart raced, my palms started to sweat again, my mouth was so dry. I wasn’t sure how to react. He wasn’t listening, he already made up his mind and it didn’t matter what I said. Finally, as he stood behind me pointing out the window, he explained there had been a bird swooping up and down and down and up (yes, he imitated this action). He kept explaining the swooping action and then excused himself to another meeting, after confirming his decisions were final.

    I sat there alone looking out at the bird. Ah, that free bird, swooping from branch to branch, now he was in complete control. I smiled. I didn’t cry, I didn’t get upset. I focused on the things that I did have control over. I was still the same unique person, I was still a professional. My ‘ex’ manager told me he would write me an excellent letter of recommendation if I decided to move on. My coworkers offered support. The next weekend I started looking for another job, a month later I was working closer to home, the new position offered free tuition, great benefits, flexible hours, and duties I loved.

    A few months later I attended an event at the old job and walked up to the director (the birdman) and thanked him. He smiled and asked why…I explained that his decision created a door of opportunity for me and I was grateful.

    One full-time job and a few temp positions came after that one. That entire career journey led me to my current position and I’m grateful for the amazing opportunities the past several years have offered. Each decision in life, even the ones we don’t feel we have complete control over, lead us to the next step of our lives.

    Adapting to change is an opportunity for growth.

    If you stay true to yourself and confident in your uniqueness, then change is easier to appreciate. Don’t let change take charge and control. You’re in control of you and how you react. It’s OK to be disappointed, cry, be upset, but all of those emotions are temporary and should be treated as such. A change will come; expect it…welcome it…control it.

    If you are going through a change right now, especially professional change, that you don’t quite feel in control of, reach out to mentors, friends, and others. Evaluate your options and remember you are not alone, you are unique, but not alone!

    Change is opportunity…share how you deal with change in the comments below!

     

    dana_buchanan

    Dana Buchanan is a 20 plus year professional assistant with a passion for writing and offers a unique and professional perspective to projects and brainstorming sessions! She enjoys helping others discover key steps toward their career focus, job search, or self-employment exploration by creating or editing resumes, researching a particular type of job search, discovering business ideas and the action needed to succeed and loves sharing interviewing tips! Dana is also available to speak to small groups.

    You can read and follow Dana’s blogs at Success Encourager

     

     

     

    August 14, 2018

    10:00 AM PT – 11:00 AM PT

    Register Here

    The post Adapting to Change appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:28:55 on 2018/08/02 Permalink
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    Creating A Friendly Work Atmosphere 

    Create a Friendly and Approachable Atmosphere

    In our fast-paced world, people are becoming detached and desensitized. We are more transaction-based, unfocused on how our interaction is affecting other people. When you have that style of interaction with others, the world becomes decidedly colder. You must be aware of when that happens and take the steps necessary to turn it around:

    • Your body language and facial expressions provide visual clues, whether you intend them to or not. You need to be aware of messages you might be sending that you don’t want to send. You should not assume you are communicating what you think you are! You must be open to inventorying your communication style and be aware of cultural diversities that could work for, or against, you.
    • It is important to be genuinely interested when a person is communicating with you. Stopping, listening, and asking questions demonstrates your interest.
    • Assess what kind of environment you work in. Do you post a warning sign that states, “Stop. I am in a bad mood,” when you are having a rough day? Some assistants will say that is exactly the message they want to send. However, even when you are in a bad mood, which is very possible, you want to be very cautious of the message you send to peers or your manager. Sending this message is not conducive to controlling your attitude or choosing what attitude to wear each day.
    • What kinds of things do you surround yourself with that make you look unapproachable? (Your job is to support people whether you want to be bothered or not.)

    Come In with Zeal, Leave with Zen

    You go to work with zeal, having a mindset that you will conquer the day. Then you get into the office and find it is like a zoo.

    You want to leave with Zen, so you approach work by being excited about what you are doing. You approach your work with a good attitude, no matter what happens!

    You find that your work improves, and as that happens, you feel good about what you are accomplishing and how the work is moving forward.

    You are now adding value every day, and it isn’t dependent upon everything at work being perfect. You are managing your attitude (in spite of the zoo!) and so, when it’s time to go, you leave with a Zen-like peacefulness, knowing you cannot be moved by what’s happening around you.

    You form your own emotional “environment,” and in so doing, you work better and have more peacefulness. That’s how you come in with zeal and leave with Zen.

     

    This excerpt is from the book, Who Took My Pen…Again? by Joan Burge. This is available for purchase at the Office Dynamics Success Store.

    The post Creating A Friendly Work Atmosphere appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:15:17 on 2018/08/01 Permalink
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    Free Chapters From Joan’s Book: Who Took My Pen…Again? 

    Book_For_Administrative_Assistants

    Thank You!

    It’s not very often that Office Dynamics can celebrate another book release by Joan but when we do, the amount of support shown is truly amazing. Joan’s new book, Joan’s Greatest Administrative Secrets Revealed, is set to be released in Septemeber, 2018.

    As a thank you, we’d like to give you three free chapters from Joan’s book, Who Took My Pen…Again?

    So, once again, thank you from the entire Office Dynamics International team and we hope you enjoy reading these chapters.

     

    Chapter 7, Creative Thinker

    If you ask a roomful of kindergarteners, “Who here is a creative artist?” every hand will go up. Yet by the time that same question is asked in middle school, less than half will still raise their hands. What changed?

    We are all created to be creative. And being creative adds value every day. However, within each of us is also a highly developed critic. This critic evaluates and judges what we plan, think, do, envision. When we harshly judge our “product,” the result as well as future ensuing ideas, concepts, and vision, suffers. Soon our creativity shrivels.

    Many of us lose that “free spirit” creative thinking. Because we encounter results that may be different or varied from our dream, we give up.

    DOWNLOAD PDF TO READ MORE

     

    Chapter 11, Invest (in yourself)

    When we think of “investment” we automatically think of dollar signs. Don’t limit yourself to such a small portion of what investing in you means. To invest in you means to believe in you. To pick up a book on a subject you want to learn more about, taking a class at the gym, volunteer at your local soup kitchen – you discover more about yourself by taking the time to step back from routine living to do these types of things, such as to set a goal and attain it.

    In these current times of uncertainty, more than ever before people have leaned toward the entrepreneurial mindset, but in fact, we always need to be seeking ways to grow ourselves, whether in a recession or not. We should always act upon what it is we believe in at all times!

    DOWNLOAD PDF TO READ MORE

     

    Chapter 13, Lead

    Administrative professionals and executive assistants often see themselves in their support roles as being “non-leaders.”Nothing, however, could be further from the truth!

    You may not be the CEO or VP of the company, but you ARE a leader. A senior-level human resources associate once said something profound: she said it was the administrator’s job to make the job important. Each administrator in your organization needs to raise her sights to elevate the career so that she, and others who follow, can grow and become better in their skills.

    Leading is investing; you can lead others by investing in them.

    DOWNLOAD PDF TO READ MORE

     

     

    Register For The Free Webinar Here

    The post Free Chapters From Joan’s Book: Who Took My Pen…Again? appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
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