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  • feedwordpress 13:13:09 on 2020/09/20 Permalink
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    How the Crowd Provides Air Quality Data 


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    Crowdsourced data is helping society to forecast dangerous air quality, how can we use these models for other areas of business? Major wildfires spanning several western states have so far burned approximately 4.6 million acres. That adds up to an area roughly the same size as Connecticut and Rhode Island combined. As of September 17, 2020, in California alone there have been numerous fatalities and over 6,000 structures destroyed or damaged. The smoke is impacting many areas even those not close to the fires – the Midwest, the East Coast, and Canada. With the effects of the fires spread across whole regions, how can we obtain useful information? The answer is with crowdsourced data. We Are Increasingly Relying on Air-Quality … Continue readingHow the Crowd Provides Air Quality Data
     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:16 on 2020/09/20 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Harassment, , , , Moral, , Unacceptable Behavior,   

    What to Do When a Leader Does Something Unacceptable 


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    After a leadership team meeting I attended not long ago, one of the executives in attendance sent an email asking to speak with me confidentially. When we were able to connect, he asked, “What do you do when someone in leadership above you does something completely unacceptable?”

    The question was disturbing, but not terribly surprising. We may think of most leaders as educated and ethically evolved, but as with any other field, there are some bad apples.

    Faced with the knowledge that a leader in your organization has done something immoral, unethical, illegal or reckless, you have a decision to make. Do you do something about it, or try to push it off to the side and continue working as before? And if you choose to do something, what’s the best way to proceed?

    Most of us want to do the right thing, but it’s not a simple choice. Here are some helpful points to consider:

    Think about the nature of the behavior you witnessed. The first step is to define whether the behavior is something you disagree with—something that violates your personal moral code—or something that’s truly intolerable. Ask yourself some questions: Is it illegal? Does it violate your industry or employer’s code of ethics? Is it an isolated one-time incident, or part of a pattern? How is it affecting others in the workplace? Read up on your employer’s conduct policies to learn about official and unofficial reporting options. You may even be required to report certain things.

    Don’t let yourself become comfortable with being uncomfortable. The first time something happens, you’re likely to feel outraged and furious. But if you choose not to say anything and it happens again, you may be a little less upset. After every instance, it gets a little easier to think of it as just the way things are. Are you OK with the behavior continuing, or is there a cycle that’s important to break?

    Think about repercussions. Whether you decide to take a stand or not, you may experience repercussions in your own career and life. Depending on the severity of the behavior, anonymous reporting options or whistleblower laws may be in effect—but it’s unrealistic to deny that integrity is often costly. On the other hand, if you look the other way and the behavior becomes public through other channels, you may be seen as complicit.

    Consider the range of options. Depending on the situation, you may choose to look for a different job, share your concerns with someone within your organization, or take official action through HR or the legal system. Whatever path you choose, keep a written record of events with as much documentation as possible. You may also want to confide in a close and trusted co-worker.

    Ultimately, you’re the only one who can decide how best to move forward without compromising who you are.

    Lead from within: Sometimes the best you can do is to change what you can, accept what you cannot, and remove yourself from the unacceptable.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

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    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post What to Do When a Leader Does Something Unacceptable appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:15 on 2020/09/17 Permalink
    Tags: , , Cheerleader, , , , , , , , ,   

    Why People Who Want Their Leader to Be a Cheerleader Are Getting It Wrong 


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    Everyone needs someone to motivate and inspire them, whether it’s a parent or a minister or an athlete. People often look to their leaders for that kind of inspiration. And on the surface it makes sense: who wouldn’t want a leader who’s positive and encouraging compared to one who talks tough or is focused on outcomes rather than people? But wanting your leader to be your cheerleader is actually a big mistake.

    Don’t get me wrong—I believe that leaders should be inspiring and positive. But we need much more from those who lead us:

    We need leaders who will challenge us today so we can be better tomorrow. To be challenged can be uncomfortable, and it doesn’t always come with a feel-good message. Motivating people to achieve great things means stimulating and influencing and provoking them to do more and be more. It may not feel good in the moment, but often “You can do better—try again” is exactly what we need to hear.

    We need leaders who are straight shooters, not sugar-coaters. Not everything a leader has to say is positive. Growth requires someone who will be honest and direct and tell it like it is, and experiencing criticism expressed openly and honestly can make teams stronger and more productive. We miss out on lots of opportunities for learning and development when we’re surrounded by soft-pedaling critics.

    We need leaders who care less about being liked and more about being respected. Part of being a leader is making tough decisions. And if the leader is a good one, people will respect those decisions even if they dislike them. Leaders have to look at the big picture, and sometimes that means having the courage to do things that are unpopular—but those who are willing to make tough decisions for the good of all are ultimately the most admired.

    We need leaders who are experts, not enthusiasts. At the end of the day, do you want a leader who spends all day speaking lots of positive messages but doesn’t make a meaningful contribution to your team’s work? Far better to have an expert who is optimistic and skillful. There are plenty of leaders who try to make people feel good without giving them much to think about. But effective leadership makes you think—and then feel good about it.

    We all want bosses, managers and leaders who make us feel good, but it’s far more important—for ourselves and for our teams—that we find the people who can help us develop, grow and evolve. What we all need most is a leader we can trust and respect, one who will challenge us to discover our own motivation and become our own cheerleaders.

    Lead from within: The best leaders might not be the biggest cheerleaders but those who challenge us the most—and because they do, we respect them for it.


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Why People Who Want Their Leader to Be a Cheerleader Are Getting It Wrong appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:02 on 2020/09/15 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , Remote Working, ,   

    How to Collaborate Effectively with a Remote Team 


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    Many of us are missing the days when collaboration was as easy as stopping by someone’s office or arranging a face-to-face team meeting. Effective collaboration can still happen in the remote workplace, but it means cultivating a different set of skills and attitudes.

    Here are some of the foundational elements for successfully collaborating as your team works remotely.

    Shift the mindset. In the early days of the pandemic, working from home felt like a novelty—a quick solution for a few weeks until things got back to normal. The perspective now is far different. Remote work looks to be a long-term reality for many of us. As leaders, we need to help people shift their mindset to consider the new possibilities for creativity and innovation that remote work brings instead of wishing they were back at the office.

    Understand the different types of distance people are experiencing. In addition to the constraints of physical distance, remote teams face operational distance, where different teams have different sizes, skill sets, and attitudes, and connection distance, where trust, empathy and listening are more important—and more challenging—than ever. Leaders who want to build a strong foundation for team performance should first focus on improving connection distance. Strengthened trust and communication, in turn, are the best way to overcome operational and physical distance.

    Ensure psychological safety. Remote communication blurs some of the nonverbal cues people rely on for a sense of safety and security, and as a result there’s a greater tendency for people to hold back. Leaders need to create an atmosphere of safety and mutual respect so people know their questions and thoughts are welcome and feel safe speaking their mind.

    Foster true diversity and inclusion. Great collaboration requires diverse viewpoints, and it’s easier for majority voices to dominate in online settings. Leaders need to make sure everyone is included—that diversity is genuinely built into the collaborative process and not a matter of token representation.

    Prioritize process and accountability. Clear and well-documented workflows and documentation are critical to the success of any remote team. Something I often suggest to my clients is creating and maintaining a team charter—a regularly updated document that identifies the team and its responsibilities, context and accountability; sets specific measurable goals; assigns roles and responsibilities; and outlines work processes, a communication plan, and structures for decision-making and conflict resolution. Such a document, accessible to all and updated as needed, can go a long way in keeping everyone collaborating successfully and in promoting accountability.

    Especially since the pandemic upended everyone’s work processes, a proliferation of systems, platforms, apps and gimmicks are all being marketed as helping teams collaborate effectively. Some of them may even be effective for your workplace. But before you dive in, remember that collaboration begins with people, and meaningful improvement won’t come from new technologies but from better connections and deeper relationships.

    Lead from within: For collaboration to be effective as we work remotely, leaders need to focus on connections, processes, and communication.

     


    #1 N A T I O N A L  B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap
    What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Collaborate Effectively with a Remote Team appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 00:12:36 on 2020/09/11 Permalink
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    Video: How COVID-19 Impacts the Future of Digital Trust 


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    In the first installment of Kaleido Insights’ video series exploring the future technology-related impacts of COVID-19, we cover the topic of “digital trust.” Digital Trust: How is technology eroding or enhancing our trust among institutions, companies, and among citizens in society? Biometrics are becoming part of our future identity and our ability to move around the world and online. Our future digital identity may display our health status: immune, vaccinated, at risk, or infected by current or future diseases. Privacy technologies and questions of data distribution come to the forefront. As citizens are bombarded with information, they are increasingly questioning the level of truthfulness of what they are being told. Confusion is rife as some of what they are hearing … Continue readingVideo: How COVID-19 Impacts the Future of Digital Trust
     
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