Recent Updates Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • feedwordpress 17:30:48 on 2019/05/16 Permalink
    Tags: , , ,   

    How does an Administrative Professional Set Up an Official Process? Ask an Admin 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77
    training_for_administrative_assistants

    Welcome back to Ask an Admin! The blog series that allows administrative professionals to ask any questions they may have and have their peers give the best advice they can provide.

    This week Stacey asks:

    I am the Executive Assistant to the President and CEO, and the only assistant (the only admin, really) at this location. Coworkers leave documents on my desk; the expectation is that I secure the signature of the President and CEO, and then return it to the requestor (who’s assistant am I, anyway?). I would like to know how does an administrative professional set up an official process to obtain signatures and return the documents, but I could use some advice. How do other assistants deal with this? Or am I just being a jerk for not wanting to run other people’s signed documents all over the building to return them?

    Thanks a lot for your time!

    Stacey does ask a great question. This administrative professional has documents that need to be signed by the President and CEO then has to run the signed papers back to her co-workers. So, how does an administrative professional set up an official process?


    Want to learn more about Ask an Admin and how to submit your own question? Click here

    The post How does an Administrative Professional Set Up an Official Process? Ask an Admin appeared first on Office Dynamics - Executive And Administrative Assistant Training.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:22 on 2019/05/16 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , ,   

    How to Build Effective Leadership with These 8 Qualities 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    Whatever your position, whatever field you’re working in, whatever type of organization, the fundamentals of strong leadership are the same. Here are the eight qualities I consider essential to strong, effective, successful leadership:

    The competence in being positive. A positive attitude, especially from top management, can set a tone and signal others to be more positive—and, in turn, productive. When you’re optimistic about yourself and what you’re doing as well as about other people, you’re much more likely to inspire others to be and do their best. Positivity is contagious, and it’s a vital part of being a strong leader.

    The ability to be decisive. The ability to make difficult decisions based on the facts and circumstances of each specific situation is an important quality for effective leadership. To be a good leader, you need to rely on both your reason and your intuition and be able to pull everything you know together on the fly when a timely decision is required. Making decisions, especially difficult decisions, quickly and without waffling is among the most important elements of leadership.

    The resourcefulness to delegate. A confident leader is not afraid to let others handle the workload, and they know they can trust their team to get the job done. It is less confident leaders who are wary of delegating and feel that they need to control everything. If you have confidence in your people, they will show you how competent they are.

    The character of integrity. Everyone wants to be led by a leader who embodies integrity. If others are following your lead, it’s critical that you model integrity, honesty, trustworthiness, and accountability in everything you do. When all is said and done, integrity is the most important thing of all in leadership.

    The ability to listen to others. Listening is a skill, and it’s one that everyone, in every position, at every level—and especially those in leadership—should be proficient in and practice daily. Allowing others to speak and be heard is among the hallmarks of good leadership.

    The essence of humility. Humble leaders know that even though they are in charge, the contributions of others are equally important. They also understand that admitting mistakes is not a sign of weakness but a demonstration of strength. When you incorporate humility into your leadership, you’re on the path to building a strong, courageous team that collaborates and communicates well.

    The wisdom of being approachable. Leadership is a privilege, and in order for it to be truly effective you need to be accessible and approachable. People should always feel that the channels of communication are open and be comfortable sharing both good and bad news. Make sure you keep yourself available and responsive to the needs of those you lead.

    The mastery of motivation. One of the most difficult jobs for a leader is motivating others, especially when the circumstances are complex or difficult. The best way to master the art of motivation is by setting a good example yourself. In tough times, people look to their leadership for cues about how to react. If you lead from within, with high standards and steady action, you will automatically motivate and inspire others .

    How many of these qualities do you have within your own leadership? It’s never too soon to begin cultivating any elements you may be lacking. Remember, those who are following you expect you to lead with greatness.

    Lead from within: To keep your leadership strong, hold your focus on the essential qualities of the role.

     

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post How to Build Effective Leadership with These 8 Qualities appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 18:00:41 on 2019/05/14 Permalink
    Tags: , ,   

    Choosing the Best Administrative Assistant or Executive Assistant Conference 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77
    best_administrative_assistant_conference

    An administrative conference should feed your brain and soul!

    You have finally gotten the approval to attend an administrative conference, maybe you have decided to invest in yourself by attending an administrative conference but choosing the best administrative assistant or executive assistant conference is no easy task.

    Attending an administrative conference is a big investment of your time and money. You should choose wisely. There are numerous factors to take into consideration when deciding which administrative conference to attend.

    1. Start with the end in mind. What is your goal or goals for going to an administrative conference?
      • Education wise: What skills do you need to grow? What new skills do you need to learn/develop?
        • The problem with this is sometimes we don’t know what we need to develop. It’s called our blind spot. To understand this further, Google Johari Window.
        • For the last several years of hosting our administrative conference, we have had themes that most assistants would not even consider. That is because our intent is to develop assistants for what is to come! To be ahead of the curve. Some of our administrative conference themes have been: collaboration; resiliency; revolutionary; and empowerment.
      • To network and meet new people
      • Learn best practices from administrative peers
      • Learn best practices from subject matter experts
    2. Do your research. Make a comparison spreadsheet, if necessary
      • Topics to be covered – do they align with your goals?
      • Speakers – are they polished professionals? Do they walk their talk?  Do they understand the administrative profession? Or are they a thought leader in a particular area of focus?
      • The flow of the agenda – is there time for networking? Hallway conversations?
      • Location/Dates
      • The number of conference attendees is important. Do you want to be with thousands of assistants or just a few hundred? Both have their benefits, however, at smaller group administrative conference, you get to know more of the attendees and it is less chaotic allowing for enhanced networking. (You may not always see this number listed on the conference web site but you can call to ask how many people usually attend the conference.)
        • The pros and cons of large vs. intimate conferences.
      • WHO is hosting the conference? This is really important. Today there are several people who don’t understand the administrative profession but are hosting conferences for them. Normally for these individuals or organizations, they are hosting an administrative conference just to make money. It is better to choose an administrative conference where the host or hosting organization is on a real mission to help assistants.
      • What is the value of the program? What are you getting for your money? Any extra events such as a welcome dinner?  What meals are included? Of course, the content should always be the most important but when you are comparing one seminar to another and can only attend one, you need to consider these other aspects.
      • Inquire about the quality of the workshop materials? Some administrative conferences are cutting back on hard-copy participant materials to save money. Many speakers will not even create a handout for attendees. So attendees have to take a bunch of photos of the PowerPoint slides as the speaker presents. This is a pain as you can’t concentrate on what the speaker is saying. I view this as a speaker being lazy. Easy for them, more work for the conference participant. Will you be able to use the conference as a reference guide after the conference? Do they provide robust information? What about post-class follow-up activities for ongoing learning?
    3. Identify your learning style to help you choose the administrative conference that is best for you.
      • High energy or slower pace?
      • Hands-on; experiential or sit and listen?
      • Talked to or involved and be able to do activities with other attendees when a speaker is presenting
    4. When you attend a conference you are going to be surrounded by people for two or more days. What kinds of people do you relate to?
      • Low key vs. high energy. I personally love being around high-energy individuals.
      • Passionate about the profession or it’s just a job.
      • Committed to making personal change through developmental opportunities or someone who just wants to get out of the office and learn some basic stuff.
      • Do you want to be surrounded by people who will make you better? Or agree with you all the time?
      • Do you want to be around sharp, professional speakers and attendees or ho-hum people?

    The above list are things I personally consider when I am choosing the best administrative assistant or executive assistant conference. Be really selective when searching and choosing an administrative conference.

    joan_burge_signature
    administrative_assistant_conference

    The post Choosing the Best Administrative Assistant or Executive Assistant Conference appeared first on Office Dynamics - Executive And Administrative Assistant Training.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:00:28 on 2019/05/14 Permalink
    Tags: , Fearful, , , , ,   

    Why You Should Stop Leading Through Fear  


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    Confident leaders generally let their people do what they were hired to do. They don’t feel the need to watch them like a hawk, micromanage them in their tasks, track every move they make, or enact rules or policies that make them feel constrained and under surveillance.

    Those steps are taken by leaders who lead through fear, creating the kind of culture that is marked by terror, timidity, and low morale. Here are 10 significant signs that you might be leading from fear. If they sound familiar, you need to drastically change your leadership style to clean up the toxic culture and begin creating success and happiness for yourself and your team.

    People don’t interact. When people keep to themselves and avoid collaborating or interacting with others, it’s a sure sign that they’re scared to step out of line. If your employees’ main goal is to keep their heads down and stay in their own lane, your organization won’t be competitive.

    Order is maintained through punishment. People who work in punitive environments are frightened most of the time. It’s incredibly demoralizing to feel you are constantly being monitored to be caught doing something wrong. Effective leaders spend their time listening to people, solving problems and celebrating successes, not punishing people or trying to catch them doing something wrong.

    People don’t speak the truth. Under fear-based leadership, people are afraid to tell the truth because they already know no one wants to hear it. They keep problems and challenges to themselves because they know that that bringing them into the open won’t help and may even do them harm. The open communication that needs to happen for a team to work effectively is shut down completely.

    People are constantly afraid of losing their jobs. When people work under a cloud of fear and suspicion, they act out of anxiety and timidity, and they’re incapable of bringing their best. You cannot work well with the notion that you can lose your job over a misstep. Your job as leader is to bring the best out of people, and that’s not possible in a climate of fear.

    People are petrified of messing up. When people have a leader who addresses problems by penalizing someone, they learn to lay low and blame each other when things go wrong because they are scared to be the one who’s called out for a mistake. It’s one of the surest routes to a toxic culture.

    The best and brightest don’t advance. With a fear-based leader, the smartest and most competent people don’t tend to advance. Instead, promotions go to those who most wholeheartedly embrace the culture and agree with whatever the leader says. Over time, unthinking agreement becomes the only way to get ahead.

    People stop wanting to be visible. In a climate of fear, it’s hard for people to be authentic or present. They keep to themselves, worried about making waves or standing out. The main goal of most employees becomes to avoid being noticed, which leads to mediocrity across the board.

    If you recognize this culture, you need to know that leading through fear is doing direct harm to your leadership, your team and your organization. It’s likely that many of your most talented and gifted people have already left you, so take immediate steps to make the necessary changes before you lose the rest.

    Lead from within: As a leader, your job is to make people feel secure, safe and supported. If you are instead creating havoc, control and anxiety, you are a fearful leader and need to make some changes.

     


    #1  N A T I O N A L   B E S T S E L L E R

    The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness


    After decades of coaching powerful executives around the world, Lolly Daskal has observed that leaders rise to their positions relying on a specific set of values and traits. But in time, every executive reaches a point when their performance suffers and failure persists. Very few understand why or how to prevent it.

    buy now

     


    Additional Reading you might enjoy:

     

    Photo Credit: iStockPhotos

    The post Why You Should Stop Leading Through Fear  appeared first on Lolly Daskal.

     
  • feedwordpress 01:48:06 on 2019/05/12 Permalink
    Tags:   

    Driving value for your customers 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    A new drive through self-service car wash called Auto Spa opened up in my neighborhood, so I decided to try it. As I entered and saw it cost seven dollars, I thought that was a bit pricey just to wash the outside of the car, even though unlike other self serves, this one dries the vehicle for you. However, they market themselves as a car spa, so maybe there were some spa like amenities.

    At the full-service car wash I normally frequent, they clean the inside and outside of the vehicle for ten dollars. Even when they’re crowded, they go the extra mile as well, sometimes rinsing off the mats or using compound to erase a scratch. They don’t charge for it either. Instead they smile and say, “our pleasure”.

    As my car and I exited the auto spa washroom, four men yielding drying cloths began wiping down the vehicle. I opened the driver’s door and pointed to the dirty water that had pooled on the ledge where you step into the car and asked one of the men if he would wipe that too.

    He replied, “we don’t do that”.

    I was surprised so I repeated what he said and inquired why not?

    He answered, “we just don’t do that”.

    Not wanting to get into an argument, I pointed out that he was already drying the car and the dirty water at the bottom of the door was caused by the wash.

    He shrugged and walked away.

    So, as he and his three colleagues stood just feet away, I opened the trunk, pulled out some towels and wiped the dirty water caused by the car wash as they watched.

    I was about to leave when a cloud of irritation swept over me. That’s when I got out of the car and found the manager. I told him as one business owner to another, I wanted to give him some friendly advice. After explaining what happened, he said he was sorry, and they would dry it next time. I said there wouldn’t be a next time because I was never coming back. I told him I would return to the car wash down the road because they provided better service and you got more for your money.

    He nodded. I continued and explained that the bigger problem is business thrives by word of mouth. If I tell someone I had a bad experience, they’ll tell someone else who will tell someone else who will post on social media and then people stop coming. However, if you go the extra mile and provide great service, your customers can become your best public relations agents.

    Something seemed to resonate as he asked who of the four employees refused to wipe the dirty water from my car. Not wanting to get anyone in trouble, I said I wasn’t sure. He walked over and reprimanded all of them. I drove away.

    Regardless of industry, going the extra mile is about providing value for others. When you help someone out, do something without being asked or provide an additional service at the same cost, that’s value. Not only do you score a few extra points, but you make others feel good in the process.

    I recall a situation that coincidentally, also involved cars. A car dealer we worked with wanted to provide customer service training for its service representatives after someone failed to go that extra mile. A woman who had been without her car for several days came to pick it up. It was a dreary drizzly day with salt and melting snow assaulting cars on the roads. As she drove out and put her windshield wipers on, there was no windshield wiper fluid. Furious, she drove back to the dealership and asked why. The service manager told her it wasn’t on the work order.

    A few extra minutes providing checking fluid levels could have increased customer value and led to years of additional business. Instead, the woman never came back again.

    So, what exactly is value? To customers, it’s often when a person feels they received good service at a good price, or they received extra services at no extra cost. Companies often claim they provide extra value at no additional cost, but the only person who can determine value is the customer. To me, value is about the experience.

    Let’s say you hire a company to provide certain services. They do a good job and you feel the cost was reasonable. Next year, you hire a different company to deliver the same services. They also do a good job, but the people are friendlier, warmer and they spend more time with you than expected. Additionally, they throw in a few extras and give you helpful hints for the future. Then they check in with you a few days later to make sure all is well. You had a better experience with the second company. That experience equals value. Value often leads to loyalty.

    As I am writing this article, I’m in the process of getting some insurance quotes. I reached out to three companies. The first company emailed me a form and said when I complete it, they’ll provide a quote. The second company which I already do business with told me to call my agent. The agent told me to call someone else. The third company had someone return my phone call almost instantly. She asked questions, seemed to take an interest in my needs and promised to provide a quote as quickly as possible.

    Unless the quote is outrageous, I will choose her. She provided a better experience and gave me a glimpse of what it might be like to work with her company in the future.

    Do an on-line search for customer value and you will find over a million articles on the subject. From creating value steps, implementing strategies to improving customer experience, many of these articles provide solid advice. The best ones offer common sense.

    That means standing in your customer’s shoes. How would you feel if your car was being serviced for days and they didn’t check the windshield wiper fluid? Or you pay good money to have your car dried and they miss part of it? Typically, it’s the little things that ruin experiences for customers. Little things add up and detract from value. When customers feel they aren’t receiving what’s valuable to them, they go elsewhere, and your business dries up.

    Facebooktwitterlinkedinrssyoutube
     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
esc
cancel

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedlink.class.php on line 302

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedlink.class.php on line 302

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedlink.class.php on line 302

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedlink.class.php on line 302