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  • feedwordpress 08:00:51 on 2018/09/17 Permalink
    Tags: Extraverts, , Introverts, , , , , ,   

    How to Be Great at Managing Both Introverts and Extroverts 

    As an executive leadership coach, my job often involves helping extroverts understand introverts and vice versa.

    We tend to think of these categories in terms of whether people are outgoing or shy, but it’s more complex than that. Here are some of the basic differences:

    Extraverts have a tendency towards external processing and outward expression.
    Introverts have a tendency towards internal experiences and inward reflection.

    Extraverts gain energy from being with others.
    Introverts often feel drained when they spend too much time with others, particularly strangers.

    Extraverts get bored and restless if they spend too much time alone.
    Introverts look forward to time alone to recharge their batteries and restore their energy.

    Extraverts tend to be very aware of what and who is around them.
    Introverts often don’t pay much attention to their surroundings.

    Extraverts figure things out best by talking them over with other people.
    Introverts need time alone to think things through and get in touch with their inner selves.

    Extraverts find it easy to get through a first draft when writing a report.
    Introverts have a hard time getting started because they want their ideas to be well thought out before they commit to putting anything on paper.

    Extraverts tend to speak first and think later, and are likely to put their foot in their mouth.
    Introverts often walk away wondering, “Why didn’t I think to say that?”

    To help extraverts excel, allow them to express themselves as they think things through. Be appreciative of their creative and innovative thinking, listen to their many ideas, let them multitask, and respect their independent nature. Make good use of their attentiveness and interpersonal skills.

    To help introverts to excel, give them time—time to think, time to speak, time to make decisions. Respect their private nature and their need to work alone. Let them learn at their own pace and have time alone to process and think. Give them information in increments so they can digest and rework it in their heads. Make good use of their thorough, deliberative nature.

    Of course, these categories are generalizations, and few people fit squarely into either. Leaving room for individual variation, it can be helpful to recognize the differences in the way extraverts and introverts think, work and achieve. Letting every member of your team find their own sweet spot allows everyone to excel on their own terms.

    Lead from within: As a leader, you have to be able to get along with all kinds of people, bridging the gaps in personalities and relationships and connecting your team members with the work and environment that will help them excel.


     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Art by: Lolly Daskal

    The post How to Be Great at Managing Both Introverts and Extroverts appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:25 on 2018/09/17 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , Succcess, , ,   

    How to Think on Your Feet When You’re Speaking Under Pressure 

    Anyone in any kind of leadership position needs to master the skill of adept thought and speech in stressful high-pressure circumstances. In my work as an executive leadership coach with clients that include top leaders around the world, it’s an area I’m asked about often.

    Here are some tips and tactics to help you think on your feet. The secret is to be prepared: learn and practice a set of skills you can rely on in situations that put you under pressure.

    Repeat what you just heard. One of the hardest parts of contributing to a conversation is answering a direct question, especially when you can’t honestly give the expected answer. Allow yourself to pause and think; don’t feel that you need to fill the space with words right away. A tentative or uncertain reply won’t help your case. To calm your nerves and buy yourself a little time, simply repeat the question that was asked. As an added benefit, you can double-check your understanding of the question.

    Always be thoroughly prepared. Plenty of highly intelligent people aren’t good at speaking spontaneously, but with enough preparation you can still be brilliant. Learn every fact and figure, every prominent person in your field and their perspective, the background of the issue. A prepared mind is a smart mind.

    Learn to organize your thoughts. Constantly ask yourself the following questions: What do I not understand which could be better clarified? What question could I ask that would advance the discussion? What perspective or insight do I have that’s shareable? Don’t worry about being the smartest—sometimes it’s best to be the most organized and effective.

    Ask for clarification. Asking for clarity will compel those who are speaking to be more specific. Don’t give cause for your query to be interpreted as a challenge, but keep it neutral: “When you say X, can you please clarify. . . .”

    Project confidence. Adept thinking in the moment boils down to self-confidence. Speak in a strong voice, make lots of eye contact, and keep your tone and body language positive. Remind yourself how much you know about your job, your organization and your industry, and how many people you work with successfully.

    Summarize and stop. Wrap up lengthy responses with a quick summary statement. After that, resist adding anything more.  Be silent. Pause and allow people to fill the silent spaces. They’re absorbing the information you just presented, and speaking during that time can cause confusion.

    Lead from within: When you have to think on your feet and you want to sound smart, make use of the tips to help alleviate the pressure.

     

    N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Think on Your Feet When You’re Speaking Under Pressure appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:30:15 on 2018/09/14 Permalink
    Tags:   

    Don’t Leave Your Readers Guessing 

     

    Whether you’re writing an email, an article, a report, or a proposal, never leave your readers wondering what you actually want.

    Specifically, they shouldn’t have to wonder about these critical components of communicating:

    • Why have you told them this information?
    • What are they are supposed to do with it?

    It’s easy (and lazy) to say, “Give clear instructions and point readers to their next action.” But here’s a more concrete method.

    Use a planning tool called Setting Your Objectives that echoes the traditional journalism basics: Who, What, Why, Where, When, and How.

    Before you write the first sentence, answer each of these questions on paper as they apply to the written piece you’re crafting. The more detail the better . . .

    WHO: Target audience—Who will read this? What do you know about them already? Who will be affected by what your message says?

    WHAT: Message or takeaway, including call to action—What do you want the reader to do, think, believe, or remember as a result of reading your piece? E.g., Attend this important meeting. Consider this point of view. Review this proposal.

    WHY: Purpose and benefits—Why do the readers need this information? What’s in it for them? Why should they care?

    WHEN & WHERE: Logistics—What details need to be spelled out? If it’s an event or meeting, specify the time, location, and other essential facts.

    HOW: Style and tone—How do you want your reader to “hear” you? This is the most important one of all. Be intentional! E.g., polite, apologetic, excited, firm, demanding, laid back, urgent, or something else?

    Once you’ve thought through all of these, it’s smooth sailing. Why? Because your brain has already included the critical points and especially the two we started with:

    • WHY you have told them the information
    • WHAT they’re supposed to do with it.

    By consistently using this planning tool Setting Your Objectives, you’ll find you can craft your pieces more quickly and more completely than ever.

     

    Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping administrative professionals add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips resource to quickly find the right word when it matters most. It allows you to improve your writing through excellent weekly resources in your inbox, including a webinar, crossword puzzles, and a Word Tripper of the Week for 52 weeks. Enjoy a $30 discount at checkout with the code ODI at www.wordtrippers.com/odi.

     

    writing_tips

    The post Don’t Leave Your Readers Guessing appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:32:58 on 2018/09/13 Permalink
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    Assistants Worldwide Who Contributed to a Gratitude Book 

    I am overwhelmed by the hundreds of assistants worldwide who contributed to a Gratitude Book that was presented to me by my son, Brian, on my birthday (August 16).

     

    I don’t really take the time to stop and think about how I impact tens of thousands of administrative and executive assistants around the world. I just do my work. I focus on how I can help assistants live a better life, increase their productivity, and improve the quality of their work life. My work is not work. I love being of service, helping others, being with people and making friends across the globe.

     

    So, of course, I was overwhelmed as I read email after email about how a person’s life was greatly impacted by me—my teachings, lessons, words of wisdom and inspiration, and strategies. I was deeply touched by the words many assistants used to describe me, such as: elegant, well poised, great leader, energetic, smart, vibrant, and always has a smile on her face.

     

    There was one cool piece Judy B. wrote that I’d like to share with you. Judy said:

    You get what being an administrative person is.

    You get what we go through at work.

    You get the need for flexibility, professionalism, teamwork, and the need for confidentiality.

    You get that sometimes we’re the behind-the-scenes support, but that we don’t often get the recognition we deserve.

    You get that sometimes we need another person’s shoulder to lean on for administrative encouragement.

    You get that some of us are administrative junkies and always will be, so we’re forever learning more and growing more.

    Yes, you truly get it!

     

    If you would like to read some of the great notes of gratitude I received or look for your own note, you can do so by CLICKING HERE.

     

    If you contributed to my Gratitude Book, thank you from the bottom of my heart. I am deeply touched and grateful for you.

    The post Assistants Worldwide Who Contributed to a Gratitude Book appeared first on Office Dynamics.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:51 on 2018/09/13 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , ,   

    6 Things Leaders Hate Doing but Need to Do Anyway 

    As an executive leadership coach, I work firsthand with a wide range of leaders, which gives me a good perspective on the things they have in common. Here are six things that virtually every leader I’ve ever worked with does regularly, even though they thoroughly dislike them. If you’re trying to skate by these (or other important things you don’t enjoy), get in the habit of doing them anyway.

    Being vulnerable. Three decades ago, I came up with the phrase Vulnerable is the new strong. Many of my coaching clients disagreed and argued that vulnerability is in fact weakness. I thought then, and still do, that if you show vulnerability, people will respect you more, honor you more and relate to you more. I’m glad to say that most of those who reluctantly went along later came around to agreeing with me.

    Managing. Most leaders want to be the visionary, the one who thinks up the great ideas. Nobody wants to manage the visions through implementation. But the truth is, you cannot become an excellent leader without also knowing how to be an excellent manager. Any leader who is not a good manager risks having their vision and their team compromised by the mismanagement of others.

    Giving feedback. Sharing constructive criticism is a big part of being a leader. If you can’t help people rethink what they’re doing, you’re not truly leading them. People need feedback—they need to know if what they are doing is right or if they need correction. Feedback is a valuable tool that provides direction. Given the right way, it becomes a gift.

    Admitting to mistakes. All great leaders make mistakes along the way, but not many want to admit it. It takes a lot of coaching for some leaders to be able admit when they’re wrong, but the power of admitting to your mistakes is the power of your influence as a leader.

    Exercising self-restraint. I’ve seen leaders who wanted to have a go at their team, their board, their stakeholders—to tell them all what they think and how they feel. But I always coach leaders not to mix bad words with a bad mood. You’ll have many opportunities to change your mood, but you can never replace the words you speak. So even if you hate it, learn self-restraint when it comes to your emotions and make sure the words you speak are intentional and thoughtful.

    Failing. Leaders aren’t perfect; they have weaknesses, shortcomings and failures from time to time. Nobody likes failing. Period. Leaders, in particular, want to be known as winners. But most leaders will tell you that even though they hate failing they continue to take risks, because some of their greatest achievements, most memorable growth and most effective improvements have come from their failures.

    Lead from within: There will be many things you don’t want to do as a leader. Do them anyway.


     

    N A T I O N A L    B E S T S E L L E R
    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockphotos

    The post 6 Things Leaders Hate Doing but Need to Do Anyway appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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