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  • feedwordpress 09:00:46 on 2021/03/02 Permalink
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    How the Best Leaders Build Trust at Work 


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    Trust is a crucial element for any successful team. When team members are working remotely it becomes even more important—but also more difficult to achieve and maintain. Whatever your team’s situation, the best way for you to foster a climate of trust is to lead by example. If you want your people to trust one another, you need to first demonstrate that you trust them yourself. Here’s what that can look like:

    Trust your people to be capable. Give them room to stretch their boundaries without being micromanaged. When you trust your team members with responsibility, you send them a clear message: that the real challenge is not facing what stands before them but learning to believe in what is within them. And if someone’s not giving their best, ask yourself if you’ve truly given them the opportunity to shine. To build a successful team and organization means developing and harnessing the capabilities of each person, and that process starts with trust.

    Trust your people to be credible. An elemental component of trust is credibility—knowing that you can trust what someone says and take them at their word. To build trust in your team, make it a personal police to believe what they tell you unless you have strong evidence to the contrary—and even then, ask questions instead of jumping to conclusions. Don’t rely on your own assumptions.

    Trust your people to be reliable. Show your team not only that you depend on them but also that you trust them to meet expectations and accomplish what needs to be done. Remember, the best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them. And make sure that you’re showing your team the same level of reliability that you expect of them.

    Trust your people to be responsible. Build trust and help your people grow by giving them the authority to deal with the issues that come their way using their best judgment. Let them do what they need to do and say what they need to say without interfering or interrupting. Don’t require that they obtain permission before they make a decision—instead, promote and model genuine accountability.

    Above all, trust yourself. Building trust with others requires a strong sense of self-awareness. Leaders who don’t trust themselves have a hard time trusting others. If you need to work through some personal development in this area, consult a mentor or leadership coach if that option is available to you. Build your own self-trust and self-reliance so you can pass those traits along to others.

    Trust is the glue of leadership. It is the most essential ingredient in bonding relationships and building connections between leaders and their teams, among team members, and within organizations as a whole.

    Lead from within: Trust is the essential foundation of leadership and business; without it, there’s not much to build on.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How the Best Leaders Build Trust at Work appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 04:49:41 on 2021/02/25 Permalink
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    When private conversations go public, the pandemic edition 


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    My husband likes to post on Facebook. During 2020, it became an outlet to share information or lament the political landscape. It all seemed harmless given his Facebook friends share his views and enjoy his posts. However, social media posting can be a slippery slide when you least expect it as my husband unfortunately discovered.

    After attending a virtual event for a friend, I shared with him that a number of people on the call had received the COVID vaccine and I didn’t believe they met the CDC criteria. We had talked a lot about this at home given the systematic problems plaguing the rollout of vaccines. Specifically, we had been discussing how so many seniors and people with medical conditions have not been able to get the vaccine while others, including some of our friends and their children have jumped to the front of the line.

    We know of one person whose family member works at a hospital and was able to secure vaccination appointments for other members of her family who are not eligible at this point in time. We know of another person who fudged what he does for a living so he could get a shot.

    This moral and ethical dilemma is very upsetting to my husband as I’m sure it is to many. Not having a platform to reach the masses, he took to Facebook to vent. He called what’s happening “white privilege” and suggested people in minority communities did not have the same advantages.

    You might be saying well, he’s right. There have been published articles and interviews suggesting the same, so what’s the big deal?

    The big deal is that people at the event saw his post and were offended. A few were outright furious and then turned on me because I shared what was said with him. Because he wasn’t part of the virtual event, he repeated his interpretation of what I told him in a post. That’s like listening in on someone’s private phone call without their knowledge and then telling others what you heard.

    In this case, it turns out that some of the people who were vaccinated work in doctors’ offices and others drove distances to locations that did not have age or other restrictions. Someone else resented his use of the term “white privilege”.

    Whatever you want to call it, my husband’s intent, whether appropriate or not was to point out the inequities of trying to get the vaccine. According to a CNN  report, analysis of data from 14 states showed that vaccine coverage is twice as high among white people on average than it is among black and Latino people.

    Since the beginning of the pandemic, black, Latino and Native Americans have disproportionately been hospitalized and died from the virus. Health experts say that disparity has been linked to access to quality healthcare, vaccine acceptance and whether people have easy access to distribution sites. That has led President Biden to prioritize putting federally supported vaccination centers in high-risk neighborhoods to give people easier access.

    Back to my husband. When he realized he offended people, he took down the post and made some phone calls to apologize to those who appeared most offended. I believe there is an important lesson to be learned.

    It’s about gossip. You can’t take gossip back. You can take a Facebook post down.

    Whether you’re gossiping or posting on social media, I want to believe most people are not acting with any ill-intent. Sometimes we don’t realize that our words may be offensive or misunderstood. Sometimes, we’re frustrated at a situation and just don’t think things through.

    Before you blow up at what seems to be gossip or a social media post you don’t like, ask yourself this question. Why did he or she say this in the first place? Were they being malicious or trying to cause trouble? Or did they say something without understanding the full context of what they were repeating? Then, look at yourself in the mirror before you jump all over others.

    In this case, writing about what happened is my outlet, but I have also learned a lesson. Before I submit this column to my editor who will post it for thousands to see, I’m sending it to my husband to ask permission and make sure I’m not turning something private into something public.

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  • feedwordpress 09:00:59 on 2021/02/18 Permalink
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    This is at the Heart of Every Great Team 


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    Not long ago I was asked, “What’s at the heart of every great team?” It’s a thought-provoking question with arguments to be made for a number of answers—but I didn’t have to think long about my response: the foundation for great teamwork is communication.

    Great teams communicate well and often. They share ideas, brainstorm, ask one another for feedback and have healthy conflicts. They may not agree on everything, but they know how to work through their differences to settle on a sound solution and continue moving forward together.

    Here are some of the most important ways great teams foster the kind of communication that keeps them performing at their peak:

    Speak clearly. The clearer and more concise you are, the better you’ll be understood and the more quickly and efficiently things will get done. Effective communication processes ensure high standards for clarity, speed and content while avoiding politicizing, gossiping and stonewalling.

    Listen actively. Active listening is a simple skill for ensuring clear communication. At its core, it’s nothing more than repeating back what one has heard to confirm a mutual understanding. The person originally speaking may start by saying, “To confirm that we have the same understanding, what did you hear me say?” and the listener responds, “What I heard you say….”

    Inquire curiously. In stages of discussion when ideas are being generated and gathered, team communication should use open-ended questions to provoke inquiry and curiosity. Communication that promotes wide-ranging thinking and mutual learning creates a deeper pool of creative ideas than a rush to react with a solution.

    Share frequently. Great teams encourage collaboration and build a strong knowledge base with robust channels for sharing and information and ideas. The ability to freely share knowledge without gaps or silos is the cornerstone of teams that work well together.

    Collaborate effectively. Great teams work together cooperatively, not competitively, in ways that promote effective working relationships—which, in turn, leads to better team performance and overall productivity. Collaboration is encouraged across departments, management levels, and functions on a regular basis.

    Connect religiously. Connection is perhaps the most crucial component in building a  productive and efficient team. Connected teams drive collaboration, nurture healthy relationships and promote knowledge sharing—all the elements that create high-functioning teams. The more connected your team members feel to one another and to their leadership, the more valued they’ll feel and the more effective the team will be.

    Teamwork has never been easy, but in recent years it has become much more complex. And the trends that make it more difficult seem likely to continue as teams become increasingly global, virtual and project-driven. Understanding the factors that come together to make great teams work at their best will be more important than ever before.

    Lead from within: If you want to set your team up for success, take their communication seriously. Being intentional about building strong communication makes all the difference.


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post This is at the Heart of Every Great Team appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 23:16:11 on 2021/02/17 Permalink
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    Is an Administrative Assistant Certification or Designation Worth It? 


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    In the ever-evolving administrative profession, a topic of recent interest has been training, certification, and designations. Many top-notch organizations are looking to the future with an eye towards optimization and growth. They’re carefully considering what they will require of their administrative team and want to move them towards higher levels of training and education.  This…
     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:57 on 2021/02/15 Permalink
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    The Best Way to Boost Employee Motivation 


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    If you want your employees to have more stamina and drive, the best place to start is by learning what motives them. Getting the best from people doesn’t come with a one-size-fits-all formula. It means working to understand and address the inner drivers that will boost their motivation.

    The best leaders understand that they play a critical role in their employees’ motivation. Here are four of the most important things you can do to keep your people happy and productive:

    Create a psychologically safe culture. Give people room to express themselves and voice their opinions without fear of judgment or criticism. In a comfortable and secure environment, your team can come together in a spirit of open collaboration, engagement and involvement, with everyone contributing their ideas as well as their labor. When people feel understood and appreciated for who they are, they’re ready to participate instead of just showing up.

    Minimize organizational politics. A culture that’s governed by organizational politics is disempowering and demotivating. The influence of political game-playing is so damaging to employee motivation and morale that it’s not enough to minimize it—you need to eliminate it entirely. In its place, establish a culture in which rewards and promotions are based only on valid measures of qualifications and performance rather than political considerations or connections to powerful people.

    Recognize and reward people—the right way. Leaders who truly understand motivation maintain a focus on recognizing and rewarding hard work, effort, commitment, tenacity, imagination and risk-taking. The most effective rewards are monetary, so invest as much as your budget will allow in things like pay increases, bonuses, stock options and promotions. Avoid rewards that create pressure for people to achieve specific outcomes, those that risk a large percentage of employees’ compensation and those that pit team members against each other in direct competition. Being rewarded for helping to meet organizational goals boosts people’s feelings of competence and engagement.

    Create meaningful and purposeful goals. One of the best ways for people to find motivation is by putting their energy into something purposeful and meaningful. Make sure that the goals you set for your team, individually and collectively, are clearly tied to your organization’s central mission and purpose. When employees have a sense of purpose at work, they feel passionate, committed and ready to come up with innovative solutions. Their outward-looking focus on serving the organization and their inner determination to excel combine in a single purpose, to serve and to bring value.

    In brief, the most effective way to boost employee motivation is to pay attention and understand the people you’re leading by making them feel safe, secure, recognized and part of a meaningful undertaking. That’s the best motivation you can provide as a leader.

    Lead from within: Be the kind of leader who knows how to boost their employees’ motivation, happiness, productivity and effectiveness.

     

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post The Best Way to Boost Employee Motivation appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
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